British Columbia Wildlife Watch - Lower Mainland Region (Greater Vancouver Viewing Sites)
copyright © A.L. Mol  2003
Binoculars Seagull Flying

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Within the Greater Vancouver area of the Lower Mainland Region, the following 44 viewing sites are identified.

       Burnaby-Vancouver (3 sites)
       Coquitlam-Port Coquitlam-Port Moody (Tri-Cities) (6 sites)
       Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows (12 sites)
       North Vancouver-West Vancouver-Bowen Island (6 sites)
       Richmond-Delta (10 sites)
       Surrey-Langley (8 sites)

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Burnaby-Vancouver


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   Coquitlam-Port Coquitlam-Port Moody (Tri-Cities)


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   Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows
    Detailed Location Map   (click here for a map showing the location of the following 12 viewing sites)
    WARNING - this will take some time to load!!


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   North Vancouver-West Vancouver-Bowen Island


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   Richmond-Delta


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   Surrey-Langley


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   Alouette River Dykes

The dykes along the Alouette River are popular with local residents. On foot or by bicycle, visitors will see a variety of wildlife. The dyke tops provide views of the river and adjacent farmlands.

Viewing Highlights - In winter, watch for Bald Eagles and occasionally Trumpeter Swans in the fields. Great Blue Herons and hawks are common throughout the year. Waterfowl use the river corridor and some nest along the river banks. Morning and early evening periods from spring through late summer are best for songbirds. Coyotes may be seen in the fields.

Directions - There are many access points to the dykes. The best parking is located at the Alouette River bridge on Harris Road. From Lougheed Highway (Highway 7) in Pitt Meadows, turn north onto Harris Road and continue to the bridge and parking area. You can also access the dykes at the corner of Dewdney Trunk Road and 210th Street - see the directions for the Alouette River Heronry site.

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Alouette River Heronry

In the Lower Mainland, Great Blue Herons are a common sight throughout the year. These prehistoric looking birds nest communally in large deciduous trees. Nesting herons are easily disturbed by visitors getting too close to the nest site. This often results in nest abandonment, even when young are still in the nest.

Viewing Highlights - Heron activity begins in March when the adults begin claiming nests. They are most visible before the leaves are on the trees. Once the young are born, adult herons can be observed all day long entering and leaving the colony. Viewing will usually continue to late July.

Directions - From Lougheed Highway (Highway 7) in Pitt Meadows turn north onto Harris Road and then right onto Dewdney Trunk Road. Continue straight to 210th Street where the road turns right at the dyke. There is a small parking lot and access onto the Alouette River dyke. From here you can look across and see the heronry. The heronry is located on private property across the river.

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Ambleside Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

City of West Vancouver, Parks and Recreation Department
750 - 7th Street, West Vancouver, B.C. Canada V7V 3T3
phone: (604) 925-7200
fax:

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   Bear Creek Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Bell-Irving Hatchery

This facility is located in Kanaka Creek Regional Park. It is open to visitors year round. Several trails lead along the creek from the hatchery parking area. To arrange a group tour contact GVRD Parks at (604) 530-4983.

Viewing Highlights - A series of ponds, tanks and troughs contain Chum Salmon and Coho Salmon. The hatchery building contains some displays. Several special public events are held at the hatchery throughout the year, including the Chum Salmon fish release in late April.

Directions - From Dewdney Trunk Road turn south onto 256th Street. Cross the bridge over Kanaka Creek and turn left into the hatchery parking area.

For more information contact -

Bell-Irving Hatchery
11450 - 256th Street, Maple Ridge, B.C. Canada V2W 1H1
phone: (604) 462-8643
fax:

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  Blackie Spit

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

City of Surrey, Parks and Recreation Department
7542 - 132nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3W 4M7
phone: (604) 501-5050
fax:

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   Boundary Bay Regional Park

Located on the western shore of Boundary Bay, an area of international significance to migrating and wintering birds, the park contains a range of habitats important to wildlife, including salt and fresh water marshes, tidal mud flats, grassland, sand dunes and sandy shorelines.

The park offers a range of recreational opportunities, including walking, birding, nature study, jogging, cycling, picnicking and swimming. There are several trails, a boardwalk and two viewing structures located in the park.

To prevent the disturbance of wildlife and the destruction of fragile habitats, dogs must be kept on a leash at all times while in the park. Many bird species nest on the ground in the sandy and grassland areas, so please stay on the designated trails.

Viewing Highlights - This park offers excellent birding, including opportunities to view Brant during spring migration, a diverse range of waterfowl species during migrations and the winter months, and large flocks of shorebirds, especially Dunlin. Other waterbirds are common, including loons, grebes and cormorants. Many songbirds visit the park, and spring provides great choruses.

Coyote are often seen in the open grasslands, and Harbour Seal frequent the shoreline waters.

Directions - Centennial Beach Area - From Highway 17 in Delta, turn south onto 56th Street in Tsawwassen. Continue to 12th Avenue and turn left. Limited parking is available at the junction of 12th Avenue and Boundary Bay Road. To access Centennial Beach and Cammidge House, continue right along Boundary Bay Road and turn left at the park entrance sign. Parking and washroom facilities are available. Boundary Bay Dyke Trail - From Highway 17, turn east onto Highway 10 (Ladner Trunk Road). Turn right onto 64th, 72nd or 104th Streets and continue to the designated parking sites near the dyke. Respect farmers' needs for dyke access - parking is not permitted at the foot of 88th, 96th or 112th Streets. Parking restrictions are strictly enforced. Washroom facilities are available at the Delta Heritage Airpark on 104th Street.

For more information contact -

Greater Vancouver Regional District, GVRD Parks
4339 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5H 4G8
phone: (604) 432-6350
fax: (604) 432-6296

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   Boundary Bay Wildlife Management Area

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Bryden Lagoon Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

City of Langley, Parks Department
5549 - 204th Street, Langley, B.C. Canada V3A 1Z4
phone: (604) 530-3131
fax:

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   Burnaby Lake Regional Park

This 300 hectare park is located in central Burnaby, and supports a healthy second growth forest with patches of conifers and a few notable mature Sitka spruce. The marshy edges, forest and lake are important feeding and nesting habitats for wildlife. Still Creek, which drains much of east Vancouver, flows eastward into Burnaby lake. The Brunette River flows out of the lake into the Fraser River.

In addition to viewing wildlife, this park offers other recreational opportunities. A level, soft surface, 10 km trail circles the lake. There are shorter trail loops at the Nature House on Piper Avenue and at the Glencarin Drive trailhead. A canoe launch at the end of Piper Avenue provides boat access to about 10 km of shoreline. The Burnaby Equestrian Centre, located on Avalon Avenue, provides access to 5 km of horse/hiking trails. Fishing, skating and swimming are not recommended.

Viewing Highlights - The habitats of the park are frequented by many waterbirds, especially ducks and geese. Many of these species nest on the lake, and broods of young are often visible as early as March. Common species include Canada Goose, Wood Duck, Mallard, Canvasback, Northern Pintail, Common Goldeneye and Gadwall. The lake edges and forests are home to a great diversity of songbirds, woodpeckers, swallows. Sping brings loud morning and early evening choruses.

The lake is home to populations of Beaver and Muskrat. Douglas' Squirrel and Northern Flying Squirrel are common in the forests. Bullfrogs and Pacific Treefrogs live here, and their choruses can be quite spectacular, especially in the spring. Many butterflies find suitable habitat in the park.

Directions - There are three main access points to the park.

    Piper Avenue: This entrance can be reached off Highway 7 (Lougheed Highway). Travel west past Gaglardi Way or east past Kensington Avenue, and turn south onto Brighton Avenue. Turn right onto Winston Street, and finally left onto Piper Avenue.
    Cariboo Dam: Also reached from Highway 7 (Lougheed Highway), turn south onto Brighton Avenue and then left onto Winston Street. Then turn right onto Cariboo Road and cross the railroad tracks. Turn right onto Avalon Avenue at the equestrian centre sign.
    Glencarin Drive Trailhead: From Highway 7 (Lougheed Highway) take the Kensington Avenue exit south and get into the left lane. At LAurel Street turn left, and then right onto Sperling Avenue which becomes Glencarin Drive. Continue to the end of the road past the Wildlife Rescue Association facility.

For more information contact -

Greater Vancouver Regional District, GVRD Parks
4339 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5H 4G8
phone: (604) 432-6350
fax: (604) 432-6296

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   Campbell Valley Regional Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Greater Vancouver Regional District, GVRD Parks
4339 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5H 4G8
phone: (604) 432-6350
fax: (604) 432-6296

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   Capilano River Hatchery

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Capilano River Hatchery
4500 Capilano Road, North Vancouver, B.C. Canada V7R 4L3
phone: (604) 660-1790
fax: (604) 666-1949
e-mail

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   Colony Farm Regional Park

Colony Farm Regional park offers excellent bird viewing opportunities. Located along the Coquitlam River, the park contains a range of habitats important to wildlife, including resident, migrating and wintering species. Of particular importance is the large amount of old-field habitat.

The park offers many recreational opportunities, including walking, birding, nature study, jogging and cycling. To prevent disturbance to wildlife and the destruction of fragile habitats, dogs must be kept on a leash at all times while in the park. many bird species nest on the ground in the tall grass, so please stay on the dyke trails.

Within the park, there is no bridge across the Coquitlam River.

Viewing Highlights - The habitats of Colony Farm provide nesting and feeding habitats for a wide range of birds, especially raptors and songbirds. The wooded areas are good places to look for woodpeckers and chickadees. The old-field habitat is frequented by Short-eared Owl. Many waterfowl species are seen in the river and main ditches.

Directions - The park is located along both sides of the Coquitlam River from the Mary Hill Bypass north to Coquitlam Indian Reserve #2. From Highway 7 (Lougheed Highway) in Coquitlam, just north of the Cape Horn Interchange, turn south onto Colony Farm Road and continue to the parking area at the end of the road. The Port Coquitlam dykes can be reached from the southern end of Shaughnessy Street.

For more information contact -

Greater Vancouver Regional District, GVRD Parks
4339 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5H 4G8
phone: (604) 432-6350
fax: (604) 432-6296

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   Crippen Regional Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Greater Vancouver Regional District, GVRD Parks
4339 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5H 4G8
phone: (604) 432-6350
fax: (604) 432-6296

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   Cypress Provincial Park

Cypress Provincial Park is located in the North Shore Mountains above West Vancouver, and extends beyond the Lions to Deeks Lake. Established in 1975, this 2996 hectare park is named after the yellow cypress, a dominant tree species in the higher elevation areas. Roadside stops on the access road allow panoramic views of Vancouver and the Strait of Georgia, from Mount Baker to Vancouver Island.

The park's diverse natural areas include several types of old-growth forest, some mixed second-growth forest, sub-alpine wetlands, rocky bluffs and mountain-top plateaus. Within the park boundaries there are old fire-scarred areas, and some areas that were logged prior to park establishment.

Recreational opportunities range from hiking, picnicking, wildlife viewing and nature study to snowshoeing and all forms of skiing. There are excellent hiking opportunities, including the Baden-Powell Trail and the rugged Howe Sound Crest Trail. The 2 km wheelchair accessible Yew Lake Trail loops through old-growth forest. Caution: Black bears and cougars frequent the park and may be encountered on hiking trails and in open areas.

Viewing Highlights - This park offers good hawk watching during migration periods. The forests are home to many woodpeckers, chickadees, nuthatch, Brown Creeper and songbirds.

Easily viewed mammals include Douglas' Squirrel, Yellow-pine Chipmunk and Common Pika.

Directions - Road access is from Highway 1 (Trans Canada Highway) in West Vancouver. Take Exit #8 and follow the park directional signs. The park can also be accessed by bus routes to trailheads in neighbouring communities. For a Bus to Hiking Trail brochure contact the Federation of Mountain Clubs of BC [(604) 737-3053].

For more information contact -

BC Parks, Lower Mainland District
1610 Mount Seymour Drive, North Vancouver, B.C. Canada V7G 2R9
phone: (604) 924-2200
fax: (604) 924-2244
e-mail

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   Deas Island Regional Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Greater Vancouver Regional District, GVRD Parks
4339 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5H 4G8
phone: (604) 432-6350
fax: (604) 432-6296

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   DeBouville Slough

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   George C. Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary

The George C. Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary, a part of the Alaksen National Wildlife Area, is located on Westham Island in Delta. It is situated on the Fraser River Estuary, just west of the South Arm Marshes Wildlife Management Area. The Sanctuary contains habitats important for migrating birds, including tidal salt water mud flats, fresh water, brackish and salt marshes and upland fields. These habitats attract a wide range of bird species.

The George C. Reifel Migratory Bird sanctuary is home to special Snow Goose events in November, with most events planned for the weekends.

Viewing Highlights - The Sanctuary is one of the best sites for seeing a wide range of species, as well as rare species. During the late fall and early winter months there are about 25,000 Lesser Snow Goose from Wrangell Island in the general area. The sanctuary is great for viewing waterbirds year round, raptors, shorebirds, woodpeckers, and songbirds of all types. Be sure to ask at the gift shop for the location of the current unusual sightings. This may include a roosting owl or the nest sight.

Directions - The Sanctuary is located on Westham Island about 8 km west of Ladner (Delta). From the junction of Highways 10 and 17, follow Highway 10 (Ladner Trunk Road) west. Continue on this road as it becomes 47A Avenue and then River Road. Look for the Sanctuary sign at Westham Island Road and turn right, crossing the Canoe Pass Bridge. Follow this road to the Sanctuary entrance.

The Sanctuary is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day. There is an admission charge to the Sanctuary for non-members. The balance of the Alaksen National Wildlife Area is open to visitors during business hours Monday to Friday (except holidays). Please check in and out at the Canadian Wildlife Service office. While much of Westham Island is accessible by roads and dykes, please respect private property.

For more information contact -

British Columbia Waterfowl Society, George C. Reifel Migratory Bird Sanctuary
5191 Robertson Road, Delta, B.C. Canada V4K 3N2
phone: (604) 946-6980
fax:
or
Canadian Wildlife Service, Pacific and Yukon Region
P.O. Box 340, Delta, B.C. Canada V4K 3Y3
phone: (604) 666-0143
fax: (604) 946-7022

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   Golden Ears Provincial Park

Golden Ears Provincial Park is located in north Maple Ridge, about 48 km east of Vancouver. From its southern boundary, the park extends 55 km northward through mountain wilderness to the southern boundary of Garibaldi Provincial Park.

This 55,594 hectare park is rich in human history. In the 1920's the click of the faller's axes, the rasp of crosscut saws and the puff of steam engines were common sounds as massive trees up to 4 m in diameter were felled, bucked and hauled on flat cars to log dumps on the Fraser River. Visitors can find abandoned steam donkey sleds, railroad rails and steel cables along many of the trails.

Recreational opportunities include walking, swimming, wildlife viewing, picnicking, camping, horseback riding, fishing, canoeing and boating. Many trails are found throughout the park.

Viewing Highlights - There are good birding opportunities throughout the park. In the main areas of the park look and listen for Brown-headed Cowbird, Red-breasted Sapsucker, Swainson's Thrush and Steller's Jay. Osprey may be seen over Alouette Lake. Douglas Squirrels and Yellow-pine Chipmunks frequent the campgrounds. Mountain Goats are infrequently seen on high mountain rock faces. Trails leading into the sub-alpine areas provide viewing opportunities for Blue Grouse and Hermit Thrush. The forests are home to many birds, including woodpeckers, thrushes, juncos and jays. Douglas Squirrels and Yellow-pine Chipmunks are common in the campground and picnic areas. Mike Lake is a good place to look for waterfowl, vireos and warblers. Flycatching birds, including Cedar Waxwing, Willow Flycatcher and swallows, may be observed during the summer months in the drowned trees around the lake. The Spirea Nature Trail area is also good for flycatching birds.

Directions - The main access point to this park is from Highway 7 (Lougheed Highway) or Dewdney Trunk Road in Maple Ridge. Follow the park directional signs north on 232nd Street, and then east onto Fern Crescent which leads directly into the park. The local horse trail network leads into the park. The west side of the park runs along the east side of Pitt Lake and is accessible by boat from the boat launch at Grant Narrows Regional Park in the Pitt-Addington Marsh Wildlife Management Area.

For more information contact -

BC Parks, Lower Mainland District
1610 Mount Seymour Drive, North Vancouver, B.C. Canada V7G 2R9
phone: (604) 924-2200
fax: (604) 924-2244
e-mail

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   Golden Ears Provincial Park - Mike Lake

Located along the park's boundary with the UBC Research Forest, the Mike Lake area is located a short drive off the main park road. A trail leads around the lake (about 45 minutes round-trip) and provides good views of the open water and marsh areas.

Viewing Highlights - The lake area is home to a small population of Beaver. Look for recently removed trees and other vegetation. Common Loon and Pied-billed Grebe are common winter visitors when the lake is not frozen over. Flycatching birds are observed in spring and summer, including Cedar Waxwing, Willow Flycatcher and several species of swallow.

Directions - From Lougheed Highway (Highway 7) turn north onto 228th Street. At Dewdney Trunk Road turn right and then left at 232nd Street. Follow the park signs onto Fern Crescent and continue to the park. Once in the park follow the signs to Mike Lake.

For more information contact -

BC Parks, Lower Mainland District
1610 Mount Seymour Drive, North Vancouver, B.C. Canada V7G 2R9
phone: (604) 924-2200
fax: (604) 924-2244
e-mail

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   Golden Ears Provincial Park - Spirea Nature Trail

Boardwalk and trail loops provide access around the bog areas.

Viewing Highlights - Summer visitors include Cedar Waxwing, MacGillivray's Warbler, Song Sparrow and several species of swallow. Listen for woodpeckers and chickadees. In addition to birds, the bog is home to many interesting plants, including the insect-eating sundew plant.

Directions - From Lougheed Highway (Highway 7) turn north onto 228th Street. At Dewdney Trunk Road turn right and then left at 232nd Street. Follow the park signs onto Fern Crescent and continue to the park. This area is located along the main park road just south of the Alouette Lake day use area. There is a small parking lot.

For more information contact -

BC Parks, Lower Mainland District
1610 Mount Seymour Drive, North Vancouver, B.C. Canada V7G 2R9
phone: (604) 924-2200
fax: (604) 924-2244
e-mail

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   Indian Arm Provincial Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

BC Parks, Lower Mainland District
1610 Mount Seymour Drive, North Vancouver, B.C. Canada V7G 2R9
phone: (604) 924-2200
fax: (604) 924-2244
e-mail

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   Iona Beach Regional Park

Iona Island, located just north of Sea Island and the Vancouver International Airport, has long been recognized across North America as one of the best places to study shorebirds. The riverbank, Fraser River tidal flat, marsh, grassland and beach habitats attract a wide range of birds, including many rare and vagrant species.

Iona Beach Regional Park is located on Iona Island, and is flanked by 1200 hectares of intertidal foreshore.

There are many long walks and bicycle rides that can be taken along the jetties.

Viewing Highlights - The Iona Island area is an excellent spot for birding, with over 280 species seen here. Waterbirds are plentiful throughout the year, including loons, grebes, cormorants, herons, geese, ducks, goldeneyes, scoters and mergansers. Common raptors include Red-tailed Hawk and Bald Eagle. while many songbirds may be seen, shorebird viewing is excellent. Many rare species have been recorded, including Spoonbill Sandpiper, Rufous-necked Stint, Little Stint and Curlew Sandpiper.

Directions - Refer to a detailed Vancouver and area road map.

    From Richmond: From Bridgeport Road westbound, travel over the Sea Island swing bridge and immediately turn right onto Grauer Road. Follow the regional park directional signs to Iona Beach Regional Park.
    From Vancouver: Travel southbound on the Arthur Laing Bridge and take the Richmond exit. Turn left at the first traffic light and then just after this turn, turn left again. At the stop sign go straight onto Grauer Road and follow the regional park directional signs to Iona Beach Regional Park.
    From Surrey/White Rock/North Delta: Take Highway 91 northbound, cross the Alex Fraser Bridge and turn left at the first light. Travel along this "Richmond Connector" to Shell Road, turn right and travel northbound to Bridgeport Road. Turn left towards the Airport, proceed over the Sea Island swing bridge, and immediately turn right onto Grauer Road. Follow the regional park directional signs to Iona Beach Regional Park.

For more information contact -

Greater Vancouver Regional District, GVRD Parks
4339 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5H 4G8
phone: (604) 432-6350
fax: (604) 432-6296

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   Kanaka Creek Regional Park - Fish Fence

The fish fence is located on Kanaka Creek in Kanaka Creek Regional Park. You can participate in a special event at the fish fence during the annual return of spawning salmon. Return of the Salmon is a free event held in October.

Viewing Highlights - Throughout the year, this section of Kanaka Creek is visited by Great Blue Heron, ducks and Belted Kingfisher. In October, Chum Salmon and Coho Salmon are migrating upstream to spawn. A counting fence allows Bell-Irving Hatchery staff to count the number of returning fish and to remove some to provide hatchery stock.

Directions - From Lougheed Highway (Highway 7) turn north onto 240th Street. Cross the bridge over Kanaka Creek and turn left onto Kanaka Creek Road. A small parking lot is located on the left.

For more information contact -

East Area Office, GVRD Parks
1558 - 200th Street, Langley, B.C. Canada V2Z 1W5
phone: (604) 530-4983
fax:

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   Kanaka Creek Regional Park - Riverfront

This portion of Kanaka Creek Regional Park is located along the estuary section of Kanaka Creek immediately south of the Lougheed Highway (Highway 7). A wide trail along Kanaka Creek to the Fraser River is accessed from a large parking area. At the Fraser River turn right and continue over the bridge and along a loop trail that leads through several habitat types, including open meadow and cottonwood forest. In the 1920's, the mouth of Kanaka Creek was home to the log dumping facility of the Abernathy and Lougheed Logging Company. Steam trains loaded with logs from nearby lands, including what is now Golden Ears Provincial Park, came to this site.

Viewing Highlights - Viewing opportunities vary throughout the year. Great Blue Heron, Belted Kingfisher, Black-capped Chickadee and Canada Goose are common. Bufflehead, Common Merganser, Mallard and a few Hooded Merganser are best seen in the winter months. Spring and summer are the best times to watch for woodpeckers, swallows and other song bird species. It is unusual for a careful observer to visit this area without seeing some birds.

Directions - From Lougheed Highway (Highway 7) turn south onto 240th Street, cross the railroad tracks, and continue westward to the park entrance. There is a large parking area with washroom facilities.

For more information contact -

East Area Office, GVRD Parks
1558 - 200th Street, Langley, B.C. Canada V2Z 1W5
phone: (604) 530-4983
fax:

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   Maplewood Flats

Maplewood Flats is located on the north shore of Burrard Inlet about 2 km east of the Second Narrows Bridge. This 96 hectare area is composed of mud flats (over 90%), and of some salt marsh. Several disused log pilings provide perching and nesting habitat.

Upland from the intertidal area are the Port of Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver Wildlife Conservation Areas. These conservation areas total about 30 hectares, and are managed by WBT Wild Bird Trust of British Columbia with supervision from Environment Canada.

Maplewood Flats is the site of the annual Return of the Osprey Festival held in early June.

Viewing Highlights - This site provides good opportunities to view a wide range of waterbirds, especially during winter and both migration periods. Loons, grebes, Canada Goose, ducks, goldeneye, scoters and mergansers are present in large numbers. During migrations many shorebirds are seen hear, including yellowlegs, sandpipers, dowitchers and phalarope.

A long list of woodpeckers, swallows, chickadees, wrens, kinglets and other songbirds may be viewed in the upland areas.

The marine waters are frequented by Harbour Seal and occasionally by Northern Sea Lion. During the spring and summer months visitors may find many easily identified butterflies.

Directions - Access to Maplewood Flats is through the parking area of the Pacific Environmental Science Centre on Dollarton Highway.

    Highway 1 (northbound): From Highway 1 (Trans Canada Highway) northbound over the Second Narrows Bridge, take the first exit (Deep Cove - Exit #23B) onto Dollarton Highway and continue eastward. Look for the binocular logo directional signs. The site is on the right about 2 km from the bridge.
    Highway 1 (southbound): From Highway 1 (Trans Canada Highway) southbound take the Mount Seymour Drive exit (Exit #22). At the stop sign turn left, then at the traffic light turn right onto Mount Seymour Drive. Look for the binocular logo directional signs. At the next light turn right onto Riverside Drive, and finally left onto Dollarton Highway at the stop sign.

For more information contact -

WBT Wild Bird Trust of British Columbia
#124 - 1489 Marine Drive, West Vancouver, B.C. Canada V7T 1B8
phone: (604) 924-2581
fax: (604) 924-2581

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   Minnekhada Regional Park
    bird checklist

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Greater Vancouver Regional District, GVRD Parks
4339 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5H 4G8
phone: (604) 432-6350
fax: (604) 432-6296

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   Musqueam Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Musqueam Fisheries
6820 Salish Drive, Vancouver, B.C. Canada V6N 4C2
phone: (604) 263-4649
fax:

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   Noons Creek Hatchery

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Port Moody Ecological Society
300 Ioco Road, Port Moody, B.C. Canada V3H 2V7
phone: (604) 469-9106
fax: (604) 469-9106
e-mail

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   Pitt Meadows Farmlands

The open farmlands in and around the Pitt Meadows Airport provide good viewing.

Viewing Highlights - During the winter months many species of waterfowl may be viewed in flooded fields, occasionally including Trumpeter Swan. This area is best for hawk watching, especially Northern Harrier, Rough-legged Hawk and Red-tailed Hawk. During the summer months, Short-eared Owl are often seen hunting the open fields during daylight hours.

Directions - From Lougheed Highway (Highway 7) turn south onto Harris Road. Cross the railroad tracks and turn right onto Ford Road. At the junction of Ford Road and Baynes Road, turn left and continue to the main airport parking area which provides access onto a dyke along the Fraser River. Alternatively, from the junction, you can drive through the farmlands, ending up at Lougheed Highway via the Ford Road Detour, Woolridge Road and Kennedy Road. Please remember to stay on the roads and to keep off private property. When stopping or parking on local roads, pull well off the road and do not block driveways.

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Pitt Polder Farmlands

The farmlands located in the northern portion of Pitt Meadows are known as the Pitt Polder. Portions of these lands are often covered with water from late fall through early spring. This habitat attracts many wildlife species.

Viewing Highlights - Coyotes are often seen in the fields. During the winter months, especially December and January, Trumpeter Swans are commonly observed feeding in farm fields. Fields covered with water are used by many species of waterfowl. Throughout the year, Northern Harrier and Red-tailed Hawk may be seen. In spring and early summer watch for Sandhill Crane.

Directions - There is road access throughout the farmlands of the Pitt Polder. From Lougheed Highway (Highway 7) turn north onto Harris Road. Continue to McNeil Road and turn right. At Rennie Road turn left and continue north towards the Pitt-Addington Marsh Wildlife Management Area. From Harris Road you can also turn right onto Dewdney Trunk Road and then left onto Neaves Road. Neaves Road becomes Rennie Road. Please remember to stay on the roads and to keep off private property. When stopping or parking on local roads, pull well off the road and do not block driveways.

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Pitt River Dykes

There are many kilometres of dykes along the Pitt River. From the dyke tops there are views of the river, adjacent farmlands and nearby mountains.

Viewing Highlights - Numerous Osprey nests are located along the Pitt River. Throughout the spring and early summer look for these nests located on top of pilings. Hawks are common, including Red-tailed Hawk and Rough-legged Hawk. From spring to fall watch for Short-eared Owls. Winter is best for Bald Eagles. Watch for waterfowl, woodpeckers and songbirds. Coyotes may be seen in the fields.

Directions - There are several main access points. For access north of the Pitt River bridge there is limited parking off Dewdney Trunk Road at Lougheed Highway. For access south of the Pitt River bridge there is parking along Kennedy Road. Another access point is at the north end of Harris Road. The best parking is found at the Alouette River bridge on Harris Road - see Alouette River Dykes site. Remember to never leave valuables unattended anywhere in your vehicle.

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Pitt-Addington Marsh Wildlife Management Area

The management area is 2972 hectares in size, and is managed to protect wildlife and habitats. The area consists of four separate units that include primarily marsh, wetlands and tidal freshwater mud flats, plus some forested uplands.

The 1459 hectare Pitt Unit is primarily dyked marsh and wetlands, as well as some upland forests. It contains the Pitt Polder Ecological Reserve (88 hectares) managed by BC Parks, and Grant Narrows Regional Park (6.5 hectares) managed by GVRD Parks. The park is management area lands that are leased to the Greater Vancouver Regional District for a regional park.

The 283 hectares of Addington Marsh are leased to the British Columbia Ministry of Environment by The Nature Trust of British Columbia.

Located at the southern end of Pitt Lake, the Pitt Lake Unit contains 1140 hectares of tidal freshwater mud flat. The sediments that form the mud flats are Fraser River silts carried upstream and deposited by the tidal movements of the Pitt River.

The MacIntrye Creek Unit was added in March 2001. It is located immediately north of the Addington Unit and is 90 ha in size.

Viewing Highlights - There is good wildlife viewing at the Pitt-Addington Marsh Wildlife Management Area throughout the year. The management area provides year round habitat for waterfowl, including Canada Goose, Wood Duck and Gadwall. While some species nest in the area, the best viewing periods are during the spring and fall migrations and during the winter months. Trumpeter Swan are common during the winter months, and may be seen in the management area in the marshes, out on the tidal mud flats or in Widgeon Slough.

Many raptor species may be viewed, including the many Osprey that nest on piling along the Pitt River. The mid April through September period is best. During the winter months look for wintering Bald Eagle. Northern Harrier and Red-tailed Hawk are common.

The marshes are home to many other birds including American Bittern, Virginia Rail, Sora and many species of songbirds. The marshes of the management area are one of only three known nesting sites in the Lower Mainland for Sandhill Crane. A few cranes may be visible between April and September. Listen for the crane's low pitched garoo call.

In addition to birds, look for frogs, Beaver and Muskrat. Frog choruses are best from April to June. The activities of Beaver are especially visible throughout the area, particularly along the Nature Dyke Trail and from the Nature Dyke viewing tower. Many of the remaining trees on the interior dykes have been protected with wire mesh to prevent Beaver damage.

Directions - The Pitt and Addington Marsh Units are accessible by land. The Pitt Lake Unit is only accessed by boat.

    Pitt Unit: There is a large paved parking area at Grant Narrows Regional Park. From Highway 7 (Lougheed Highway) in Pitt Meadows turn north onto Harris Road. Continue north to McNeil Road and turn right. Follow McNeil Road to its junction with Neaves Road where you turn left and head north to Pitt Lake and Grant Narrows.
    Addington Marsh: The best access to Addington marsh is through Minnekhada Regional Park. From Highway 7 (Lougheed Highway) in Port Coquitlam, turn north onto Coast Meridian Road and follow the green and yellow regional park signs. From Coast Meridian Road, cross Prairie Avenue, and continue to Apel Drive where you turn right. Continue to Victoria Drive and turn right. When Victoria Drive splits turn left. Victoria Drive then becomes Quarry Road. The park's parking lot is located on the right just after the road becomes gravel. Use the park map to find your way along the trails to Addington Marsh.

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Richmond Nature Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Richmond Nature Park Society, Richmond Nature Park
11851 Westminster Highway, Richmond, B.C. Canada V6X 1B4
phone: (604) 718-6188
fax: (604) 718-6189
e-mail

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   Roberts Bank (incl. Brunswick Point)

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Sandheads

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Serpentine Wildlife Area

The Serpentine Wildlife Area is 106 hectares in size, with approximately 80 hectares of dyked freshwater marsh, and 4 hectares of undyked salt marsh. There is a public trail network along selected interior dykes, and along the Serpentine River. There are three covered viewing towers that provide visitors with excellent views of the upland agricultural, old field, marsh and river habitats.

The system of interior dykes allows for the adjustment of water levels in different portions of the marsh. Seasonal water draw-downs, combined with specific vegetation plantings, have resulted in the establishment of productive waterfowl habitat, particularly for nesting and wintering birds. Areas of old field habitat provide foraging opportunities for raptors. Hedgerows located between the marsh compartments provide habitat for songbirds, as well as perching sites for raptors. Through careful management, agricultural activities and wildlife use co-exist in the lands immediately south of 44th Avenue.

Viewing Highlights - This area provides excellent viewing opportunities throughout the year. Waterbirds and shorebirds frequent the area, and many waterfowl species utilize the marshes for breeding, for wintering and during migration. Located in close proximity to Boundary Bay Wildlife Management Area increases the changes of seeing a greater diversity of bird species. During high tide periods in Boundary Bay, many birds move into the Serpentine Wildlife Area.

Great Blue Heron, cormorants, Short-eared Owl and songbirds are common. Many hawk species use this area. Northern Harrier and Red-tailed Hawk may be seen year round. Rough-legged Hawk, Sharp-shinned Hawk and Cooper's Hawk are most visible during the spring and fall migration periods.

Common mammals species include Muskrat in the marshes, Harbour seal in the river, and Coyote on land. Bullfrog choruses are heard in the spring, especially at dusk.

Directions - Road access to Serpentine Wildlife Area is from 44th Avenue, west off Highway 99A (King George Highway) just north of Highway 99. Many of the interior dykes are closed year round to public access. Please respect "no access" signs. Dogs must be kept on a leash at all times when visiting the area.

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Shoreline Park

The Shoreline Park area lies within the City of Port Moody at the head of Burrard Inlet. While only 40 hectares (125 acres) in size, this small park contains a remarkable variety of habitats with a long, diverse list of wildlife and plant species.

The trail around the end of the Inlet from Rocky Point Park to Old Orchard Park is 3 km in length one way. In between, the trail passes through dense coniferous woods, open mixed and deciduous woodland, salmonberry and twinberry shrubs, and thickets of crabapples. The trail crosses two salmon-bearing streams. Many boardwalk and trail openings provide excellent views of the extensive tidal flats.

There is little natural habitat left on Burrard Inlet, and the only similar site is Maplewood Flats in North Vancouver. Past human activities in this area include a brick factory, parts of which are still visible on the north side of the park.

Viewing Highlights - The waters of Burrard Inlet are utilized by many water birds during the winter, including loons, ducks, geese and mergansers. Woodpeckers and chickadees are common year round. The spring and summer is best for songbirds.

Directions - The main access to the Shoreline Park area is from St. Johns Street in Port Moody. Look for the binocular logo directional signs, and turn north onto Moody Street. Follow the overpass around to the left. At the stop sign turn left onto Murray Street, and then left into the parking area for Rocky Point Park. The trail begins along the waterfront, and initially leads east, eventually turning north and finally west. The trail ends at Old Orchard Park.

For more information contact -

City of Port Moody, Parks, Recreation and Culture Department
300 Ioco Road, Port Moody, B.C. Canada V3H 2V7
phone: (604) 469-4555
fax:

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   South Arm Marshes Wildlife Management Area

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Stanley Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

City of Vancouver, Parks and Recreation Board
2099 Beach Avenue, Vancouver, B.C. Canada V6Z 1Z4
phone: (604) 257-8400
fax:

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   Sturgeon Bank

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

BC Environment, Lower Mainland Region
10470 - 152nd Street, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 0Y3
phone: (604) 582-5200
fax: (604) 930-7119

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   Tynehead Regional Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Greater Vancouver Regional District, GVRD Parks
4339 Kingsway, Burnaby, B.C. Canada V5H 4G8
phone: (604) 432-6350
fax: (604) 432-6296

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   Williams Park

Viewing Highlights -

Directions -

For more information contact -

Serpentine Enhancement Society
16585 - 96th Avenue, Surrey, B.C. Canada V3R 5W7
phone: (604) 589-9127
fax: