Stumpers: Trivia and other
games (to keep you amused).








Try some more Medium Canuck Trivia or try your luck at the Hard Canuck Trivia.


Standout:
Markus Naslund recorded 756 points as a Canuck.

Medium Canuck Trivia

Here are ten "medium" questions. Follow the links below and see how long it takes you to get to the end. If your links don't work (or you get lost), you can scroll around the table following the red numbers.


[1] Question 1: Which goalie holds the record for most saves made in a Canuck playoff game?
1.
Kirk McLean [12]
2.
Roberto Luongo [24]
3.
Glen Hanlon [32]
4.
Gary Smith [45]
5.
Richard Brodeur [58]
[2] Harry did coach the Canucks in the playoffs several times, but he doesn't hold the record. Return to question 7 [60]
[3] Well done. Our first game was against them, and we just keep playing them. Proceed to question 5 [15]
[4] So he was 13 when he joined the Canucks. I don't think so. Return to question 9 [39]
[5] Actually Harold only had one number (27) despite two stays in Vancouver. Return to question 8 [41]
[6] Steamer had a fine career, but he never made it to 1000 games in the NHL. Return to question 6 [35]
[7] A fine scrapper in his day, but he hasn't played in twenty years. Return to question 3 [23]
[8] Well, you are half right (but which half?). Return to question 5 [15]
[9] Nope. It didn't happen. Return to question 10 [56]
[10] Not even close. Return to question 2 [13]
[11] Gino wore 66 one game, but after that it was number 29 all the way. Return to question 8 [41]
[12] He did hold this record, but it has been broken. Return to question 1. [1]
[13] Question 2: Let's carry on with the playoff theme: In the 1994 playoffs, how many overtime wins did the Canucks have over the Calgary Flames?
1.
Zero [10]
2.
One [21]
3.
Two [34]
4.
Three [48]
5.
Four [61]
[14] You got it! He ended his fine career (1101 total NHL games) in Vancouver. Proceed to question 7 [60]
[15] Question 5: Besides Vancouver, which NHL team(s) did Cam Neely play for?
1.
Boston and Detroit [8]
2.
Boston and Hartford [25]
3.
Detroit [29]
4.
Boston and Winnipeg [42]
5.
Boston [55]
[16] That's not the way it was done. Return to question 10 [56]
[17] Nope, try again. Return to question 3 [23]
[18] No, he wasn't a prairie boy. Return to question 9 [39]
[19] A good guess, but they've been in the other conference a long time. Return to question 4 [49]
[20] Not even close. Return to question 7 [60]
[21] Close, but wrong. Return to question 2 [13]
[22] Sorry, that's actually the wrong answer. Return to question 8 [41]
[23] Question 3: Which Canuck enforcer wore jersey number 28 before switching to his more familiar jersey number 8?
1.
Bobby Schmautz [7]
2.
Brad May [17]
3.
Donald Brashear [36]
4.
Craig Coxe [47]
5.
Shawn Antoski [59]
[24] When a game goes into a fourth overtime period, you need great goaltending. Proceed to question 2 [13]
[25] Well, you are half right (but which half?). Return to question 5 [15]
[26] Correct. The Canucks obtained him for a draft pick that wasn't even ours. Just the bonus question left now.
[27] Yes, he was indeed a BC boy. Proceed to question 10 [56]
[28] Dave did indeed play his 1000th NHL game with the Canucks, but he wasn't the first. Return to question 6 [35]
[29] Cam Neely, the famous Red Wing? I don't think so. Return to question 5 [15]
[30] Tiger did switch numbers, but he preferred 22. Return to question 8 [41]
[31] Bonus Question: What was the name of the WHA team that shared the Pacific Coliseum with the Canucks during 1973-74 and 1974-75? See the answer.
[32] Glen faced a lot of shots in his time, but not all in the same game. Return to question 1. [1]
[33] Of course. He coached a whopping 61 playoff games. Move on to question 8 [41]
[34] You're getting warm. Return to question 2 [13]
[35] Question 6: Who was the first player to play in his 1000th NHL game while a member of the Canucks?
1.
Stan Smyl [6]
2.
Pit Martin [14]
3.
Dave Babych [28]
4.
Ryan Walter [51]
5.
Harold Snepsts [62]
[36] Knock out! He did wear both numbers. Proceed to question 4 [49]
[37] He's not from the big city. Return to question 9 [39]
[38] No, I think I would have heard about that. Return to question 10 [56]
[39] Question 9: When and where was Doug Lidster born?
1.
April 11, 1970 in Medicine Hat, Alberta [4]
2.
January 8, 1963 in Regina, Saskatchewan [18]
3.
October 18, 1960 in Kamloops, BC [27]
4.
September 7, 1963 in Toronto, Ontario [37]
5.
May 23, 1961 in Edmonton, Alberta [54]
[40] You are absolutely correct. Proceed to question 9 [39]
[41] Question 8: Which Canuck enforcer wore jersey number 27, 31 and 18 as a Canuck?
1.
Harold Snepsts [5]
2.
Gino Odjick [11]
3.
Tim Hunter [22]
4.
Tiger Williams [30]
5.
Shawn Antoski [65]
[42] Well, you are half right (but which half?). Return to question 5 [15]
[43] No, he played somewhere else ... but where? Return to question 10 [52]
[44] It just seems like we play them a lot. Return to question 4 [49]
[45] He held the record for a time, but the record is currently held by another netminder. Return to question 1. [1]
[46] He invented towel power, but he's not the answer to this question. Return to question 7 [60]
[47] That answer is just plain wrong in so many ways. Return to question 3 [23]
[48] Absolutely. The Canucks won games 5, 6 and 7 in overtime. Advance to question 3 [23]
[49] Question 4: Which team have the Canucks played the most regular season games against in their history?
1.
Los Angeles Kings [3]
2.
Buffalo Sabres [19]
3.
Calgary Flames [64]
4.
Toronto Maple Leafs [44]
5.
Edmonton Oilers [63]
[50] Well done. Move on to question 6 [35]
[51] An all-around nice guy, but not the answer to this question. Return to question 6 [35]
[52] One defenseman for another. Makes sense, but it didn't happen. Return to question 10 [56]
[53] Close, very close. But still wrong. Return to question 4 [49]
[54] He shoots! He... misses. Return to question 9 [39]
[55] Of course you knew that. He's regarded as one of the best Bruins ever. Proceed to question 6 [35]
[56] Question 10: How did the Canucks obtain Jyrki Lumme?
1.
On waivers from Minnesota [9]
2.
As a sixth round draft pick [16]
3.
In a trade with Montreal for a draft pick [26]
4.
In a trade with Pittsburgh for Doug Smith [38]
5.
In a trade with St. Louis for Harold Snepsts [52]
[57] You're way wide with this attempt. Return to question 7 [60]
[58] Not a bad guess, but incorrect. Return to question 1 [1]
[59] Okay. So you think Shawn is still a Canuck. Hmmm... Return to question 3 [23]
[60] Question 7: Who has coached the most Canuck playoff games?
1.
Harry Neale [2]
2.
Rick Ley [20]
3.
Pat Quinn [33]
4.
Roger Neilson [46]
5.
Bob McCammon [57]
[61] The Canucks weren't that lucky. Return to question 2 [13]
[62] He played most of his games in Vancouver, but not his 1000th. Return to question 6 [35]]
[63] They haven't been around that long. Return to question 4 [49]
[64] If you include the Atlanta games, you're right. But I don't. Return to question 4 [49]
[65] Very good. He switched from 31 so the coaches wouldn't think he was a goalie. Proceed to question 9 [39]

Answer to bonus question: The World Hockey Association (WHA) -- not to be confused with the Western Hockey League (WHL) -- was founded in the early 1970's. Teams took to the ice for the 1972-73 season in several cities, including Philadelphia. After one season, the Philadelphia Blazers were purchased by Vancouver interests and moved to the Pacific Coliseum.

The team retained its name and the "Vancouver Blazers" were born. The Canucks (representing the NHL) and the Blazers (representing the WHA) competed for the hearts and pocket books of hockey fans in Vancouver for two seasons. The Canucks emerged as a playoff contender and a .500 hockey team in 1974-75, pushing the Blazers out of town.

The Blazers moved to Calgary for the 1975-76 season where they were renamed the "Cowboys" and lasted two more seasons.

Content copyright 2001-2010 David Marchak
This page last updated July 11, 2010