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CLICK HERE FOR INFLUENCE OF THE ANDALUSIAN HORSE ON NORTH & SOUTH AMERICAN BREEDS
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ANDALUSIAN BREED STANDARDS

Head:

« The head should be of “average” size, and proportionate to the body. It should be rectangular, lean, with a straight or slightly convex profile. The ears should be mobile, medium sized, well placed and parallel with a well rounded outside curve. They should not point inwards.

« The forehead should be wide, flat or slightly convex, with large, expressive triangular eyes.

« The muzzle should be soft and smooth. The upper lip should be longer than the lower lip, and divided (hare’s lip).

« The nostrils should be long, in the shape of an inverted comma or almond.

« The jaw should be neither pronounced nor very muscular and blend into the rest of the head.

Neck:

« The neck should be of average length and size. It should have and slightly arched curve on top and slightly concave curve on the bottom.

« The shoulder should be long, elastic and sloping at a 45 degree angle from the line of the ground. It should have sufficient movement to allow freedom of the front legs.

Chest:

« It should be proportionate, low set and muscular.

Body:

« The body should be well proportionate and robust.

« The withers should be unobtrusively wide and obvious.

« A solid muscular back, wide, short loin, muscular and somewhat rounded and well joined to the back and the croup.

Back:

« The back is located between the kidneys and the withers and here is where the impulsion created by the hindquarters is transmitted to the forehand. It should be flexible, fairly short, and sufficiently wide in proportion to the rest of the animal, and very slightly concave.

Loin:

« The loin is formed by the six lumbar vertebrae, and the muscular mass that covers them, between the back and the croup. The lumbar region of the PRE is short, wide, and very sensitive to the touch.

Croup:

« The croup should be of average length and width, rounded, strong, and slightly sloping. The tail set is low and placed between the buttocks

Size:

« The Andalusian usually stands between 15.0 and 16.2 hands and has great presence.
 

Colour:

« Although early history of the breed says that all colours were found, today approximately 80% of Andalusians are grey, 15% are bay and 5% are black or chestnut. 

Movement:

« The movement should be agile, high, with good extension, harmonic and rhythmic. They possess a predisposition for collection.

And then there is, of course, the mane and tail…long, thick, and abundant….a trademark of the breed! 

CLICK HERE FOR SIMILARITIES & DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE ANDALUSIAN & THE LUSITANO HORSESTER

CLICK HERE FOR THE POWERPOINT PRESENTATION “THE ANDALUSIAN HORSE”

USES OF THE ANDALUSIAN HORSE

To complement all these conformational characteristics, the most outstanding thing about the breed is its versatility. It is due to the union of mental balance, harmony, intelligence and willingness to work.  The Andalusian has natural collection, impulsion, and agility which makes them the perfect all-around athlete. In the past, the Iberian horse was considered the perfect war horse and appeared throughout history in great battles accompanied by renowned historical figures such as Xenophon.  

Andalusians are used in the bullring in Spain and Portugal as well as for general cattle work and pleasure riding. They have a lot of cow sense, because they have been used to work cattle in their native Spain for centuries. The ability to “turn on a dime” makes them perfect mounts for the bullring.

They excel in dressage because for their conformation and trainability. They have been competing at the Olympic level since 1988 and placed in the top every time against other breeds. They have also placed in international jumping competitions at the Grand Prix level.

In Spain, even young children ride stallions, in Ferias and parades, around hundreds of other horses. This is possible because of their great obedience and fearlessness, which also makes them great trail horses. They are perfect carriage horses and have placed in international driving competitions against other breeds.

In North America, the Andalusian is ridden both English and Western and is seen competing in dressage, driving, cutting, cattle work, working equitation, and jumping. Their exceptional presence and beauty make them an asset to any show ring, exhibition, or parade.

Because this breed has been around humans for about three thousand years, they have developed a special bond with us, can understand and can communicate with us. They can read our moods and they seek our companionship and praise and bond to “their” person.

BREEDS THAT CARRY  ANDALUSIAN BLOOD

The Andalusian has influenced many, many breeds around the world...:

• The
Hanoverian from Andalusians, Holsteiners, Thoroughbreds and Cleveland Bays.
• The
Holsteiner from Spanish, Barb and Neapolitan blood.  
• The
Lipizzan from 24 Andalusian mares brought by Archduke Charles II of Austria in 1580.
• The
Mustang descends from Andalusians and Barbs brought to North America by the first Spanish settlers.
• The
Paso Fino descends from Andalusians, Spanish Jennets, and Barbs that Columbus brought to Santo Domingo on his second voyage.
• The
Peruvian descends from Andalusians, Barbs and Spanish Jennets brought to South America by the Spanish Conquistadores.
• The
Quarter Horse from Mustangs(which were descendants of Andalusians).
• The
Alter-Real directly descend from Andalusians.
• The
Criollo descended from Andalusians and Barbs in the 16th century.
• The first
Kladruber came from Emperor Maximillian II, who imported Andalusians during the 1570's.

Here is a great article about the Andalusian’s contribution to the modern Sport Horse Breeds

…and have even created some more modern ones:

MORE RECENT BREEDS CREATED FROM IBERIAN HORSES:

Iberian Warmblood (Andalusian x Thoroughbred)
Azteca (Andalusian x Quarter Horse or APHA)
Spanish Norman (Andalusian x Percheron)
Hispano-Árabe (PRE x Arabian)
Warlander (Andalusian x Friesian)

SCIENTIFIC PAPERS

Gestational Length in the Carthusian Broodmare. Satue, Filipe, Mota, Munoz.

Genetic Analyses for Linear Conformation Traits in Pura Raza Espanola Horses. Sanchez, Gomez, Molina, Valera.

The Lusitano Horse Maternal Lineage Based on Mitochondrial D-Loop Sequence.  Lopes, Mendonca, Cymbron, Valera, Costa-Ferreira, Camara Machado.

Pedigree Analysis in the Andalusian Horse. Valera, Molina, Gutierrez, Gomez, Goyache.

The Origins of Iberian Horses  Assessed via Mitochondrial DNA. Royo, Alvarez, Beja-Pereira, Molina, Fernandez, Jordana, Gomez, Gutierrez, Goyache.

Sire x Stud Intercation for Body Measurement Traits in Spanish Purebred Horses. Gomez, Goyache, Molina, Valera.

Genetic Parameters of Morphofunctional Traits in Andalusian Horse.  Molina, Valera, Dos Santos, Rodero.

Preliminary Analysis of the Morphofunctional Evaluation in Horse-Show of the Spanish Purebred Horse. Valera, Gessa, Gomez, Horcada, Medina, Cervantes, Goyache, Molina.

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