Fitting the Bodice Sloper via the Measurement Chart.

The bodice sloper is drafted from the current measurement chart each time the Dress Shop program is run. The purpose of the sloper is to proof the body measurements on the chart which then provides the starting point for every styled pattern that is subsequently drafted. It follows that if your measurements are incorrect the sloper will not fit well and neither will any of the styled patterns. Because the sloper is such a close fitting garment with no ease, it immediately highlights incorrect measurements. By changing these measurements on the chart, you will perfect the fit of the sloper and be ready to draft styled patterns.

On this page are the most common complex fitting issues for the bodice sloper. Not every possibility and combination is covered but these examples should give you an idea of how to fix your particular problem. In each case, only one problem variation and solution is offered e.g.: too short; for the opposite problem (too long) just reverse the solution suggestion. Often what appears to be a problem in one area is caused by something else. These tips are offered by the Cross Check! comments.

For simpler fit issues involving a single measurement or for a detailed explanation of each measurement, see the Bodice Measurements page.


Quick Links
Shoulders : Sloped : Squared : Wide/Narrow : Shoulder seam position :
Neck : Gaping : High/Low : Wide :
Bust : High Bust : Full Bust :
Side Seam : Position/Angled : Length :
Armhole : Tight/Gaping : Armhole Depth : Armhole Balancing
Sleeve : Bicep : Armhole and Sleeve cap Discussion


Getting Started

If this is your first sloper attempt see my Sloper Step-by-Step Checklist page for guidelines.

In my opinion there are three core measurements (illustrated alongside) for each of the front and back bodices which create a basic framework for the draft. Until these measurements are correct, all other changes will be difficult to get right as many other measurements hinge off these points.

For the front bodice, they are the Full Length Front (FLF), the Across Shoulder Front (ASF) and the Front Shoulder Slope (FSS). The back bodice uses the corresponding back measurements, FLB, ASB, BSS.

The Full Length defines the total bodice length. The Across Shoulder and Shoulder Slope measurements together define the shoulder point and set the shoulder seam angle. The shoulder point in particular is an important landmark because so many front bodice measurements are linked off from there.

3 measurements
Click for larger image

Check the sloper on the body. The shoulder seam should lie on the top of the shoulder and swing neither forward nor backward at either end. From the front view the shoulder point should be high on the shoulder at the top of the arm and in line with the front armhole crease. The neck point should lie at the base of the neck at the side where a necklace would touch. The waistline at center back and center front should reach the natural waist of the body. Check the sections below to correct any fitting issues.


Shoulder

(Back to Quick Links)

Problem: Shoulder seam is sloped and standing up at the side neck.
The shoulder seam is not lying against the body. Shoulder seams appear too sloped.
There are horizontal wrinkles at the neck edge near the shoulder seam.
There may be some strain at the shoulder point.
The center front or center back waist may/may not reach the natural waistline.
The neckline at center front and center back may/may not be too high.

slope shoulders
Click for larger image

Side (a) in drawing.
  • The center front waist and center back waist meets the natural waistline.
  • There is no diagonal strain at the shoulder.

This indicates the Full Length Front and/or Full Length Back is too long.
The Shoulder Slopes are correct.

Fix: Pin out the excess at the neck on either side of the shoulder seam from the neckline towards the shoulder point ensuring the neck point lies on the shoulder line. Measure the pinned amounts from front and back separately.

Assess if the Center Length Front and Back need adjustment to lower the neck.

Shorten the Full Length Front by (x) amount as measured.

Shorten the Full Length Back by (y) amount as measured.

If necessary, shorten the Center Length Front and Center Length Back.

Outcome: The slope of the shoulder seam matches the angle of the shoulder. The neck point is in the correct position when viewed from the side. (If the shoulder point is wrong see separate notes for that.)

Side (b) in drawing.
  • The center front waist and/or center back waist does not meet the natural waistline unless the bodice is tugged down.
  • The Full Length Front and Back is correct if the bodice is tugged down.
  • There appears to be strain at the shoulder points.

The Shoulder Slopes are too short which is holding the bodice up on the shoulders. The Full Length Front and/or Full Length Back are probably correct and would fit if the shoulders were released.

Fix: Step 1: Assess the position of the bust point and the armhole depth. If they appear correct do not change these measurements. If these points are wrong, re-assess them in step 3.

Step 2: If the sleeve is stitched in, unpick the upper portion of the sleeve cap. Release the shoulder seam gradually from the shoulder point in towards the neck until the neck point rests correctly on the shoulder. The bodice should drop down to meet the waist. Pin in a scrap of fabric under the opened shoulder seam to support it. Mark a new shoulder line from the neck point to the new shoulder point.

Measure from the previous shoulder point to the new shoulder point on the Front (x) and the Back (y) bodice.

Assess the Full Length Front and Full Length Back. Assess the Center Length Front and Center Length Back. Measure any additional adjustments needed.

Step 3: If the bust point and armhole depth were wrong in step 1, re-measure them from the new shoulder point. The correction will probably be similar the (x) amount.
If they were correct in step 1 they will now temporarily appear to be low, due to the opened shoulder. Do not adjust them.

Lengthen the Front Shoulder Slope by (x) amount.

Lengthen the Back Shoulder Slope by (y) amount.

If required in Step 2:
Modify Full Length Front and Full Length Back.
Modify Center Length Front and Center Length Back.

If required in Step 3:
Modify Bust Depth as required. Modify Armhole Depth as required.

Outcome: The slope of the shoulder seam matches the angle of the shoulder. The bodice drops so the center front and center back waist meets the natural waistline. The shoulder seam is in the correct position.

(Back to Quick Links)

Problem: Shoulder seam is too squared.
Excess fabric can be pinched out at the shoulder point.
There are diagonal strain lines from underarm to neckpoint.
The underarm appears too tight or too high.
The center front or center back waist may/may not reach the natural waistline.

  Test: If the person lifts their shoulders the wrinkles lessen.

This is the opposite to the previous problem (Sloped shoulders).

square shoulders
Click for larger image

  • The center front and center back waist reaches the natural waistline.
  • There is excess fabric at the shoulder seam.
  • The armhole may be too high or tight.
  • The bust point may be too high.

This indicates the Shoulder Slope Front and Back are too long.
The Full Length Front and Full Length Back are correct.

Fix: Step 1: Assess the position of the bust point and the armhole depth. If they appear correct and there is no underarm strain, go to Step 3. If these points are wrong, go to step 2.

Step 2: Release the side seam a short distance at the underarm so the armhole will not restrict the correction. You may also need a small slash diagonally into the lower armhole.

Step 3: Pin out the excess at the shoulder point either side of the shoulder seam until the wrinkles are removed. This may temporarily lift the armhole higher while the shoulder is being pinned. Ensure that the shoulder seam is not pulled forward or backward and correctly meets the shoulder point. Measure the pinned amount on front (x) and back (y) bodice.

Step 4: Re-assess the bust point and armhole depth. Re-measure them from the new shoulder point

  • Subtract (x) amount from Front Shoulder Slope .
  • Subtract (y) amount from Back Shoulder Slope.
  • If required in Step 4:
    • Modify Bust Depth.
    • Modify Armhole Depth.

Outcome: The shoulder seam lies against the shoulder evenly. There are no strain lines to the armhole, neck or shoulder. The armhole depth and bust point is correct.

  • The center front and/or center back waist does not reach the natural waistline.
  • There is excess fabric at the shoulder seam.
  • The armhole may be too high or tight.
  • The bust point may be too high.

The Full Length Front and Back are too short and need to be lengthened. The Shoulder Slopes may be correct.

Fix: Release the shoulder seam gradually from the neck point out towards the shoulder point until the bodice drops and the wrinkles are removed. Pin in a scrap of fabric under the opened shoulder seam to support it. Mark a new shoulder line from the new neck point to the shoulder point.

Measure from the previous neck point to the new neck point on the Front (x) and the Back (y) bodice.

If the Bodice waist still does not reach the natural waistline, equally increase the Full Length Front and Shoulder Slope Front. Also equally increase the Full Length Back and Shoulder Slope Back.

  • Add (x) amount to Full Length Front.
  • Add (y) amount to Full Length Back.

    If bodice still does not reach waist:

    • Add further amounts equally to Full Length Front and Shoulder Slope Front.
    • Add further amounts equally to Full Length Front and Shoulder Slope Front.
       
  • (Back to Quick Links)
    Problem: Shoulders are too wide.
    Armhole seam is hanging off the shoulder. 
    The shoulder seam is in the correct position.

    across shoulder
    Click for larger image

    Side (a) in drawing.

    • Neck point is in correct position on the shoulder line.
    • Shoulder point is too far down the arm.
    • Shoulder seam is too long.

    Fix: Mark the new shoulder point. It should be high on the shoulder and in line with the front armhole crease. Measure (x) from the new shoulder point to the armhole seam.

    Re-measure Shoulder Slope Front and Shoulder Slope Back to new shoulder point.

    Re-measure Bust Depth and Armhole Depth from new shoulder point.

    • Subtract twice (x) amount from Across Shoulder Front
    • Subtract twice (x) amount from Across Shoulder Back.
    • Subtract (x) amount from Shoulder Length.
    • Modify Front Shoulder Slope and Back Shoulder Slope measurements.
    • Modify Bust Depth and Armhole Depth measurements.

    Side (b) in drawing.
    • Shoulder seam is in correct position on the shoulder line but should be closer to the neck (at the red dot)
    • Shoulder point is too far down the arm.
    • Shoulder seam is correct length if it is moved closer to the neck.

    Fix: Mark the new shoulder point. It should be high on the shoulder and in line with the front armhole crease. Measure (x) from the new shoulder point to the armhole seam.

    Re-measure Shoulder Slope Front and Shoulder Slope Back to new shoulder point.

    Re-measure Bust Depth and Armhole Depth from new shoulder point.

    • Subtract twice (x) amount from Across Shoulder Front.
    • Subtract twice (x) amount from Across Shoulder Back.
    • Modify Front Shoulder Slope and Back Shoulder Slope measurements.
    • Modify Bust Depth and Armhole Depth measurements.

    Shoulder Length remains the same.

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Problem: The shoulder seam is not correctly positioned on the shoulder.
    The shoulder seam is angled with the neck and/or shoulder points too far forwards/backwards.
    The shoulders may be too wide with the shoulder point hanging down the arm.

    shoulder point
    Click for larger image

    Side (a) in drawing.
    • Neck point is too far forward.
    • Neckline at side neck is correct.
    • Shoulder point is too far forward.

    Mark the new neck point and new shoulder point on sloper. Draw a new shoulder seam from new neck point to shoulder point.

    Measure distance (x) from old to new neck point.

    Measure the distance (y) from old to new shoulder point.

    Re-measure the Armhole Depth from new shoulder point.



    • Add (x) amount to Full Length Front.
      Subtract same (x amount from Full Length Back.
    • Add (y) amount to Front Shoulder Slope.
      Subtract same (y) amount from Back Shoulder Slope .
    • Add (y) amount to Bust Depth.
    • Add (y) amount to Armhole Depth or use new measurement.

    Outcome: Shoulder seam lies correctly on shoulder without angling forward or backward.

    Side (b) in drawing.
    • Neck point is in correct position on the shoulder line but should be closer to the neck (at the red dot)
    • Shoulder point is too far forward and too far down the arm.
    • Shoulder seam is correct length if it is moved closer to the neck.

    Mark new shoulder point on sloper. Draw new shoulder seam from neck point to new shoulder point.

    Re-measure Shoulder Slope Front and Shoulder Slope Back to new shoulder point.

    Re-measure Bust Depth and Armhole Depth from new shoulder point.

    Measure from new shoulder point to armhole edge (z)

    • Use new Front Shoulder Slope and Back Shoulder Slope measurements.
    • Use new Bust Depth and new Armhole Depth measurements.
    • Subtract twice (z) amount from Across Shoulder Front
    • Subtract twice (z) amount from Across Shoulder Back.

    Outcome: Shoulder seam lies correctly on shoulder without angling forward or backward.

    Shoulder length is correct at neck and shoulder edges.


    Neck

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Problems: Neckline is not fitting. Shoulder seam is in position.

    Neck is too wide/close at the sides.
    Neck is too high/low at center back or front.
    Neckline is gaping or standing away at back or front (illustrated). Too much fabric at center front or back neck.

    Note: The sloper front neckline must be in a jewel neck position at the base of the throat even if you will never wear such a neckline. It serves as a landmark point for necklines and the base line for shirt collars.

    front neck
    Click for larger image

    Illustrated problem - front neck gaping

    • Front neckline is too big and is gaping.
    • Back neck width is correct.
    • The neck and shoulder points are in the correct position.

    This indicates that the Across Shoulder Back is correct and the Across Shoulder Front is too wide by comparison.

    Fix: Pin out the excess in a dart from CF neck down. Measure the amount of the dart (x).

    Note: It is usual that the Across Shoulder Front measurement is smaller than the Across Shoulder Back.

    • Subtract (x) amount from Across Shoulder Front.

    Similar problem to above but the shoulder width is narrow.

    • Front neckline is gaping, standing away from the body and appears too wide.
    • Neck width appears too small.
    • Shoulder width appears too narrow.

    This indicates that the Across Shoulder Front is too wide in comparison to the Across Shoulder Back. The Across Shoulder Front is probably correct, but in this case the Across Shoulder Back is too small causing the shoulders to be narrow.

    Fix: Unpick the shoulder seams and re-pin with the seams evenly displaced so the front neck and shoulders lie smoothly. Confirm that the front shoulder and neck points are in the correct position. Measure the difference between the front and back at the shoulder ends and add this to the Across Shoulder Back. The back neck width will automatically be corrected.

    • Add to the Across Shoulder Back by the required amount.

    (Back to Quick Links)

    • Front neckline is too high / choking
    • Front bodice waistline meets natural waist.*

    Cross check! Are the shoulder seams in the correct place? Incorrect shoulder placement can cause the garment to pull backwards creating a choking feeling at the neckline.

    Fix: Measure the extra length (x) at center front neck.

    For a neck that is too low, add to the Center Length Front or Center Length Back.

    *If the bodice does not meet the natural waist, first adjust the Full Length Front or Back, then re-assess the neck. It may be that the Full Length Back is too short pulling the garment backwards.

    • Subtract (x) amount from the Center Length Front.
    (Back to Quick Links)
    • Neck is too wide at the sides/ Shoulder seam is too short.
    • The shoulder points are in the correct position.

    Fix: Measure correct shoulder length.

    • Add required amount to Shoulder Length


    Bust

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Problem: High Bust is too big. Front armhole is gaping.

    Too large at the upper bust.
    Can fold away a dart in the armhole.
    Front bust fits well.

    Caution: Do not attempt to over fit the armhole until the sleeve is stitched in.

    high bust
    Click for larger image

    This appears to be an armhole problem but is a problem with the High Bust. The difference between the High Bust and Bust Front determines the size of the bust darts. The "armhole dart" here indicates that that present darting is not enough so we need to reduce the High Bust to create a greater difference.

    Fix: Pin out the excess in a vertical fold directly above the bust of each side. Measure the excess.

    If the High Bust is too tight, make vertical slashes above each bust. Pin in a scrap of fabric under the slash to support it. Measure the amount the slash opens.

    • Subtract (x) amount from the High Bust

    (The Armhole Depth is not affected by this change)

    (Back to Quick Links)
    Problem: Bust is tight - sloper won't close in front.

    Cross check! If the back armhole is not balanced or needs to be longer, it may give the impression that the bust is tight . The armhole will seem tight and you will see strain and pulling from the back armhole up to the center upper back area.

    • Is the actual bust tight or is the back armhole pulling?
      If the armhole is okay, re-check the bust measurements and compare to the sloper pattern.
    • Check that the Across Chest is correct.

    bust
    Click for larger image

    Determine if the problem is with the back bust or front bust.

    • Is the back bust too tight?
    • Was the back bust measured across the back right up under the arms (not at bra band level) ?
    • Is the side seam in the correct position?

    Fix: Unpick the side seams in the region of the underarm and side bust dart and allow the seam to open. Pin a scrap of fabric under the seam to support it. Redraw the side seam. Measure adjustments as required.

    Measure (x) from the old to the new side seam on the front at the underarm level. (if required)

    Measure (y) from the old to the new side seam on the back at the underarm level. (if required)

    Measure (z) from the old to the new side seam on the front at the side dart level. (if required)

    Adjust measurements as required:

    • Add twice (x) amount to the High Bust
    • Add twice (y) amount to the Bust Back
    • Add twice (z) amount to the Bust Front


    Side Seam

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Problem: Side seam is angled or wrongly positioned.

    The side seam is angled with either/both the underarm or waist end too far forwards/backwards.
    Side seam is not equally splitting the body frame.

    The side seam must be vertical and equally split the skeletal frame between front and back.

    side seam
    Click for larger image

    • The side seam at underarm is tilted backwards
    • The side seam at waist side is tilted forwards

      Fix: Redraw the side seam in the correct position.

    Measure (x) from the old to the new underarm point.

    Measure (y) from the old to the new waist side point.

    At the side bust dart position measure (z) between the old and the new side seam.

    To reposition the underarm point:

    • Add twice (x) amount to the Bust Back
    • Subtract twice (x) amount from the High Bust

    To reposition the waist side point:

    • Subtract twice (y) amount from the Waist Back
    • Add twice (y) amount to the Waist Front

    Balance the side seam at Bust Front:

    • If the new side seam crosses the side bust dart: Subtract twice (z) amount from the Bust Front
    • If the new side seam does not cross the side bust dart: Add twice (z) amount to the Bust Front

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Problem: Side seam is too short/long.

    • The side seam does not reach the natural waist.
    • It fits correctly at the underarm.

    Fix: Measure (x) from the sloper waist to the natural waist.

    Note: Altering the Side Length will have an effect on the back armhole depth. (see Armhole Balancing)
    If increasing or reducing the side length adversely affects the armhole balance, re-assess the Full Length Back measurement.

    • Add (x) amount to the Side Length
    • The side seam is too low at the underarm.
    • It reaches the natural waist

    This is an Armhole Depth problem. See the fix described there.


    Armhole

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Note: The sloper drafts with a very high armhole. A small amount of ease added to the Armhole Depth measurement. This is so the sloper can establish a baseline  and sleeveless garments will draft modestly at the underarm. Other styled garments draft with more armhole ease and lower armholes.

    The edge of the 1.5 cm (5/8") seam allowance on the sloper should just graze the back underarm. Trim the seam allowance when fitting the sloper.

    Fitting Problems:
    • The front / back armhole is gaping near the shoulder. I can pinch a dart parallel to the shoulder seam.
    This is corrected with the fix described under Front/Back Shoulder Slope .
    • The lower front armhole is gaping. I can pinch a dart from around the armhole notch to the bust.

    See the fix under High Bust.

    • The back armhole is gaping in the middle of the armhole near the Across Back position.

    There will be some gaping (approx. 1-2 cm) until the sleeve is sewn in. Re-assess it then.

    This is a problem for people with some degree of back roundness. Try reducing the Shoulder Slope Back. For significant back roundness, increase the width of the back shoulder dart.

    • The armhole is loose and gaping at the underarm.
    • The armhole is also too low.

    Fix: The Armhole Depth is too big. The Bust Back, Bust Front and/or the High Bust are too big.

    First fix the armhole depth so the back bust measurements are in the right place.

    Subtract from Bust Back, Bust Front, High Bust as required. Reverse the suggestions in the Full Bust topic

     

    • The front armhole is tight and has diagonal wrinkles across the upper chest to the neck.

    1. This may indicate that the bodice shoulders are too squared.

    2. If this is not the case, increase the Armhole Depth. See below.

    • The back armhole is tight and is pulling from the underarm to the center of the upper back.

    1. This may indicate that the bodice shoulders are too squared .

    2. Have you balanced the front / back armhole depths?

    The back armhole depth should be 2.5 cm to 4 cm (1" to 1.5") larger than the front armhole depth. See more details under Armhole Balancing.

    3. If this is not the case, increase the Armhole Depth. See below.

    • The armhole is definitely too low under my arm.
    • None of the above problems apply.

    See Armhole Depth for this correction.

     

    • The armhole is definitely too tight and high under my arm.
    • None of the above problems apply.

    See Armhole Depth for this correction.

     

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Armhole Depth.

    The Armhole Depth measurement sets the front armhole depth. The Side Length controls the back armhole depth. Increase the Armhole Depth and reduce the Side Length by the same amount.  This will keep the front waist in the same position and keep the same armhole balance between front and back armhole depth.

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Armhole Balancing.

    The front armhole depth is drafted from the Armhole Depth plus ease. The back armhole is not directly measured but is the remainder of the length from the shoulder to the waist, less the side seam length.  The back depth should be 2.5 cm to 4 cm (1" to 1.5") larger than the front armhole depth as measured vertically.

    The Sleeve menu displays all the armhole measurements of the sleeve and bodice, and the armhole depth differences can be seen there.

    The side seam measurement is altered to achieve the required difference between armhole depths. If the front armhole depth is shortened, the back armhole depth remains the same, causing a greater difference between the front and back depths. As the Armhole Depth measurement changes, the front side seam moves relatively, causing a change at the front waist level.

    To keep the previous armhole balance and side waistline position, the amount subtracted from the armhole depth is added to the side seam length.

    The armhole depth can be affected by changes to the Shoulder Slope and Across Shoulder that move the shoulder point at the top of the arm.

     


    Bicep

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Problem: Bicep tight.

    The upper sleeve is too tight.
    There are horizontal stress lines around the arm. 

    Cross check! If the bicep tightness reduces when the arm is slightly raised, see Cap Height problem below.

    Is the armhole balanced and does the armhole fit correctly without the sleeve? An incorrect armhole may make the sleeve too small.

    bicep
    Click for larger image

    • The upper sleeve is too tight. 

      Fix: Remeasure the bicep or slash the sleeve vertically and measure the opening .

    Add (x) amount to the Bicep

    (Back to Quick Links)

    Problem: Sleeve cap pulls vertically.  Cap height too short

    The sleeve cap is too tight, it pulls when the arm is alongside the body.
    Person cannot move the arm with the sloper on.

    Cross check! Remember that this is a sloper and is intended to be close fitting with zero to very little ease. The sleeve and armhole has very little ease and you can only move your arm about 30 degrees in any direction.

    bicep
    Click for larger image

    • There are strain lines from the top of the sleeve to the front and back armhole when the arm is alongside the body. 
    • The bicep appears too tight.
    • When the arm is slightly raised to the side, the strain lines reduce and the bicep fits comfortably.

      Fix: The cap height needs to be increased yet the armhole length and bicep determine the sleeve cap height.

    Assess if the strain is excessive or slight. If it is slight, extra bicep or cap ease on styled patterns will remove the problem. Try a fitted shell pattern.

    Persons with large upper arms and relatively small armhole depth are likely to find this problem. You may need to slightly increase your armhole depth and/or bicep measurements. It is a balancing act for this figure prolem.

    See the Sleeve Cap Disscussion below.

    On styled patterns add extra cap ease.


    (Back to Quick Links)
    Armhole and Sleeve Cap discussion

    The bodice armhole is drafted using a combination of measurements of which the Armhole Depth is the most important. The back armhole is not directly measured but is the remainder of the length from the shoulder to the waist, less the side seam length.

    The sleeve is divided into two portions separated by an imaginary line between the two underarm points. The area above this line with the curved hill shape at the top, is known as the sleeve cap and is sewn into the bodice armhole. The area below the underarm line is the arm portion and is sewn into a cylinder shape to fit the arm itself.

    The Sleeve menu option displays all the measurements relating to the sleeve and armhole for the drafted pattern.

    bicep
    Click for larger image


    Armhole Length The curved line length of the front (turquoise line) and back (purple line) bodice armhole.
    Sleeve Armhole Length The curved line length of the front and back sleeve cap including ease. This will be larger than the corresponding armhole length.

    Armhole Depth . Vertical depth of the front and back bodice armholes. The back depth should be 1" to 1.5" larger than the front. (Known as armhole balancing)

    Sleeve Cap (Green shaded portion) The sleeve cap drafts in a curved shape using the armhole lengths from the bodice plus ease. The cap ease is sewn between the front and back armhole notches.

    Cap Height (Orange vertical line) The vertical height of the sleeve cap from underarm level to the top of the sleeve. On a closely fitted sleeve, the Cap height on the sleeve is equivalent to the armhole depth on the bodice. On a casual or drop shoulder sleeve, the cap height is shallower.

    Cap Width (Brown horizontal line) The cap width is the horizontal width of the sleeve cap between the underarm points. Generally, it will be larger than the bicep measurement to allow for ease and movement.

    Bicep= the upper arm portion of the sleeve closest to the underarm. Normally the fullest width of the arm. Generally bicep + ease = cap width.

    Cap Ease & Bicep Ease These two factors work with each other to shape the sleeve cap.

    If the bicep ease is increased, the cap height is reduced because the armhole length (see below) must remain the same. A reduced sleeve cap can cause problems with vertical strain lines on the sleeve.

    In order to keep the same cap height but increase the bicep ease, the cap ease must increase resulting in a longer curved length to fit into the armhole. As a result there is extra gathering or ease on the cap. This extra cap ease is not always desirable and this is can result in a dilema of which measurement to change.

    This can only be resolved by some trail and error to find a comfortable compromise between comfort, fit, appearance and fabric.



    Copyright by Tessa Elston, 2004, 2005.
    All content, descriptions, drawings and presentation style are copyrighted by Tessa Elston and may not be reproduced or imitated.

    Created September, 2004
    Last updated 16th November, 2004