VERNON

JUDO

CLUB
 
 

Established 1944
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Sanctioned By

JUDO BC

JUDO CANADA

KODOKAN

JUDO THE SPORT


Like fencing in the Western World, Judo is a sport which evolved from a martial art. Like the Knights of Medieval Europe, the warriors of Feudal Japan were a military class, and jujitsu - along with swordsmanship, archery, horsemanship, etc. was a skill designed for battle. As its ends were military, no holds were barred and along with the throws and locks that remain in present-day Judo were included techniques of kicking, slashing, and anything else that might disable an enemy efficiently. Japan at this time was broken up into several hundred little states and at the castletown of each there were schools of jujitsu, each with its own tradition and style. When a modern unified state arose in 1868, the Feudal Regime and most of its works disappeared. Jujitsu however, was preserved as Judo through the efforts of Dr. Kano, who selected from the old schools those techniques suitable to the modern age. With the elimination of its deadly aspects, a refinement of the throws and locks took place and what had been an adjutant art of mayhem became a sport that anyone could practice safely.
 

 

Jujitsu means ggentle arth while Judo means ggentle wayh. In both cases ggentleh refers to the philosophical premise that one can conquer by yielding. The actual does not always come up to the ideal, but even in most awkward throws one must take advantage of some lack in the opponentfs balance of position.

DOJO PLEDGE


 
 

1

OBSERVE THE RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE CLUB AND BE COURTEOUS AND KIND TO OTHERS.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2

ALWAYS RESPECT OUR ELDERS, ASSIST OTHERS AND BE POSITIVE.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3

VALUE CLEANLINESS, BE DISCIPLINED, TEMPER OUR PHYSICAL BEINGS AND STRIVE TO BE DESERVING MEMBERS OF SOCIETY.
 
 

AN INTRODUCTION TO JUDO


WHAT IS JUDO?
 

 

The name Kodokan Judo implies a system of physical and mental training, based upon the principle of JU (yawara - gentleness). It was first introduced in its present form by Dr. Jigoro Kano, who in 1882 founded the Kodokan Judo Institute in Tokyo. The system he taught soon proved to be far superior to that of the old schools of JUJITSU, and has gained in popularity to such an extent that it can now claim over fifty million students, young and old, male and female.
 

 

WHY IS IT STUDIED?
 

 

If asked this question most students will say they first joined a Judo Club for quite easily understood reasons. The most common being exercise and self-defense, which, combined with a certain element of mystery and the often undeserved reputation of being a Judo expert, can be reason enough to start with. However, we are only willing to spend so much time and trouble for aims of this nature, and if after a while we have failed to find a better reason for practising than these, we are almost certain to become bored and give up; Many do give up, having failed to grasp the real reason and meaning of Kodokan Judo.

Of this much you can be sure, there is a better reason for studying Judo than those just given. There is in fact, something in the art of Judo that makes many men and women spend a lifetime in its study. No amount of reading will enable us to comprehend the real meaning of this sport. It can only be discovered in the course of actual participation through which we can grow to love the hours spent in the Dojo. It is, however, our object in this introduction to try and give some thought to its real significance.
 

 

The ultimate objective of Judo is the perfection of onefs self by the systematic training of mind and body through exercise, so that each works in harmony with the other. With this in mind we can better understand the stated objective of Kodokan Judo which are: Physical development, mental and moral development, and contest ability.
 

 

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT
 

 

Physical training today all too often favours appearances rather than usefulness. Such is not the case with Judo. Here the stress is on the development of a useful body which implies good health and physical fitness. In Judo we do not consider physical training as an end in itself, but as a means of making the body better able to serve the mind.
 

 

MORAL AND MENTAL DEVELOPMENT
 

 

Certain sports (while they remain sports) can have a definitely beneficial effect on the adult or child that practises them. These good effects, however, last only as long as the sport is practised for its own sake.

Financial and commercial interests, if they are allowed to enter into the activity in any way, will surely kill all that is truly beneficial in them, leaving only that which can qualify as crowd pleasing or money making. This danger was foreseen in Judo from the start, when Dr. Kano caused a rule to be laid down prohibiting any use or display of Judo for personal gain or profit.

The result is that Kodokan Judo today occupies an almost unique position in modern sport, allowing no form of commercial exploitation and seeking in these the betterment of society through its effect on the individual.

Judo is the gentle way: gMaximum efficiency for minimum efforth, and should be practiced in a manner beneficial to all, injuring no one.


MUTUAL WELFARE AND BENEFIT

These two statements continually remind us of the right way to approach our studies, but the right way is not always the easiest way. People may get much quicker results using strength only; this can result in injury to others, but what is there to stop people from doing this? Nothing, except their own thoughts and feelings on the matter. The victory they gained will not satisfy them; they cannot truthfully be proud of it, and this may cause them to be critical of their own actions and intentions in the future, remembering that half the battle is knowing when you are wrong.
 

 

Consider the following: the most you can hope to do is double your physical size and strength, but there is no limit to the number of times you can multiply your skill. As you increase in skill however, another and more difficult test awaits. Training in humility, you must be ever more prepared to stand by, saying and doing nothing, while events occur that make you long to try out new found strength. It would seem that you are being called upon for no good reason, to renounce the recognition you think is due. Yet this is not the case, for at such times, we begin to understand the meaning of words like these:
 

 

gIf one man conquer in battle a thousand men, And another man

conquer himself, He is the greatest of conquerorsh.


In this and in numerable other ways, Judo runs as it were parallel to life, based as it is on natural laws of action and reaction it cannot become false, and the lessons learnt are of true value.
 

 

CONTEST ABILITY
 

 

If you practise Judo as a means of personal development, then the Judo contest provides you with a guage whereby to measure progress. Without such a test we could credit ourselves with all manner of wonderful abilities, but with it we are forced to face ourselves as we really are. There is no such thing as luck in a Judo contest. If we lose, it must be considered that in some way we have been found lacking, and we must work to overcome our deficiencies. If we win by fair and skillful technique, then we stand ready to aim at greater things. But if we win by unfair means or by unnecessary use of strength, then we have need of much soul searching, for it is better to lose than win in such a manner.
 

 
 
 

RANDORI (Free Practise)
 

 

In Randori your object must he to develop technique in conjunction with a relaxed body and an alert mind. It does not matter whether you win or lose in Randori, but it is important that you use every moment to the full, move freely, attack often and if your attack is countered get up and try again. You will benefit from your studies in direct proportion to the amount of effort you put into them. At times you may get discouraged, in which case it may help you to compare your progress with the growth of a tree - you cannot see it growing, yet you know that it is.
 

 
 
 

SHIAI (Contest)
 

 

When entering into Shiai, never underestimate your opponent. Respect - yet be determined to beat - your opponent. Nervous strain and tension will detract considerably from your performance, it is your true ability that shows in a contest, and in time you may come to regard the Shiai as a far reaching contest with yourself.
 

 

UKEMI (Breakfalls)
 

 

Many people have a deep-seated fear of falling. Its removal may not seem too significant, yet it is nonetheless a big step forward in the process of removing fear through knowledge, which, if continued correctly can enable the individual to rightly make use of the environment, instead of being controlled by it.
 

 
 
 

PERSONAL HYGIENE
 

 

All judoka are requested to wash their feet before practising and if necessary shower. Finger and toenails should be kept short, and all rings, watches and the like should be removed. Judo suits, or judogi, should be kept clean and in good repair.
 

 

RANKS IN JUDO
 

 

As in Japanese martial arts, judo ranks are based on the kyu and dan system. The kyu numbers for judo start at 6 - for a beginner - and work down to 1 for a brown belt. Kyu ranks (or the coloured belts) are often referred to as mudansha, literally those who do not have a dan ranking. The dan numbers, for degrees of black belt standing, start at one and go up to ten. Yudansha is the term for people that have black-belt ranking. Traditionally 10th dan has been reserved for the founder of judo, Jigoro Kano and a small number of his students.
 

 
 

Rokkyu
6th kyu - white
or white belt
Gokyu
5th Kyu - yellow 
 
Shikyu or (Yonkyu)
4th kyu - orange 
 
Sankyu
3rd Kyu - green 
or brown (violet in some junior divisions)
Nikyu
2nd Kyu - blue 
 
lkkyu
1st kyu - brown 
 
 
 

Shodan
1st dan
Black belt
Nidan
2nd dan
 
Sandan
3rd dan
 
Yodan
4th dan
 
Godan
5th dan
 
 
 

Rokudan
6th dan
Black belt or red with white sections
Shichidan
7th dan
 
Hachidan
8th dan
 
 
 

Kudan
9th dan
Black or red belt
Judan
10th dan
 
 

To recognise achievement between these levels, the Vernon Judo Club has often awarded stripes toward the next rank. The VJC is sanctioned to grade up to the rank of brown belt, ikkyu. In Canada, black belt testing, or danza, is done by regional, provincial and national grading boards.

DOJO RULES


1. Keep finger and toenails short and clean.

2. Feet should be washed.

3. Keep your judogi clean.

4. Be on time for classes.

5. Do not use another personfs judogi.

6. All judogi should have initials.

7. No one should chew gum during classes.

8. Remove rings and other metal ornaments, including metallic berets or hairbands, before going onto the tatami.

9. Everyone should remove footwear before walking onto the tatami.

10. All members should bow, to pay their respect to Dr. Kano before going onto the tatami and leaving it.

11. Members shall not use profanity in the Dojo.

12. No horseplay on the tatami.

13. No smoking in the tatami areas.

14. The Instructor is to be referred to as eSen-Seih.

15. Excessive laughter or loud talking on the tatami will not be allowed.

16. At the beginning and at the end of each practice, Judoka should bow to each other.

17. Do not practice while intoxicated or under the influence of any drugs or medication.

18. Both judoka should kneel on one knee, while one fixes a judogi.

19. No conversation except pertaining to Judo will be permitted on the tatami.

20 Never misuse your knowledge of Judo. Aside from sanctioned tournaments and demonstrations, only extreme circumstances justify the use of judo in public.

21. Promotions to higher belt classes are judged by onefs general attitude, character, attendance, tournament results and techniques.

22. Obey the Instructors at all times.

23. Know your Judo Pledge.

24. Practice Judo with Confidence and Willingness.



JUDOTERMINOLOGY


 

Judo
Way or Principle of Gentleness
Jujitsu
Art or Practise of Gentleness
Professor Jigoro Kano
Founder of the Kodokan Judo (Feb. 1882)
Ukimitsu Kano
Present of the Kodokan. Grandson of Professor Kano
Kodokan Judo Institute
Center of World Judo, Tokyo, Japan
Judoka
Judoist or Student
Judo-gi
Judo Suit
Dojo
Exercise or Practise Hall
Tatami
Judo Mats (Size 3f x 6f or 1m x 2m)
Sensei
Instructor or Teacher
Kyu
Grade for Class below Black Belt
Dan 
Grade for Black Belt Holder
Kiyotsuke
Attention
Rei
Bow
Tori
Attacker
Uke
Receiver or Defender
Shiai
Tournament
Hajime
Start or Begin
Osaekomi
Holding or Hold-down
Sono-mama
Do Not Move or No Movement
Yoshi
Go or All Right
Soremade
That is All
Matte
Wait
Toketa
Broken
Jikan
Time
Hansoku
Prohibited Act
Hansoku-make
Disqualification or Loss by Violation
Keikoku
Warning or Over Half Penalty
Chui
Caution or Near Half Penalty
Fusen
Default
Kiken
Withdrawal
Shido
Note or Minor Penalty
lppon
Full Point
Waza-ari
Almost lppon
Waza-ari-awasete-ippon
Two Waza-ari Make an lppon
Yuko
Almost Waza-ari
Koka
Minor Technical Result
Yusei-gachi
Superiority Win
Hiki-wake
Draw
Hantei
Decision
Kachi
Win
Make
Loss
Sutemi-waza
Sacrifice Throw
Ne-waza
Groundwork
Nage-waza
Throwing Techniques
Katame-waza
Grappling Techniques
Shime-waza
Strangling Techniques
Kansetsu-waza
Armlock Techniques
Ashi-garami
Entangled Legs
Obi
Belt


Ichi
1
Roku
6
Ni
2
Shichi (or nana)
7
San
3
Hachi
8
Shi (or yon)
4
Ku (or kyu)
9
Go
5
Ju
10
 

THE KODOKAN GOKYO

THROWING TECHNIQUES

DAI-IKKYO
 

1.
De-Ashi-Harai
Advanced Foot Sweep
2.
Hiza-Guruma
Knee Wheel
3.
Sasae-Tsurikomi-Ashi
Propping Drawing Ankle Throw
4.
Uki-Goshi
Floating Hip
5.
O-Soto-Gari
Major Outer Reap
6.
O-Goshi
Major Loin
7.
O-Uchi-Gari
Major Inner Reaping
8.
Seoi-Nage
Shoulder Throw

 

DAI-NIKKYO
 

9.
Ko-Soto-Gari
Minor Outer Reaping
10.
Ko-Uchi-Gari
Minor Inner Reaping
11.
Koshi-Guruma
Loin Wheel
12.
Tsurikomi-Goshi
Lift Pull Loin
13.
Okuri-Ashi-Harai
Sweeping Ankle Throw
14.
Tai-Otoshi
Body Drop
15.
Harai-Goshi
Sweeping Loin
16.
Uchi-Mata
Inner Thigh

 

DAI-SANKYO
 

17.
Ko-Soto-Gake
Minor Outer Hooking Ankle
18.
Tsuri-Goshi
Lifting Hip Throw
19.
Yoko-Otoshi
Side Drop
20.
Ashi-Guruma
Leg Wheel
21.
Hane-Goshi
Spring Hip Throw
22.
Harai-Tsurikomi-Ashi
Sweeping Drawing Ankle Throw
23.
Tomoe-Nage
Stomach Throw
24.
Kata-Guruma
Shoulder Wheel

 

DAI-YONKYO
 

25.
Sumigaeshi
Corner Throw
26.
Tani-Otoshi
Valley Drop
27.
Hane-Makikomi
Outer Winding Spring Hip
28.
Sukui-Nage
Scooping Throw
29.
Utsuri-Goshi
Changing Hip
30.
O-Guruma
Major Wheel
31.
Soto-Makikomi
Outer Winding Throw
32.
Uki-Otoshi
Floating Drop

 

DAI-GOKYO
 

33.
O-Soto-Guruma
Major Outer Wheel
34.
Uki-Waza
Floating Throw
35.
Yoko-Wakare
Side Separation
36.
Yoko-Guruma
Side Wheel
37.
Ushiro-Goshi
Rear Loin
38.
Ura-Nage
Rear Throw
39.
Sumi-Otoshi
Corner Drop
40.
Yoko-Gake
Side Body Drop

ADDITIONAL THROWS
 

 
Obi Otoshi
Belt Drop
 
Yama Arashi
Mountain Storm
 
Daki Wakare
Body Seizure Separation
 
Hikki-Komi-Gaeshi
Big Exterior Dropping
 
Osoto-Otoshi
Major Outer Drop
 
Tawara Gaeshi
Rice Bale Reversal
 
Uchi-Makikomi
Inner Winding Throw
 
Seoi-Otoshi
Shoulder Drop
 
Kuchiki-Taoshi
Dead Tree Drop
 
Morote-Gari
Two Hand Reaping
 
Ouchi-Gake
Major Inner Hook
 
Kouchi-Gake
Minor Inner Hook
 
Tsubame-Gaeshi
Swallow Counter
 
Kani-Basami
Scissor Throw
 
Seoi-Makikomi
Shoulder Winding Throw
 
Ude-Gaeshi
Arm Reversal
 
Kibisu-Gaeshi
Heel Throw
 
Gan-Seki-Otoshi
Both Lapel Drop

OSAE-WAZA

Controlling (Hold-Down) Techniques

(Junior and Senior)


 

1.
    Kesa-Gatame

    Kuzure Kesa-Gatame

    Makura Kesa-Gatame

    Ushiro Kesa-Gatame

Scarf Hold

Modified Scarf Hold

Pillow Scarf Hold

Backward Scarf Hold

2.
Kata-Gatame
Shoulder Hold
3.
Kamishiho-Gatame
Locking of Upper Four Quarters
4.
Kuzure Kamishiho-Gatame
Broken Locking of Upper Four Quarters
5.
Yoko-Shiho-Gatame
Side Locking of Four Quarters
6.
Kuzure Yoko-Shiho-Gatame
Broken Side Locking of Four Quarters
7.
Tate-Shiho-Gatame
Longitudinal Locking of Four Quarters
 

Shime-Waza

Choke and Strangulation Techniques

(Senior only)


 

1.
Kata-Juji-Jime
Half Cross Lock
2.
Gyaku-Juji-Jime
Reverse Cross Lock
3.
Nami-Juji-Jime
Normal Cross Lock
4.
Hadaka-Jime
Naked Choke Lock
5.
Okuri-Eri-Jime
Sliding Cellar of Lapel Lock
6.
Kata-Ha-Jime
Single Wing Lock
 

KANSETSU-WAZA

Joint Lock Techniques

(Senior only)


 

1.
Ude-Garami
Entangled Arm Lock
2.
Ude Hishigi Ude Gatame
Straight-Arm Arm Lock
3.
Ude Hishigi Juji Gatame
Cross Arm Over Body
4.
Ude Hishigi Hiza Gatame
Knee Arm Lock
5.
Ashi-Garami
Entangled Leg Lock
6.
Waki-Gatame
Armpit Arm Lock

 

NAGE-NO-KATA

(Formal Throwing Techniques)


 

TE-WAZA
HAND TECHNIQUES
Uki-Otoshi
Floating Drop
Seoi-Nage
Shoulder Throw
Kata-Guruma
Shoulder Wheel
 
 

KOSHl-WAZA
LOIN (HIP) TECHNIQUES
Uki-Goshi
Floating Hip
Harai-Goshi
Sweeping Loin
Tsuri-Komi-Goshi
Lift & Pull Loin
 
 

ASHI-WAZA
FOOT AND LEG TECHNIQUES
Okuri-Ashi-Harai
Sweeping Ankle Throw
Sasae-Tsurikomi-Ashi
Propped Drawing-Ankle Throw
Uchimata
Inner Thigh
 
 

MA-SUTEMI-WAZA
SACRIFICE THROWS (On Back)
Tomoe-Nage
Stomach Throw
Ura-nage
Rear Throw
Sumi-Gaeshi
Corner Throw
 
 

YOKO-SUTEMIWAZA
SACRIFICE THROWS (On Side)
Yoko-Gake
Side Dash
Yoko-Guruma
Side Wheel
Uki-Waza
Floating Throw
 

KATAME-NO-KATA

(Formal Grappling Techniques)


 

OSAE-WAZA
HOLDING TECHNIQUES
Kesa-Gatame
Scarf Hold
Kata-Gatame
Shoulder Hold
Kami Shiho-Gatame
Upper Four Quarter Hold
Yoko Shiho-Gatame
Side Four Quarter Hold
Kuzure-KamishihoGatame
Modified Upper Foot Quarter Hold
 
 

SHIME-WAZA
CHOKE AND STRANGULATION TECHNIQUES
Kata-juji-Jime
Single Cross Lock
Hadaka-Jime
Naked Neck Lock
Okuri-Eri-Jime
Sliding Collar Lock
Kata-ha-Jime
Single Wing Lock
Gyaku-Juji-Jime
Reverse Cross Lock
 
 

KANSETSU-WAZA
JOINT LOCKS
Ude-Garami
Entangled Arm Lock
Ude-Hishigi-Juji-Gatame
Crushing Cross Arm Lock
Ude-Hishigi-Ude Gatame
Crushing Arm Lock
Ude-Hishigi-Hiza Gatame
Knee Crushing Arm Lock
Ashi-Garami
Entangled Leg Lock

KODOKAN GOSHINJITSU

(Self-defense Techniques of Kodokan Judo)


 

Against attacks with bare hand and knee in close body contact:
Ryote-dori
Both wrists seizure
Hidari-eri-dori
Left lapel seizure
Migi-eri-dori
Right lapel seizure
Kata-eri-dori
Single elbow seizure
Ushiro-eri-dori
Back collar seizure
Ushiro-jime
Naked neck lock from behind
Kakae-dori
Body seizure from behind
 
 

Against attacks with bare hand and foot with separation:
Naname-uchi
Oblique blow to left temple
Ago-tsuki
Upper cut
Ganmen-Tsuki
Straight strike to face
Mae-keri
Testicles kick
Yoko-keri
Side kick
 
 

Against thrusts with dagger:
Tsukkake
Before stomach thrust with a dagger
Chokuzuki
Stomach thrust with a dagger
Naname-zuki
Oblique thrust at left neck with a dagger
 
 

Against blows with a cane:
Furl-age
Swing up a cane
Furi-oroshi
Swing down a cane
Morote-zuki
Stomach thrust with a cane
 
 

Against drawn pistol:
Shomen-zuki
Shooting with a pistol from front
Koshi-gamae
Shooting with a pistol placed on loin corner
Haimen-zuke
Shooting with a pistol from behind.