Mill Creek Ravine

By Dominic Lloyd

Tuesday, May 11, 2004

On May 11 2004, we met at the Muttart Conservatory and walked along Mill Creek Ravine. Starting from Muttart Conservatory, we crossed the footbridge over Conners Road and then walked up the ravine to the second footbridge where we crossed the creek and returned to the Muttart. There we had coffee at the restaurant, and admired a mural by Alex Janvier, as well as some paintings by Lucy (the elephant).

Edmonton Skyline from Muttart Conservatory

Edmonton Skyline from Muttart Conservatory
Muttart Conservatory

Muttart Conservatory

Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific Railway

The Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific Railway ran through Mill Creek and crossed the North Saskatchewan River via the Low Level Bridge. The photo shows the first train to cross the bridge (October 20, 1902). Eventually the line was extended to Stony Plain Road and 123 Street (in Edmonton), still a considerable distance from the Yukon or the Pacific. Traces of the old grade are still visible north of Victoria Golf Course, as we observed on our ramble to the Legislature Grounds.

Larch trees are deciduous conifers, which means that unlike most trees with cones, they lose their leaves in autumn and grow new leaves in spring.

Larch Trees

Larch
New Leaves

New Leaves