About Myself
 
"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I . . .
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference."

          - ROBERT FROST (1874-1963), The Road Not Taken

An educator; a published literary translator; a writer manqué; a movie & photography buff; a lover of Baroque music; a globe-trotter who, for the last 12 years, has traveled extensively in about 30 countries - mostly in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia; an avid reader of both fiction & non-fiction [with a special interest in things Brazilian]; fluently bilingual [English/Portuguese], plus a smattering of French, Spanish, Italian & German [currently trying to learn Mandarin]; a frequent traveler to Brazil




On Traveling & Travelers:
My Favorite Quotes 


        "You perceive I generalize with intrepidity from single instances.  It's the tourist's custom."
    - MARK TWAIN  (1835-1910)

 

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TRAVELING & TOURING

"There is a wonderful, but neglected precision in these words. The old English noun "travel" (in the sense of a journey) was originally the same word as "travail" (meaning "trouble," "work," or "torment") . . . Significantly, too, the word "tour" in "tourist" was derived by back-formation from the Latin "tornus," which in turn came from the Greek word for a tool describing a circle. The traveler, then, was working at something; the tourist was a pleasure-seeker. The traveler was active; he went strenuously in search of people, of adventure, of experience. The tourist is passive; he expects interesting things to happen to him."

          -- DANIEL J. BOORSTIN (1914-2004), The Image: 
                                                            A Guide to Pseudo Events  in America

  "Travel, in the younger sort, is a part of education; in the elder, a part of experience. He that travelleth into a country before he hath some entrance into the language, goeth to school, and not to travel." 
                          - FRANCIS BACON (1561-1626), On Travel

"I have found out that there ain't no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them."
          - MARK TWAIN (1835-1910), Tom Sawyer Abroad
"Travel is one of the most private of pleasures. There is no greater bore than the travel bore. We do not in the least want to hear what he has seen in Hong Kong."
         - VITA SACKVILLE-WEST (1892-1962), Passage to Teheran

"Travel can be one of the most rewarding forms of introspection."
               - LAWRENCE DURRELL (1912-1990), Bitter Lemons

"The use of traveling is to regulate imagination by reality, and instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are."
          - SAMUEL JOHNSON (1709-1784), Johnsoniana
"People commonly travel the world over to see rivers and mountains, new stars, garish birds, freak fish, grotesque breeds of human; they fall into an animal stupor that gapes at existence and they think they have seen something."
       - SOREN KIERKEGAARD  (1813-1855), Preamble from the Heart
"Should we have stayed at home and thought of here?
Where should we be today?
 Is it right to be watching strangers in a play
 in this strangest of theaters?"

         -  ELIZABETH BISHOP (1911-1979), Questions of Travel
"Though we travel the world over to find the beautiful, we must carry it with us, or we find it not."
         - RALPH WALDO EMERSON (1803-1882), Art, Essays, First Series
"Travel is like adultery: one is always tempted to be unfaithful to one's own county. To have imagination is inevitably to be dissastisfied with where you live.  [. . .] In our wanderlust, we are lovers looking for consummation."
            -  ANATOLE BROYARD (1910-1990), Being There

"What gives value to travel is fear. It is the fact that, at a certain moment, when we are so far from our own country [...] we are seized by a vague fear, and an instinctive desire to go back to the protection of old habits. This is the most obvious benefit of travel. At that moment we are feverish but also porous, so that the slightest touch makes us quiver to the depths of our being. We come across a cascade of light, and there is eternity. This is why we should not say that we travel for pleasure. There is no pleasure in traveling, and I look upon it more as an occasion for spiritual testing. If we understand by culture the exercise of our most intimate sense -- that of eternity -- then we travel for culture. Pleasure takes us away from ourselves in the same way as distraction, in Pascal's use of the word, takes us away from God. Travel, which is like a greater and a graver science, brings us back to ourselves."
       - ALBERT CAMUS (1913-1960), Notebooks 1935-1942  
  "My heart is warm with the friends I make,
          And better friends I'll not be knowing.
           Yet there isn't a train I wouldn' take,
           No matter where it's going."
              - EDNA ST. VINCENT MILLAY (1892-1950),   Travel

  "A way of certifying experience, taking photographs is also a way of refusing it -  by limiting experience to a search for the photogenic, by converting experience into an image, a souvenir.  Travel becomes a strategy for accumulating photographs. "
          - SUSAN SONGTAG (1933 -  ),  On Photography

  "An agreeable companion on a journey is as good as a carriage."
             -  Publius Syrus  (42 B.C.)

  "Travel light and you can sing in the robber's face."
              -  Juvenal  (60-130 A.D.)

            

Note: All photos throughout this website are by & the property of E. F. Giacomelli

efgiacom@NoSpamhotmail.com

Site uptaded July 2004

Site      Updated August 202    © 2002  EF. Giacomelli                         
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