International Thomas More Bibliography (G):
Contemporaries of Thomas More, Part II: Early English Renaissance to 1560


 

Note: The Contemporaries of Thomas More Bibliography is a very extensively revised and augmented version of an unpublished bibliography of the Early English Renaissance and Reformation that I compiled while I was working on my Ph. D. Dissertation. Any comments, corrections, suggested additions or queries can be sent to the compiler and editor at lakowskir@gmail.com

Version 1.4a (); © Romuald I. Lakowski ,


Table of Contents

International Thomas More Bibliography

Abbreviations
Opera Omnia, Correspondence and Humanistic Works
Polemical and Devotional Works and Trial
Background Studies
Family and Friends, and Biographies
Thomas More and the Creative Arts
Utopia Part A: Editions and Translations
Utopia Part B: Studies
Calendars of the Letters and Papers of Thomas More, John Fisher, and John Colet (Under Development)

Contemporaries of Thomas More

Part I: Fisher, Colet and the Carthusians
Part II: Early English English Renaissance (A—H)
Part III: Early English English Renaissance (J—W)


Contemporaries of Thomas More Bibliography, Part II: Early English Renaissance (A—H)

I plan to add at least two more files to the Contemporaries of Thomas More in the future: one of the English Reformation (to 1540) and another on the Continental (Northern) Renaissance and Reformation (to 1540). The entries in this section are modelled at least partially on The Contemporaries of Erasmus (Toronto: 1985–87) and will hopefully eventually also include short biographies.


Henry Abyngdon (Abingdon) (d. by Sept. 1497)
John Alcock (1430–1500)
Andrea Ammonio (d.1517)
Bernard André ()
Cardinal Christopher Bainbridge, Archbishop of York (1462/64–1514)
Stephen Baron (fl. 1508–1513)
John Batmanson (Bathmanson, Batemanson) - (d 16 November 1531)
Lady Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby (1443–1509)
Lord Berners, John Bourchier (c.1467/69–1533)
Add William Blount, Lord Mountjoy and his son Charles?
Antonio Bonvisi (Buonvisi) (d.1558)
Thomas Bourchier, Cardinal and Archbishop of Canterbury (c.1411–1486)
Add Henry Stafford, Second Duke of Buckingham (4 September 1454 – 2 November 1483)
Edward Stafford, Third Duke of Buckingham (3 February 1478–17 May 1521)
Pietro Carmeliano ()
William Catesby (d.1485)
Catherine (Katherine) of Aragon, Queen Consort (16 December 1485–7 January 1536)
George Cavendish (1494–c.1562)
Richard Charnock (Charnok) (d c April 1505)
John Claymond (1457?‐d 19 November 1537)
John Clement (d. 1 July 1572)
Margaret Giggs Clement (d. 6 July 1570)
Leonard Cox (Coxe) (c1495–1549+)
Richard Croke (c 1489–late August 1558)
Croyland (Crowland) Chronicle, Second Continuation (1486)
Roger Edgeworth (d. 1560)
Edward IV (28 April 1442–9 April 1483)
Elizabeth of York, Queen (d.11 February 1503)
Sir Thomas Elyot (1490?–1546)
Erasmus and England
Robert Fabyan and Town and City Chronicles
John Fowler (1537–13 February 1579)
Richard Foxe (Fox) (1448?–5 Oct. 1528)
Stephen Gardiner (c1497–12 November 1555)
George, Duke of Clarence (21 October 1449–18 February 1478)
Add Paolo Giovio's (Jovius) Descriptio Britanniae.
William Gonell (Gonnell, Gunnell) (d. 1560)
Richard Grafton (1506/7–1573)
William Grocyn (1446?–1519)
Add George and Henry Guildford
John Hackett (Hacket) (d. 27 Oct. 1534)
Edward Hall (1497–1547
John Harris (c1510–11 November 1579)
Lord Hastings (c.1430–1483)
Henry VII
Henry VIII (Excluding the English Reformation)
Add Giles Heron and Family
Gentian Hervet (Hervetus) and England (1499–1584)
John Heywood (1497–1578?)
Ellis Heywood (Heliseo Heivodo) (1530–1578)
Add Jasper Heywood at least his plays
John Holt (Holte) (d.1504)
William Horman (1457–1535)
Richard Hyrde (d.25 March 1528)


Contemporaries of Thomas More, Part II: Early English Renaissance (A—H)

  1.  

Biographies and Bibliographies

Henry Abyngdon (Abingdon) ()

Not in ODNB.

  1. Thomas More's Latin Epigrams on Henry Abyngdon, CW 3/2: #159–61, pp.200–202; notes on pp.380–81, cf. p.707; with Brixius' criticism in is Antimorus pp.508/500–510/515. See also CWE #1087/95–101, p.240, and n.11 on p.408; and #1093/42–45 (Rogers #87 and 90).
  2. Flood, W. H. Grattan. Henry Abyngdon, Mus. Bac., Choirmaster of the King's Chapel in 1455. Musical Times 1 June 1911: 377–78.
  3. Holahan, Susan L. More's Epigrams on Henry Abyngdon. [1968] See Thomas More: Latin Epigrams.
  4. Gunderson, Catherine F. Henry Abingdon Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 1: 1.

John Alcock (1430–1500)

Add references to STC.

  1. Alcock, John. An exhortacyon made to Relygyous systers. Westmynstre: Wynkyn de Worde, n.d. Rpt. (The English Experience 638) Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1974.
  2. Alcock, John. Mons perfectionis. Westmestre: Wynkyn de Worde, 1497. Facsimile Rpt. The English Experience 706. Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1974.
  3. Nugent, E. M., ed. Mons Perfectionis: Otherwise in English, The Hill of Perfection. By John Alcock. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 326–33.

Add ODNB (and blench?)

Andrea Ammonio (Andreas Ammonius) ()

Editions

  1. Ammonio, Andrea. Ad Gulielmum Monioium, Angiie [sic] baronem, carmen asclepiadeum. Aegloga . . . Elegia de obitu Henrici vij . . . Epithalamium in nuptiis regis octaui et regine Catherine. Gent: , . [USTC 403653; Shaaber A307.]
  2. Ammonio, Andrea. Lycas et Ammon. In En habes lector bucolicorum autores XXXVIII. Quotquot videlicet a Vergilii aetate ad nostra usque tempora, eo poëmatis genere usos, farrago quidem eclogarum clvi. mira com elegantia tum varietate referta, nuncque primum in studiosorum juvenum gratiam atque usum collecta. Ed. Gilbert Cousin. Basileae: (ex officina Ioannis Oporini, . [Shaaber A308; USTC 649941.]
  3. Ammonio, Andrea. Andreae Ammonii Carmina Omnia: accedunt, Tres epistolae nondum editae. Nuova collezione di testi umanistici inediti o rari, 13. Edited by Clemente Pizzi. Florentiae [Firenze]: : in aedibus Leonis S. Olschki(IS) [Olschki], . [Worldcat OCLC 797265183, etc.]
  4. Ammonio, Andrea. Carmina (1511). A hypertext critical edition by Dana F. Sutton. The Philogical Museum, 2010. http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/ammonio/ [Introduction, Text, and translation.]

USTC attributes three 1543 editions of Commentaria in quinque Voces Porphyryii cum Graeco exemplari recens collata to Andrea Ammonio. This seems to be a mistake for Alexandrinus Hermias Ammonius who also translated Porphyry's Commentaries into Latin.

Studies

  1. Lédos, Eugeène Gabriel. Les poésies latines d'Andrea Ammonio della Rena. Revue des bibliothèques 7 (): [161]–176. [Worldcat OCLC 29104949, 457702635.]
  2. Ammonio, Andrea. Enciclopedia Italiana - I Appendice (1938). online at http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/andrea-ammonio_%28Enciclopedia-Italiana%29/
  3. Pizzi, Clemente. Un Amico di Erasmo: L'umanista Andrea Ammonio. [With the text of the ecloque Lycas et Ammon and the Elegia de obitu Regis Henrici VII et felici successione Henrici Octavi by Andrea Ammonio. With plates.] Firenze: Felice le Monnier, . [Worldcat OCLC 19057496 etc.]
  4. Deutscher, Thomas B. Andrea Ammonio of Lucca. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 1: 48–50.
  5. Tournoy, Gilbert. The unrecorded poetical production of Andreas Ammonius. Humanistica lovaniensia 37 (): [255]–264. [Worldcat OCLC 879827624.]
  6. Rundle, David. A New Golden Age? More, Skelton and the accession verses of 1509. [1995] See Thomas More: Latin Epigrams
  7. Carlson, David R. Three Tudor Epigrams. Humanistica lovaniensia 45 (): 189–200.
  8. Trapp, J. B. Ammonius, Andreas [Andrea della Rena] (bap. 1476, d. 1517). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Sept. 2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/447) [Include bibliography.]
  9. Carlson, David R. Erasmus and the War-Poets in 1513 Ammonio, Carmeliano, Paleotti, and André. Erasmus of Roterdam Society Yearbook 34:1 (2014): 5–49.

Bernard André (Bernardus Andreas)()

Manuscripts

  1. Hatfield House, MS. Cecil Papers 277/1. De inclita invitissimi regis nostri Henrici octavi in Gallos et Scotos victoria. [Sutton: a poem on the English victories of 1513.]

Editions

  1. Andreas, Bernard. Hymni Christiani Bernardi Andreæ poetae Regii: multiiugo metrorum genere compositi per totius anni circulum: In quos sunt plurimorum illustrium virorum carmina commendatiua in fronte & post calcem ponenda. Impressi sunt in academia Parrhisiana [Parisiis], in chalcographia Ascensiana [Josse Badius], . [Shaaber A319; USTC 144743; Worldcat OCLC 45564982.]
  2. Gairdner, J., ed. Historia Regis Henrici Septimi a Bernardo Andrea Thosolate conscripta; necnon alia quaedam ad eundem regem spectantia. Memorials of King Henry the Seventh. The Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland During the Middle Ages. Rolls Series 10. London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, . 3–153, 307–27. Online at https://archive.org/details/historiaregishen00gair [Latin texts of Vita Henrici VII, Annales Henrici VII, and the French text (and English translation) of Les Douze Triomphes de Henry VII.]
  3. Casper, Dale Edward, ed. The life of Henry VII, according to Bernard Andreas. Edited and translated by Dale Edward Casper. M.A. Diss. University of Minnesota. . [Worldcat OCLC 19607019. Edition and Translation.]
  4. André, Bernard De Vita atque Gestis Henrici Septimi Historia. A hypertext critical edition by Dana F. Sutton. The Philological Museum, 2010. http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/andreas/ [Introduction, Text, and translation.]
  5. André, Bernard. The Life of Henry VII. Translated and Introduced by Daniel Hobbins. New York: Italica P, 2015.

Studies

See "André, Bernard." in Dictionnaire des auteurs anglais: Auteurs actifs dans les champs de l'histoire et de la politique en Angleterre de 1300 à 1600. http://lamop-intranet.univ-paris1.fr/auteurs_anglais/?i=visualisation&j=auteur&k=45

  1. Schütt, M. Bernard Andrés Vita Henrici Septimi. Die englische Biographik de Tudor-Zeit. Hamburg: Friederichsen, de Gruyter & Co., . 39–40.
  2. Kelly, H. A. Divine Providence in the England of Shakespeare's Histories. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, . 75–81.
  3. Tournoy, Gilbert. Two Poems Written by Erasmus for Bernard André. Humanistica lovaniensia 27 (): 45–51.
  4. Tournoy, Gilbert. Bernard André of Toulouse. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 1: 52–53.
  5. Blackwell, C. W. T. Humanism and Politics in English Royal Biography: The Use of Cicero, Plutarch and Sallust in the Vita Henrici Quinti () by Titus Livius de Frulovisi and the Vita Henrici Septimi () by Bernard André. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Sanctandreani. Proceedings of the Fifth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies: St. Andrews, to . Ed. I. D. McFarlane. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 38 Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, . 431–40.
  6. Kaufman, P. I. The Eclipse of the Early Tudor Church: André, Fabyan, and Polydore Vergil. The Politique Churche: Religion and Early Tudor Culture, . Macon, GA: Mercer UP, . 13–31. [On André, Fabyan, Polydore Vergil, and Christopher Urswick.]
  7. Carlson, David R. Reputation and Duplicity: The Texts and Contexts of Thomas More's Epigram on Bernard André. [] See More: Latin Epigrams.
  8. Carlson, David R. Authorial Self-Fashioning: Collected Works, in Manuscript and Print, in Bernard André's Later Career, . English Humanist Books: Writers and Patrons, Manuscript and Print, . Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 60–101, 176–180, 203–215, and Figs. 16–17, between pp.74–75.
  9. Carlson, David R. The writings of Bernard André (). Renaissance Studies 12:2 (): 229–250. (DOI)
  10. Carlson, David R. André, Bernard (c.1450–1522). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Sept. 2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/513)
  11. Carlson, David R. Erasmus and the War-Poets in 1513 Ammonio, Carmeliano, Paleotti, and André. [2014] See Andrea Ammonio.

Cardinal Christopher Bainbridge, Archbishop of York (1462/63–1514)

Check for Episcopal Registers.

See also Salvador Miranda, Christopher Bainbridge, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church; online at http://www2.fiu.edu/~mirandas/bios1511.htm#Bainbridge.

  1. Williams, Robert Folkestone. Lives of the English Cardinals: Including Historical Notices of the Papal Court, From Nicholas Breakspear (Pope Adrian IV) to Thomas Wolsey, Cardinal Legate. 2 Vols. London: Wm. H. Allen, 1868. Vol. II:195–245, 535–539. Online at https://archive.org/details/englishcardinals02willuoft.
  2. Emden, A. B. A Biographical Register of the Scholars of the University of Oxford to A.D. . 3 vols. Oxford: Clarendon P, . 1:91–93.
  3. Chambers, D. S. Cardinal Bainbridge in the Court of Rome: 1509 to 1514. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1965.
    Review:
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 8 (1965): 78–82.
  4. Chambers, D. S. Bainbridge, Christopher (1462/3–1514). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [2008] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/1081).

Stephen Baron (fl. 1508–1513)

According to Null the Sermones declamati coram alma universitate Cantabrigiensi and De regimine principum, [were] first [printed] at London by Wynkyn de Worde (STC 1497, n.d.) and thereafter at least three times at Paris (n.d.). [Check ESTC and Shaaber]

  1. Baron, Stephen. Sermones declamati cora[m] alma vniuersitate Ca[n]tibrigie[n]si per venerandum patrem fratrem Stephanum baronis fratrum minoru[m] de obserua[n]tia nu[n]cupatoru[m], regni Anglie prouinciale[m] vicariu[m], ac [con]fessor i[n] regiu[m]. Second Part: Incipit tractatulus eiusdem venera[n]di patris de regimine principum ad serenissimum regem anglie henricum octavum. London: Impressus londoniis per winandum de worde (in the fletestrete) ad signum solis moram trahentem [after 1509?]. [STC 1497; ESTC S110651.]
  2. Baron, Stephen. Sermones declamati coram alma universitate Cantabrigiensi . . . [Paris:] impressi in achademia parrhisie[n]si, 1510. [Some Editions have Two Parts. Second Part Begins: Incipit tractatulus eiusde[m] venerandi patris De regimi[n]e principum ad Serenissimum Regem Anglie Henricum Octauu[m]. Available Online through Google Books [Google Books; Worldcat; Check ESTC. Klaaber.]
  3. Baron, Stephen. Tractatulus de regimine principum ad serenissimum regem Anglie Henricum Octavum. (1510) Available online through Google Books. [Second Part of previous item?]
  4. Baron, Stephen. Sermones Declamati coram alma universitate Cantabrigiensi per . . . Stephanum baronis . . . Geoffroy, Jean et Enguilbert de Marnef, 1520. Available online through Google Books.
  5. Mroczkowski, P. J., ed. Stephen Baron: De Regimine Principum (1509). Pref. and Epilogue (pp.147–58) by Germain Marc'hadour. American University Studies Series 17, Classical Languages and Literature 5. New York: Peter Lang, 1990. [Edition and translation of a Mirror of Princes dedicated by the Franciscan preacher Stephen Baron to the young Henry VIII.]
    Review:
    1. Maria Dowling, Moreana 110 (1992): 69–71.
  6. Null, Ashley. Baron, Stephen (fl. 1508–1513). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2008] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/1500).

John Batmanson (Bathmanson, Batemanson) (d 16 November 1531)

For a brief bio. see, E. F. Rogers, SL Intro. to #26, p.114; and CWE 7:#1099/18–20, n4 on p.417; and #1113/9–10; cf. Emden BRUO I:132.

  1. Letter from Thomas More to a Monk [John Batmanson], [March–September 1519]. See Letters and Papers of Sir Thomas More.
  2. Thompson, E. Margaret. The Carthusian Order in England. London: Society for promoting Christian knowledge, 1930. 342–43, 389, 390, 413, 494.
  3. Knowles, Dom David. Appendix I: Sir Thomas More's Letter To a Monk. The Religious Orders in England. 3 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1959. Rpt. with corrections 1971. III: 469. [Knowles identifies the recipient of More's Letter to a Monk (Rogers #83) as John Batmanson the Carthusian (d. 1531).]
  4. CFG & PGB. John Batmanson (d 16 November 1531). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 1: 99–100.
  5. Rowntree, C. B. Batmanson, John (d. 1531). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [May 2006] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/1705). [Check Bibliography.]

Lady Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby (1443–1509)

Editions

  1. Ingram, John Kells, ed. The Earliest English Translation of . . . the De imitatione Christi. Extra Series, 63. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner for the Early English Text Society, 1893; rpt. 1973. Available online at https://archive.org/details/earliestenglisht00atkirich [Books I–III translated by William Atkinson, Book IV by Lady Margaret Beaufort.]
  2. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works. Series I. Printed Writings, 1500–1600. Part 2, Volume 4. Early Tudor Translators: Margaret Beaufort, Margaret More Roper, and Mary Basset. Selected and Introduced by Lee Cullen Khanna. Aldershot, England: Ashgate, c.2001. [Facsimile of Margaret Beaufort's translation of Book IV of the De Imitatione Christi.]
  3. Nugent, E. M., ed. Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 18–24. [Excerpt. Statutes of Christ's College, Cambridge.]

Studies

  1. Cooper, C. H. The Lady Margaret. A Memoir of Margaret Countess of Richmond and Derby. Ed. J. E. B. Mayor. Cambridge: Deighton Bell, 1874.
  2. Axon, W. E. A. The Lady Margaret as a Lover of Literature. The Library 2nd ser. 8 (1907): 34–41.
  3. McLean, N. Books Given to the Library of Christ's College, Cambridge, by the Lady Margaret. The Library 2nd ser. 8 (1907): 218–23.
  4. Scott, R.F. On the Contracts for the Tomb of Lady Margaret Beaufort. Archaeologia 66 (1914–15): 365–76.
  5. Routh, E. M. G. Lady Margaret: A Memoir of Lady Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond & Derby, Mother of Henry VII. London: Oxford University Press; Henry Milford, 1924
  6. McElroy, M. D. Literary Patronage of Margaret Beaufort and Henry VII: A Study of Renaissance Propaganda (1483–1509). Diss. U of Texas, 1964.
  7. Reynolds, E. E. St. John Fisher and the Lady Margaret Beaufort. [1969] See Lady Margaret Beaufort.
  8. Simon, L. Of Virtue Rare: Margaret Beaufort, Matriarch of the House of Tudor. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1982.
  9. Underwood, Malcolm G. The Lady Margaret and Her Cambridge Connections. Sixteenth Century Journal 13:1 (1982): 67–82.
  10. Warnicke, Retha M. The Lady Margaret, Countess of Richmond (d.1509) as Seen by Bishop Fisher and by Lord Morley. [1982] See Fisher: General Studies.
  11. Underwood, M. G. Politics and Piety in the Household of Lady Margaret Beaufort. Journal of Eccesiastical History 38 (1987): 39–52.
  12. Lowry, M. Caxton, St. Winifred, and Lady Margaret Beaufort. The Library 6th ser. 5 (1982): 101–17.
  13. Knighton, C.S. Margaret Beaufort. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. Rpt. with three Volumes in One with separate pagination as Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Volumes 1–3 Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2003. 1: 109–111.
  14. Jones, M. K., and M. G. Underwood. The King's Mother: Lady Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Darby. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1992. [Sum.: Abstract included by CUP with book.]
    Reviews:
    1. G. Bedouelle, Moreana 121 (1995): 91–96.
    2. D. MacCullough, Sixteenth Century Journal 24 (1993): 739–40.
  15. Jones, Michael K. Beaufort, Margaret, Countess of Richmond and Derby (1443–1509). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/1863))
  16. Hosington, Brenda M. Beaufort, Margaret. The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature. Edited by Garrett A. Sullivan, Jr. and Alan Stewart. Oxford: Blackwell, 2012. ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/b.9781405194495.2012.x)
  17. Fisher, Sally. Margaret R: Lady Margaret Beaufort’s Self-fashioning and Female Ambition. Virtuous or Villainess? The Image of the Royal Mother from the Early Medieval to the Early Modern Era. Edited by Carey Fleiner, and Elena Woodacre. Queenship and Power. New York: Palgrave Macmillan US, 2016. 151–172.

Lord Berners, John Bourchier (c.1467/69–1533)

For Berners and More, see Rogers #137/1 and note, p.315.

See ESTC.

Editions

  1. Bourchier, J., Lord Berners, trans. Here begynneth the first volum of sir J. Froyssart. London: Richard Pynson, 1523. Facsimile Rpt. The English Experience 257. Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1970. [STC 11396.]
  2. Bourchier, J., Lord Berners, trans. Here begynneth the thirde and fourthe boke of sir J. Froissart. London: Richard Pynson, 1525. Facsimile Rpt. The English Experience 250. Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1970. [STC 11397.]
  3. Henley, W. E., ed. The Chronicle of Froissart. Trans. John Bourchier, Lord Berners. 6 vols. London: David Nutt, 1901–1903.

Selections

  1. Nugent, E. M., ed. John Bourchier, c.1467–1533. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 485–89, 586–97. [Excerpts from the translations of Froissart's Chronicle, and Huon of Bordeaux.]

Studies

  1. Lewis, C. S. English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, excluding Drama. Oxford History of English Literature, Vol. 3. London: Oxford UP, 1954. 1973. 149–56.
  2. Emden, A. B. A Biographical Register of the Scholars of the University of Oxford to A.D. . 3 vols. Oxford: Clarendon P, . 1:230.
  3. Benson, L. D. The Use of a Physical Viewpoint in Berners' Froissart. Modern Language Quarterly 20 (1959): 333–38.
  4. Kane, G. An Accident of History: Lord Berners's Translation of Froissart's Chronicles. Chaucer Review 21 (1986/87): 217–25.

Add ODNB.

Antonio Bonvisi (Buonvisi) (d.1558)

For the biography of Girolamo Bonvisi, a relative of Antonio Bonvisi, see CE 1:171.

  1. Letter of Thomas More to Antonio Bonvisi, Tower of London, 1535. See Thomas More's Letters.
  2. Ford, C. D. Good Master Bonvisi. Clergy Review ns 27 (1947): 228–35. [Sullivan 1:360–61.]
  3. Schoeck, Richard J. Antony Bonvisi, the Heywoods and the Ropers. Notes and Queries 197 (1952): 178–79. [Geritz F284. On Antonio Bonvisi's relationship with William Rastell, William Roper, and Richard Heywood (John Heywood's brother.)]
  4. Luzzati, Michele. Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani vol.15 (1972), pp.295–99. Online at http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/antonio-buonvisi_%28Dizionario-Biografico%29/.
  5. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. The Apple of my Eye: Thomas More to Antonio Bonvisi—A Reading and a Translation. [1981] See Thomas More: Prison Letters.
  6. Martin, C.T., rev. Basil Morgan. Bonvisi, Antonio (1470/75–1558). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/1500)

Thomas Bourchier, Cardinal and Archbishop of Canterbury (c.1411–1486)

Luminarium and Wikipedia

  1. Williams, Robert Folkestone. Lives of the English Cardinals: Including Historical Notices of the Papal Court, From Nicholas Breakspear (Pope Adrian IV) to Thomas Wolsey, Cardinal Legate. 2 Vols. London: Wm. H. Allen, 1868. Vol. II:124–151. Online at https://archive.org/details/englishcardinals02willuoft.
  2. Emden, A. B. A Biographical Register of the Scholars of the University of Oxford to A.D. . 3 vols. Oxford: Clarendon P, . 1:230–232.
  3. Clark, Linda. Bourchier, Thomas (c.1411–1486). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/2993)

See also Salvador Miranda, Thomas Bourchier, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church; online at http://www2.fiu.edu/~mirandas/bios1467.htm#Bourchier.

Henry Stafford, Second Duke of Buckingham (4 September 1454–2 November 1483)

  1. Check Wikipedia for 2nd and 3rd Dukes

Edward Stafford, Third Duke of Buckingham (3 February 1478–17 May 1521)

  1. Harris, B. J. The Trial of the Third Duke of Buckingham—A Revisionist View. American Journal of Legal History 20 (1976): 15–26.
  2. Rawcliffe, Carole. The Staffords, Earls of Stafford and Dukes of Buckingham, 1394–1521. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought: Third Series, Volume II. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1978, 2008.
  3. Harris, B. J. Edward Stafford, Third Duke of Buckingham, 1478–1521. Stanford: Stanford UP, 1986.
    Review:
    1. H. Miller, English Historical Review 104 (1989): 731–32.

Add ODNB.

Pietro Carmeliano (Carmigliano) [Petrus Carmelianus, Peter Carmelian] ()

Editions and Excerpts

  1. Kelly, H. A. Dedicatory Epistle for Pietro Carmeliano's Versified Life of St. Catherine of Alexandria, and Pietro Carmeliano, Epistle to England Urging Her to Rejoice Over the End of the Civil Wars and the Birth of Prince Arthur. Divine Providence in the England of Shakespeare's Histories. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1970. 315–24.

Studies

  1. Guerrini, Paolo. Pietro Carmeliano da Brescia, segretario reale d'Inghilterra. Brixia Sacra [Brescia: Editrice Brixia Sacra,] 9 (1918): 33–40.
  2. Weiss, Roberto. Humanism in England During the Fifteenth Century. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 3rd ed. 1967. 169–72.
  3. Kelly, H. A. Divine Providence in the England of Shakespeare's Histories. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1970. 73–75.
  4. Firpo, Massimo. Carmeliano, Pietro. Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani vol.20 (1977), pp.295–99. Online at http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/pietro-carmeliano_%28Dizionario_Biografico%29/
  5. Modigliani, Anna. Un nuovo manoscritto di Pietro Carmeliano: Le Epistole dello Pseudo-Falaride nella Trinity College Library di Dublino. Humanistica Lovaniensia 33 (1984): 86–102.
  6. Tournoy, Gilbert. Petrus Carmelianus of Brescia. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 1: 270.
  7. Carlson, David R. King Arthur and Court Poems for the Birth of Arthur Tudor in 1486. Humanistica Lovaniensia 36 (1987): 147–83, esp. 174–83. [V. Pietro Carmeliano: Suasoria Laeticiae.]
  8. Carlson, David R. The Occasional Poetry of Pietro Carmeliano. Aevum 61 (1987): 485–502.
  9. Carlson, David R. Politicking and Manuscript Presentation: Pietro Carmeliano's Development of Publishing Methods, 1482–86. English Humanist Books: Writers and Patrons, Manuscript and Print, 1475–1525. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1993. 37–59, 195–203, 174–80, and Figs. 12–13, between pp.74–75.
  10. J. B. Trapp, Carmeliano, Pietro (c.1451–1527). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Sept. 2010] ( http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4699)
  11. Carlson, David R. Erasmus and the War-Poets in 1513 Ammonio, Carmeliano, Paleotti, and André. [2014] See Andrea Ammonio.

William Catesby (d.1485)

  1. Roskell, J. S. William Catesby, Counsellor to Richard III. Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library 62 (1959): 145–74. Rpt. in Parliament and Politics in Late Medieval England. History Series 7, 8, 20. 3 vols. London: Hambledon P, vols. 1–2: 1981, vol. 3: 1983. 2: 307–336. Online at https://www.escholar.manchester.ac.uk/
  2. Williams, Daniel. The Hastily Drawn up Will of William Catesby, 25th August 1485. Leicestershire Archaeological and Historical Society Transactions 51 (1975–76): 43–51. [Also contains a good deal of information on Catesby's successful legal and political career.]
  3. Horrox, Rosemary. Catesby, William (b. in or before 1446, d. 1485). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Jan. 2008] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4884) [Include bibliography.]

Catherine (Katherine) of Aragon, Queen Consort (16 December 1485–7 January 1536)

Henry VIII's other wives will be included in the English Reformation Bibliography.

  1. Forrest, William. The History of Grisild the Second: A Narrative, in Verse, of the Divorce of Queen Katherine of Aragon. Ed. W. D. Macray. Roxburghe Club 101. London: Whittington and Wilkins, 1875. Online at https://archive.org/details/historyofgrisild00forrrich. [Sullivan 1:361. An account of the divorce of Katherine of Aragon (Griseld), written during the reign of Queen Mary and completed on 25 June 1558.]
  2. Du Boys, Albert. Catherine d'Aragon et les origines du schisme anglican. Paris: V. Palmé, 1880. Online at https://archive.org/details/catherinedaragon00dubo. Trans. as Catherine of Aragon and the Source of the English Reformation. Ed. from the French by Charlotte M. Yonge. London: Hurst and Blackett, 1881. Online at https://archive.org/details/catherinearagon01cathgoog. [Sullivan 1:296.]
  3. Froude, James Anthony. The Divorce of Catherine of Aragon: The Story as Told by the Imperial Ambassadors Resident at the Court of Henry VIII. London: Longmans, Green; New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1891. Online at https://archive.org/details/cu31924027014319. [Sullivan 1:374.]
  4. Claremont, Francesca. Catherine of Aragon. London: Robert Hale, 1939. [Sullivan 1:200.]
  5. Mattingly, Garrett. Catherine of Aragon. Boston: Little, Brown, & Co., 1942. Rpt. London: Jonathan Cape, 1971. [Sullivan 2:298.]
    Review:
    1. Edward V. Cardinal, The Catholic Historical Review 28:1 (1942): 113–115.
  6. Mattingly, Garrett. Renaissance Diplomacy. London: Penguin Books; Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1955, 1964. 121, 151, 155, 160, 162–163, 174, 209–210. Online at https://archive.org/details/RenaissanceDiplomacy.
  7. Anglo, Sydney. The London Pageants for the Reception of Katharine of Aragon: November 1501. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 26 (1963): 53–89.
  8. Paul, J. E. Catherine of Aragon and her Friends. London: Burns & Oates, 1966.
  9. Dowling, Maria. Humanist Support for Katherine of Aragon. Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 57 (1984): 46–55.
  10. Giles Tremlett. Catherine of Aragon. London: Faber & Faber, 2010.

Include entries from ODNB and CE.

George Cavendish (1494–c.1562)

Cavendish's Life of Wolsey

Manuscripts

For MSS descriptions, see Sylvester and Beal.

  1. R. S. Sylvester. Appendix E. The Secondary Manuscripts. George Cavendish: The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey. Early English Text Society No. 243. London: Oxford University Press, 1959. 274–88 + pp.ix–xi. [Describes 29 secondary MSS; the autograph is described in the Introduction.]
  2. A.S.G. Edwards, Unrecorded Manuscripts of George Cavendish's Life of Wolsey. Notes and Queries 254 (December 2009): 513.
  3. Beal, P., ed. George Cavendish. Index of English Literary Manuscripts. Vol. I: 1450–1625. 5 vols. London: Mansell; New York: R. R. Bowker, 1980. 1/2: ***–***. Online Edition at http://www.celm-ms.org.uk/introductions/CavendishGeorge.html and http://www.celm-ms.org.uk/authors/CavendishGeorge.html. [The online catalogue lists 57 manuscripts.]
  4. BL, Egerton MS 2402. [Autograph, c.1556–58. See Beal *CvG 1 and CvG 4; Sylvester ix–xi, and frontispiece for reproduction of lower portion folio 88v; includes Cavendish's Metrical Visions.]
  5. Bodleian Library Oxford, MS Dugdale 28. [Beal CvG 2; Sylvester no.3, p.279; only copy to include Cavendish's Metrical Visions.]
Editions
  1. Cavendish, George. The negotiations of Thomas Woolsey, the great cardinall of England, containing his life and death, viz. 1. The originall of his promotion. 2. The continuance in his magnificence. 3. His fall, death, and buriall. Composed by one of his owne servants, being his gentleman-usher. London: printed for William Sheeres [Sheares], 1641. [Wing C1619 and C1619aA; ESTC R223198 and R19386; Sullivan I:176. For other Early Modern editions (8 more?) see ESTC***. This is a garbled edition, see Cavendish xi–xii.]
  2. Wordsworth, Christopher, ed. Cardinal Wolsey. By Cavendish, his Gentleman Usher. Ecclesiastical biography, or, Lives of eminent men connected with the history of religion in England: from the commencement of the Reformation to the Revolution. 6 vols. London: Francis & John Rivington, 1810; 4th ed. 1853. 1: 319–554. Online at https://archive.org/details/ecclesiasticalbi01word [Based on the autograph BL, Egerton MS 2402, which Singer discovered, but with some changes to spelling and punctuation, see Cavendish xii–xiii.]
  3. Singer, S. W., ed. The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions. 2 vols. Chiswick: ***, 1825; Rpt. London: ***, 1827. [1827 edition omits the Metrical Visions.]
  4. Morley, H., ed. The Life of Cardinal Wolsey By George Cavendish. To Which is Added Thomas Churchyard's Tragedy of Wolsey. London: George Routledge and Sons, 1885. 1887. [A popular edition. Rpts. Singer's 1827 edition.]
  5. Sylvester, R. S., ed. The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey. By George Cavendish. London: Oxford UP (EETS 243), 1959. [Based on autograph BL, Egerton MS 2402.]
  6. Lockyer, Roger, ed. Thomas Wolsey, late Cardinal: His Life and Death Written by George Cavendish, his Gentleman Usher. London: Folio Society, 1962.
  7. Sylvester, R. S., and D. P. Harding, eds. The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey. Two Tudor Lives. The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey, by George Cavendish and The Life of Sir Thomas More, by William Roper. New Haven: Yale UP, 1962. 1–193. [Modernized spelling editions of Roper's and Cavendish's Lives.]
    Review:
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Clergy Review 45 (1960): 11–23.
  8. George Cavendish. The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey. Ed. Richard S. Sylvester. Early English Text Society No. 243. London: Oxford University Press, 1959. Copytext: British Library Egerton 2402. Electronic transcription by Ian Lancashire, assisted by Robert Whalen. Renaissance Electronic Texts 2.1 (1997). http://www.library.utoronto.ca/utel/ret/cavendish/cavendish.html
  9. George Cavendish. Thomas Wolsey, the Late Cardinal. Unabridged. Read by David Thorn. Alcazar AudioWorks, 2009. Distributed by Blackstone Audio. [Audio Recording]
Selections
  1. Nugent, E. M., ed. Life of Thomas Wolsey. By George Cavendish. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 534–546. [Some short excerpts from Cavendish's Life.]
  2. Newman, Bertram, ed. George Cavendish: Wolsey's Arrest (Life of Cardinal Wolsey). English Historians: Selected Passages. Forward by C. V. Wedgwood. London: Oxford UP for the English Association, 1957. 9–11. [Summ.: Geritz C011.]
  3. Creeth, E., ed. From Thomas Wolsey, late Cardinall, his Lyffe and Deathe. By George Cavendish. Tudor Prose, 1513–1570. Garden City, NY: Anchor Books, 1969. 275–363, 487–89. [First half of Cavendish's Life.]
Studies
  1. Hunter, Joseph. Who Wrote Cavendish's Life of Wolsey? London: Richard Rees, 1814. Rpt. in The Life of Cardinal Wolsey and Metrical Visions. Ed. S. W. Singer. 2 vols. Chiswick: ***, 1825. Rpt. London: ***, 1827. 2: xlii–lxxii.
  2. Krapp, G. P. The Rise of English Literary Prose. New York: Oxford UP, 1915. Rpt. New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing Co., 1963. 416–21.
  3. Schütt, M. Cavendishs Life of Wolsey, und Die Überlieferung von Cavendishs Life of Wolsey. Die englische Biographik de Tudor-Zeit. Hamburg: Friederichsen, de Gruyter & Co., 1930. 97–102, 140–43.
  4. Stauffer, D. A. English Biography Before 1700. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1930. Rpt. New York: Russell & Russell, 1964. 122–29.
  5. Steuert, H. Cavendish's Life of Cardinal Wolsey. Downside Review 57(?) (Jan. 1939): 23–45.
  6. Wiley, P. L. Renaissance Exploitation of Cavendish's Life of Wolsey. Studies in Philology 43 (1946): 121–46.
  7. Steiner, F. G. A Note on Cavendish's Life of Cardinal Wolsey. English 9 (1952/53): 51–54.
  8. Rossi, S. George Cavendish e il tema della Fortuna. English Miscellany 9 (1958): 51–76. [On Fortune in The Mirror of Princes, The Life of Wolsey, and the Metrical Visions.]
  9. Sylvester, R. S. Cavendish's Life of Wolsey: The Artistry of a Tudor Biographer. Studies in Philology 57 (1960): 44–71.
  10. Sylvester, R. S. Additional Notes to Cavendish's Life of Wolsey. Notes and Queries ns 7 (1960): 372.
  11. Bennett, J. A. W. Wanley's Life of Wolsey. Bodleian Library Record 7:1 (1962): 50–52.
  12. Edwards, A. S. G. Thomas Cromwell and Cavendish's Life of Wolsey: The Uses of a Tudor Biography. Revue de l'Université d'Ottawa 43 (1973): 292–96.
  13. May, S. W. Cavendish's Use of Hall's Chronicle. Neophilologus 59 (1975): 293–300. [Argues that Cavendish drew heavily on Hall's Chronicle for the first half of his Life, while trying discretely to refute Hall's characterization of Wolsey.]
  14. Wooden, W. W. The Art of Partisan Biography: George Cavendish's Life of Wolsey. Renaissance and Reformation ns 1 [os 13] (1977): 24–35.
  15. Burchfield, R. R. S. Sylvester: The Editing of Cavendish's Life of Wolsey. Moreana 65/66 (1980): 81–85.
  16. Anderson, J. H. Cavendish: Patterns without Meaning. Biographical Truth: The Representation of Historical Persons in Tudor-Stuart Writing. New Haven: Yale UP, 1984. 27–39, 209–10. [Sum.: G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 109 (1992): 97–98. Portrays Cavendish's Life as artless and confused.]
  17. Crewe, J. The Wolsey Paradigm? Criticism 30 (1988): 153–69. [A rather confused New Historicist reading of Cavendish's Life. Attacks Anderson's interpretation of Cavendish, and contrasts Roper's More unfavourably with Cavendish's Wolsey.]
  18. Gardiner, L. R. George Cavendish: An Early Tudor Political Commentator? Parergon ns 6 (1988): 77–87.
  19. Britnell, Richard. Penitence and Prophecy: George Cavendish on the Last State of Cardinal Wolsey. Journal of Eccesiastical History 48 (1997): 263–81.
  20. Britnell, Richard. Service, Loyalty, and Betrayal in Cavendish's The Life and Death of Cardinal Wolsey. Moreana 161 (2005): 3–30. [Sum.: p.3.]
  21. Burrow, Colin. The Reformation of the Household. Cultural Reformations: Medieval and Renaissance in Literary History. Ed. Brian Cummings and James Simpson. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010. 459–79. [Burrow deals with Cavendish (465–72) and Roper (472–77).]
  22. A. S. G. Edwards, Cavendish, George (b. 1494, d. in or before 1562?),. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Jan. 2014] ( http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4699)

Metrical Visions

Editions

See Singer 1825.

  1. Fisher, M. R., ed. George Cavendish's Metrical Visions. Diss. Columbia U, 1967. [DA 28 (1969): 5014A. An edition.]
  2. Edwards, A. S. G. Metrical Visions. New York: Renaissance English Text Society, 1980.
    Review:
    1. W. W. Wooden, Analytical and Enumerative Bibliography 6:2 (1982): 116–17.
Selections
  1. Hammond, E. P., ed. George Cavendish: Metrical Visions. English Verse between Chaucer and Surrey. Durham, NC: Duke UP; London: Cambridge UP, 1927. 368–82, 527–37. [Selections.]
Studies
  1. Edwards, A. S. G. Some Borrowings by Cavendish from Lydgate's Fall of Princes. Notes and Queries ns 18 (1971): 207–09.
  2. Edwards, A. S. G. A Tudor Redactor at Work. Yearbook of English Studies 3 (1973): 10–13.
  3. Edwards, A. S. G. The Date of George Cavendish's Metrical Visions. Philological Quarterly 53 (1974): 128–32.
  4. Edwards, A. S. G. The Dugdale Manuscript of George Cavendish's Metrical Visions. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 68 (1974): 167–70.
  5. Edwards, A. S. G. George Cavendish's Metrical Visions: A New Manuscript. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 69 (1975): 388–91.
  6. Edwards, A. S. G. The Author as Scribe: Cavendish's Metrical Visions and MS. Egerton 2402. The Library 5th ser. 29 (1974): 446–49.

Richard Charnock (Charnok) (d c April 1505)

Richard Charnock was a friend of John Colet, who introduced him to Erasmus, see Allen #106, 108, 113, 115, 116, 126, etc. Not in ODNB.

  1. Emden, A. B. A Biographical Register of the Scholars of the University of Oxford to A.D. . 3 vols. Oxford: Clarendon P, . 1:394.
  2. CFG. Richard Charnock d c April 1505. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 1: 300–301.
  3. Smith, David M., et al., eds. Richard Charnock (Charnok) 1495–1505. The Heads of Religious Houses: England and Wales, III. 1377–1540. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2008. 472.

John Claymond (1457?–d 19 November 1537)

For references to Claymond by Erasmus and More, see Allen 3:#990 and Rogers #196/318–21, and n. on p.479.

  1. Emden, A. B. A Biographical Register of the Scholars of the University of Oxford to A.D. . 3 vols. Oxford: Clarendon P, . 1:428–430. Lists Claymond's MSS, including some that had originally belonged to Grocyn.]
  2. CFG. John Claymond of Frampton, d 19 November 1537. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 1: 307–308.
  3. Woolfson, Jonathan John Claymond, Pliny the Elder, and the Early History of Corpus Christi College, Oxford. English Historical Review 112:448 (September 1997): 882–903.
  4. Woolfson, Jonathan. Claymond, John (1467/8–1536). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Jan. 2008] ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/5565)

John Clement (d. 1 July 1572)

  1. For the life of John Clement, Allen 2:#388/173n, p.198; Rogers note to #25/45, pp.78–79, For more on More's attitude to Clement, see Allen #388/173–75, p.198 (=Rogers #16) above and CW 4:40/14–19 and nn. on p.291; and p.198 (=Rogers #16) above and CW 4:40/14–19 and nn. on p.291; and Rogers #71, #72 (Allen #907).
  2. Leland, John. Epithalamium Ioannis Clementis Medici, et Margaritae [c. March, 1526]. John Leland, Two Latin Masques, edited by Dana F. Sutton (Philological Museum, 2007), online at http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/lelandpomps/ [Epithalamium in honour of the Marriage of John Clement and Margaret Giggs (c. March, 1526).]
  3. Wenkebach, Ernst. John Clement: ein Englischer Humanist und Arzt des sechzehnten Jahrhunderts. Ein Lebensbild in Umrissen. Leipzig: J. A. Barth, 1925.
  4. Reed, Arthur William. John Clement and his Books. The Library 4th ser., VI:4 (1926): 329–39.
  5. Mercati, Giovanni. Sopra Giovanni Clement e i suoi manoscritti. La Bibliofilia 28 (1926): 81–89.
  6. De Vocht, Henry, ed. Literae Virorum Eruditorum ad Fransciscum Craneveldium 1522–1528. Humanistica Lovaniensia 1. Louvain: Librairie Universitaire, Uystpruyst, 1928. Intro. to Ep.#154, pp.425–26. See also LCB IV: #109, HL 44 (1995): 54–55.
  7. McConica, J. K. English Humanists and Reformation Politics. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1965. 269–72 and passim.
  8. CFG & PGB. John Clement d 1 July 1572. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 1: 311–12.
  9. Merriam, Thomas. John Clement: His Identity, and his Marshfoot House in Essex. Moreana 97 (1988): 145–52. Online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana97pages145-152.pdf [Geritz F198.]
  10. Gwyn, Peter. The King's Cardinal: The Rise and Fall of Thomas Wolsey. London: Pimlico, 1992. 342–43.
  11. Wallis, Patrick. Clement, John (d. 1572). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Oct. 2008] ( http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5603)

Margaret Giggs Clement (d. 6 July 1570)

  1. Wilby, Noel MacDonald. Sir Thomas More and the Refugees in Flanders. Dublin Review 194 (1938): 315–29. [Geritz F347. On John and Margaret Giggs Clement and their family.]
  2. Schoeck, Richard J. Two Notes on Margaret Gigs Clement, Foster-Daughter of Sir Thomas More. Notes and Queries 194 (1949): 532–33. [Geritz F299.]
  3. Schoeck, Richard J. Thomas Gygges, Tudor Lawyer. Notes and Queries 195 (1950): 269–71. [Geritz F295.]
  4. Schoeck, R.J.. Margaret Giggs d 6 July 1570. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 2: 97.
  5. Bennett, Vanora. Portrait of an Unknown Woman: A Novel. [2007] See Novels and Dialogues about More.
  6. Bowker, Margaret. Clement, Margaret (1508–1570). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Oct. 2008] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5604)

Leonard Cox (Coxe) (c1495–1549 or later)

Editions

For editions of Cox's works, see Breeze (1987–88) below.

  1. Cox, Leonard. De laudibus celeberrimae Cracoviensis Academiae, Leonardi Coxi Britanni, Octavo Idus Decembris habita Oratio anno 1518. Kraków, Per Hieronim Wietor, [6th December] 1518. [USTC 240358.]
  2. Cox, Leonard. Libellus de erudienda iuventate per Leonardum Coxum Anglum. Excusum Cracoviae [Kraków], per Hieronymum Vietorem [Hieronim Wietor] Anno a Christo nato Millesimo Quingentesimo Vigesimo sexto. Mense Aprili [April 1526]. [See modern edition and translation by Breeze and Glomski (1991) below.]
  3. Breeze, A., and J. Glomski, eds. An early British Treatise on Education: Leonard Cox's De erudienda iuventate (1526). Humanistica lovaniensia 40 (1991): 112–67. [Sum.: G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 114 (1993): 107. Edition and translation.]
    Review:
    1. Nicholas I. Orme, History of Education 21/3 (1992) 337–38.

The Art and Crafte of Rhetoricke (1532, redated from 1524)

A partial adaptation of Philipp Melanchthon's institutiones rhetoricae (dealing only with invention. For Cox's own original treatise on Rhetoric, see De erudienda iuventate (1526) above.

  1. Cox, Leonard. The art or crafte of rhetoryke. [Imprinted at London: In Fletestrete by saynt Dunstones chyrche, at the sygne of the George, by me Robert Redman, The yere of our lorde god a thousande, fyue hundred and two and thyrty [1532]]. Available through the EEBO/TCP Project http://ota.ox.ac.uk/tcp/ as item A19517 (web,epub,xml,image). For html format see http://tei.it.ox.ac.uk/tcp/Texts-HTML/free/A19/A19517.html and http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/25612 [STC 5947; ESTC S105098.]
  2. Cox, Leonard. The a[rte] or crafte of rhethoryke. Imprinted at London: In Fletestrete by Mr. Robert Redman, dwellyng at the sygne of the George, [ca. 1535?]]. [STC2 5947.5 (formerly 5946); ESTC S109267. STC date originally conjectured as 1524.] Facsimile Rpt. (as STC 5946). The English Experience 862. Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1977.
  3. Cox, Leonard. The Arte or Crafte of Rhethoryke. Edited by Frederic Ives Carpenter. English Studies, 5. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1899. For an online facsimile see https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Arte_or_Crafte_of_Rhethoryke.
  4. Nugent, E. M., ed. Leonard Cox: The Art or Craft of Rhetoric. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 138–42. [Excerpts.]

Works edited and Translated by Leonard Cox

  1. Pontano, Giovanni. Ioannis Iouiani Pontani De laudibus divinis opusculum cum argumentis. Impressum Cracouiae [Kraków] in aedibus Ioannis [Jan] Haller, 1520. [USTC 240658; Shaaber C361.]
  2. Hadrianus VI. Adriani cardinalis Venatio, una cum scholiis. Cracouiae [Kraków] in aedibus Hieronymi Vietoris [Hieronim Wietor], 1524. [Shaaber gives a different edition or date: mense Iunio 1529.] [USTC 240757; BL 11405.b.5; cf. Shaaber C360.]
  3. Statius, Publius Papinius. >Sylvae cum scholiis Leonardo Coxo Anglo adiectis. Kraków, In aedibus Maciej Szarfenberg, 1527.
  4. Krzycki, Andrzej De afflictione ecclesiae commentarius in Psalmum XXI. Leonardus Coxus Anglus Lectori. In imaginem passi redemptoris nostri / A. Cri. Ad clarissimvm antistitem Premisliensem operis authore[m] [...] Stanislai Hosij [Stanisław Hozjusz] clientuli deditissimi Epigramma. per Andream Cricium, episcopum Praemislien[sem]. Impressum Cracouiae: per Hieronymum Vietorem, Men. Ia. M.D.XX.VII [January 1527]. [Worldcat OCLC 838775854.]
  5. Quintus Horatius Flaccus. Quinti Hora. Flacci Epodon: ad Aldini exemplaris fidem recognitu[m] seculari carmine adiuncto. Impressum Cracouiae: per Mathiam Scharffenberger; impensis vero Marci Scharffenberger [...], 10 XI 1527. [Worldcat OCLC 864173727.]
  6. Cicero, Marcus Tullius. Ad M. Brutum oratorem. Kraków, Maciej Szarfenberg, 1528. [USTC 243539.]
  7. Palsgrave, John. Lesclarcissement de la langue francoyse compose par maistre Iehan Palsgraue Angloyse natyf de Londres, et gradue de Paris. [[London?]: The imprintyng [by Richard Pynson, ca. 1524] fynysshed by Iohan Haukyns the. xviii. daye of July], Anno uerbi incarnati. M.D.XXX [1530] [STC 19166; ESTC S104266. According to CE 1:354, includes a prefatory Latin poem by Leonard Cox.]
  8. Erasmus, Desiderius. The paraphrase of Erasm[us] Roterdame vpon [the] epistle of sai[n]t Paule vnto his discyple Titus. lately tra[n]slated into englysshe and fyrste a goodly prologue. . . [Translated by Leonard Cox.] [[London] : Imprented by Ioh[a]n Byddell in London in Fletestrete next to the Flete Brydge], [1534]. [STC 10503; ESTC S109940.]
  9. Lily, William. De octo orationis partium constructione libellus, aeditus a Guil. Lilio emendatus ab Eras. Roter.& scholiis no[n] solum Henrici Primæi, ucium etiam doctissimis Leonar. Coxi illustratus. [Londini : ex officina Thomæ Bertheleti regii impressoris. Cum priuilegio ad impremendum solum, Anno. M.D. XL.] [1540] [STC 15604; ESTC S103869. Edited by Erasmus with notes by Cox. Dedicated to Thomas Cromwell.]
  10. Erasmus, Desiderius. The seconde tome or volume of the paraphrase of Erasmus vpon the newe testament: conteynyng the Epistles of S. Paul, and other the Apostles. Wherunto is added a paraphrase vpon the Reuelacion of S. Iohn. [Translated by Miles Coverdale, John Old, and Leonard Cox; edited by Coverdale.] Impriented at London: in Flete-strete at the signe of the Sunne by Edwarde Whitchurche, the xvi. daye of August. Cum priuilegio ad imprimendum solum. Anno do. 1549. [STC 2854.6, 2854.7; ESTC S5153, S107068; STC2 2854.7 is a variant edition. Includes a new preface by Cox to his translation of the Paraphrase on Timothy.]

See also Johannes Murmellius (Murmel), USTC 305014 and 305015.

Studies

  1. Letter from Leonard Cox to Erasmus, Cracow, 28 March 1527. Allen 7:#1803, pp.***–***; CWE 13:#1803, pp.3–9.
  2. From John Leland's Epigrammata (1589). [c1529?] John Leland, Epigrammata (printed 1589), edited by Dana Sutton, online at http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/lelandpoems/ See CXXVII on Leonard Cox.
  3. Carpenter, Frederic Ives. Leonard Cox and the First English Rhetoric. Modern Language Notes 13:5 (May 1898): 146–47. Online at https://archive.org/details/jstor-2917751.
  4. McConica, J. K. English Humanists and Reformation Politics. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1965. 53,62,66,121,127,140–41,147,167,169–70,193–94,200,247. [For MSS containing three letters of Cox, see pp.297–98.]
  5. CFG & PGB. Leonard Cox of Thame, documented 1514–1549. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 1: 359–360.
  6. Breeze, Andrew. Leonard Cox, a Welsh Humanist in Poland and Hungary. The National Library of Wales Journal 25 (1987–88): 399–410. [Lists Leonard Cox's publications.]
  7. Ryle, S. F. Cox, Leonard (b. c.1495, d. in or after 1549). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] ( http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/6525)
  8. Glomski, Jacqueline L. Careerism at Cracow: The Dedicatory Letters of Rudolf Agricola Junior, Valentin Eck, and Leonard Cox (1510–1530). Self-presentation and Social Identification: The Rhetoric and Pragmatics of of Letter Writing in Early Modern Times. Supplementa Humanistica Lovaniensia. Ed Toon Van Houdt et al. Louvain: Leuven University Press, 2002. 165–82.
  9. Glomski, Jacqueline L. Patronage and humanist literature in the age of the Jagiellons: court and career in the writings of Rudolf Agricola Junior, Valentin Eck, and Leonard Cox. Erasmus studies, 16. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2007.
  10. Koryl, Jacub. Erasmianism, Mediterranean Humanism, and Reception History. The Case of Jerzy Liban of Legnica at the University of Cracow (1518–1539). Studi Slavistici x (2013): 43–68. Available at: http://www.fupress.net/index.php/ss/article/view/14134/13137 ( http://dx.doi.org/10.13128/Studi_Slavis-14134) [Discusses Cox on pp.51–53.]

Richard Croke (Crocus) (c 1489–late August 1558)

Editions

See Shaaber C467–C474, USTC,

  1. . . . Achademiae Lipsiensis encomium congratulatorium. Leipzig: Valentin Schumann, 1515. For Digital Copy, see USTC. [USTC 689665; Shaaber C467.]
  2. Tabulae, grecas literas compendio discere cupientibus, sane qua utiles, in quibus hec habentur contenta. De pronunciatione literarum grecarum. Leipzig, in aedibus Valentin Schumann, 1516. For Digital Copy, see USTC. [USTC 673981; Shaaber C470.]
  3. Tabulae, Graecas literas compendio discere cupientibus, sane qua utiles, in quibus haec habentur contenta:· de grecarum literarum pronunciatione. . . Leipzig, in aedibus Valentin Schumann, 1521. [USTC 673980; Shaaber C471.]
  4. Orationes Richardi Croci duae: altera a cura, qua vtilitatem laudemque graecae linguae tractat, altera e tempore, qua hortatus est Cantabrigienses, ne desertores essent eiusdem. Lutaetiae Parisiorum [Paris]: Cura Simonis Colinaei [Simon de Colines] . . . sumptibus vero Damiani Ichman [Damien Higman] . . . 1520. [USTC 181970; Shaaber C469; Worldat OCLC 77322353. For Croke's praises of More and for a summary of the Orationes duae, see Calendar of More's Letters.]
  5. Richar[di] Croci Britta[n]ni i[n] laude[m] libelli. Dungersheim, Hieronymus [Dungersheym von Ochsenfart]. Reprobatio orationis excusatorie picardorum: regie maiestati in Ungaria misse: ad illustrissimum principem d[omi]n[u]m Georgiu[m] Saxoniae ducem [et]c. scripta. . . . Lipsi [Leipzig], Wolfgang Stöckel, 1516. For Digital copy, see USTC. [USTC 690677.]

Works Edited by Richard Croke

  1. Theocritus. Eidyllia triakonta. Paris, Gilles de Gourmont, [1512]. [USTC 183265.]
  2. Manuzio, Aldo. Habetis adulescentes studiosi Aldinam Grammaticam. Paris, Nicolas des Prez: François Regnault, [1513]. [USTC 209089.]
  3. Manuzio, Aldo. Habetis adulescentes studiosi Aldinam Grammaticam. Paris, Nicolas des Prez: Jean Petit, [1513]. [USTC 183341.]
  4. Ausonius, Decimus Magnus Opera diligenter castigata et in pulcherrimum ordinem e pristina confusione restituta. Leipzig, Valentin Schumann, 1515. For Digital Copy, see USTC. [USTC 614841; Shaaber C473.]
  5. Ausonius, Decimus Magnus. Decii ausonii magni ecloga in qua cupido cruciatur scholiis ex ore prelegentis Alexandri obiter exceptis. Pulchre illustrata. Leipzig, Martin Landsberg, 1516. [USTC 631967; Shaaber C472.]
  6. Theodorus Gaza. Theodori . . . Liber quartus et ultimus de constructione. R. Croco Britanno interpraete. Leipzig, in aedibus Valentin Schumann, 1516. For Digital Copy, see USTC. [USTC 696680; Shaaber C474. Croke's Latin translation of Book IV of Theodore of Gaza's Greek Grammar.]
  7. Theodorus Gaza. Liber quartus et ultim[us] de co[n]structione. Leipzig, in aedibus Valentin Schumann, 1516. For Digital Copy, see USTC. [USTC 696679; Shaaber C475 (variant).]
  8. Theodorus Gaza. Liber quartus et ultimus de constructione. Coloniae [Köln], apud Henricum Novesiensem [Heinrich von Neuß], 1521. [USTC 696646; Shaaber C476.]

Studies, etc.

For brief biographies of Richard Croke, see Allen #227/25, n. on pp.467–68, and intro. to Rogers #81, pp.162–63.

  1. Letter from Thomas More to Richard Croke, [Fall?] [1519?]. See Calendar of More's Letters.
  2. Mullinger, J. B. The History of Cambridge from the Earliest Times to the Royal Injunctures of 1535. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1873. rpt. 2009. 529–39. Online at https://archive.org/details/universityofcamb00mulliala [Summary paraphrase of Croke's Orationes duae.]
  3. Hager, H. Richard Croke. Transactions of the Cambridge Philological Society 2 (1883): 83–94.
  4. McConica, J. K. English Humanists and Reformation Politics. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1965. 80,91,113,216 and 297.
  5. CFG & PGB. Richard Croke of London, c 1489–late August 1558. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 1: 359–360.
  6. Woolfson, Jonathan. Croke, Richard (1489–1558). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Jan. 2008] ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/6734)

Croyland (Crowland) Chronicle, Second Continuation (1486)

Editions and Translations

  1. Fulman, William, ed. Historiae Croylandensis Continuatio in Rerum Anglicarum Scriptorum Veterum. Oxford: E Theatro Sheldoniano, 1684. I: 549–92.
  2. Riley H. T., trans. The Second Continuation of the Croyland Chronicle. Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland. London: Henry G. Bohn, 1854. 453–510. [English translation.]
  3. Pronay, N., and J. Cox, eds. The Crowland Chronicle Continuations: 1459–1486. London: Alan Sutton Publishing for Richard III and Yorkist History Trust, 1986. 108–207. [Latin Text and English Translation.]
    Review:
    1. Richard G. Davies, English Historical Review 105 (1990): 166–167.

Extracts

  1. Littleton, Taylor, and Robert R. Rea, eds. From The Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland. To Prove a Villain: The Case of King Richard III. New York: MacMillan Co., 1964. 90–95. [An extract from Riley's translation.]

Studies

  1. Edwards, J. G. The Second Continuation of the Crowland Chronicle: Was it Written in Ten Days? Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 39 (1966): 117–29. [Criticises the conventional account (Kingsford) of the composition and authorship of the Second Continuation. Suggests that ten days refers to the settlement of certain legal matters, not authorship.]
  2. Hanham, A. The Second Continuation of the Crowland Chronicle: A Monastic Mystery. and Excursus: The Usurpation in Vergil and the Crowland Chronicle. in Richard III and His Early Historians. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1975. 74–102, 148–51. [Excursus suggests that Polydore Vergil and Crowland drew on a common source.]
  3. Gransden, A. The Crowland Chronicle. Historical Writing in England ii, c. 1307 to the Early Sixteenth Century. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982. 265–74, 408–12, 490–92.
  4. Kelly, Henry Ansgar. The Last Chroniclers of Croyland. The Ricardian 7.91 (December 1985): 142–177.
  5. Pronay, N., and J. Cox. Introduction. The Crowland Chronicle Continuations: 1459–1486. Ed. N. Pronay and J. Cox. London: Alan Sutton Publishing for Richard III and Yorkist History Trust, 1986. 1–105.
    Review:
    1. Richard G. Davies, English Historical Review 105 (1990): 166–167.
  6. Kelly, Henry Ansgar. The Croyland Chronicle Tragedies. The Ricardian 7.99 (December 1987): 498–515.
  7. Williams, D. The Crowland Chronicle, 616–1500. England in the Fifteenth Century: Proceedings of the 1986 Harlaxton Symposium. Ed. D. Williams. Woodbridge, Suff.: Boydell & Brewer, 1987. 371–90. [Argues for the unity of the Crowland Chronicle Continuations. Suggests Piers Curtis as possible author of the Yorkist memoir incorporated into the Second Continuation.]
  8. Kelly, Henry Ansgar. Croyland Observations. The Ricardian 8.108 (March 1990): 334–341.

Roger Edgeworth (d. 1560)

Editions

  1. Edgeworth, Roger. Sermons very fruitfull, godly, and learned, preached and sette foorth by Maister Roger Edgeworth, doctoure of diuinitie, canon of the cathedrall churches of Sarisburie, Welles and Bristow, residentiary in the cathedrall churche of Welles, and chauncellour of the same churche: with a repertorie or table, directinge to many notable matters expressed in the same sermons. Excusum Londini: in aedibus Roberti Caly, Tipographi, Mense Septemb. Anno. 1557. Available online through EEBO/TCP (A21119) at http://tei.it.ox.ac.uk/tcp/Texts-HTML/free/A21/A21119.html [STC 7482; ESTC S111773.]
  2. Wilson, J. M. An edition of Roger Edgeworth's Sermons very fruitfull, godly and learned (from the edition of 1557 and Bodl. MS Rawl. D. 831). Ph.D. Diss. University of Oxford, 1985.
  3. Wilson, J., ed. Sermons very Fruitfull, godly and learned by Roger Edgeworth: Preaching in the Reformation, c.1535–c.1553. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1993.
    Review:
    1. G. I. McGuiness, Moreana 121 (1995): 73–76.

Studies

See ODNB for Bibliography.

  1. Blench, J. W. John Longland and Roger Edgeworth: Two Forgotten Preachers of the Early Sixteenth Century. See John Longland.
  2. Wilson, Janet M. Edgeworth, Roger (c.1488–1559/60). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [Jan 2008]. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/8479)

Edward IV (28 April 1442–9 April 1483)

  1. Ross, Charles. Edward IV. London: Eyre Methuen; Berkeley: U of California P, 1974. Rpt. Yale English Monarchs Series. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998.
  2. Hammond, P. W. The Battles of Barnet and Tewkesbury. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1990.
    Review:
    1. R. W. Fritze, Sixteenth Century Journal 22 (1991): 795–96.
  3. Horrox, Rosemary. Edward IV (1442–1483). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Sept. 2011] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/8520) [Include bibliography. 10000 words.]
  4. James, Jeffrey. Edward IV: Glorious Son of York. Stroud: Gloucestershire: Amberley Publishing, 2015.
  5. Pollard, A. J. Edward IV: The Summer King. Penguin Monarchs. London: Penguin, 2016.

See also Elizabeth Woodville, and Richard III.

Add ODNB. Add Edward V?

Elizabeth of York, Queen (d.11 February 1503)

  1. Thomas More. A Rufull Lamentation of Queen Elizabeth of York, wife of Henry VII, died 11 February 1502/1503. English Poems. CW 1:xxi–26, 8–13
  2. Harvey, Nancy Lenz. Elizabeth of York: Tudor Queen. Littlehampton, Sussex: Littlehampton Book Services, 1973.
  3. C.F.G. Elizabeth of York queen of England, 1 February 1465–11 February 1503. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 1: 437–438. [ODNB gives her birth date as 11 February 1466.]
  4. Horrox, Rosemary. Elizabeth [Elizabeth of York] (1466–1503), queen of England, consort of Henry VII. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/8635) [Includes bibliography.]
  5. Johnson. Jacqueline. Elizabeth of York: Mother of the Tudor Dynsty. The Rituals and Rhetoric of Queenship: Medieval to Early Modern. Ed. Elizabeth Oakley-Brown, and Louise J. Wilkinson, Dublin: Four Courts P, 2009. 47–58. [Includes Bibliography.]
  6. Okerlund, Arlene Naylor. Elizabeth of York. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.
  7. Licence, Amy. Elizabeth of York, the Lost Tudor Queen. Stroud, Gloustershire: Amberley Publishing, 2013.
  8. Alison Weir. Elizabeth of York: The First Tudor Queen. London: Jonathan Cape, Dec. 9 2013. Pbk. London: Vintage Books, Sept. 9 2014.

For popular treatments of Elizabeth of York in theatre, television, film, and fiction, see Wikipedia.

Thomas Elyot (1490?–1546)

Not Revised Yet: Check ELR for Recent Studies

The Book of the Governor
Of the Knowledge which Maketh a Wise Man
Pasquil the Playne
The Bankette of Sapience
The Castel of Helthe
The Defence of Good Women
Elyot's Letters
Elyot's Translations
General Studies

The Book of the Governor

Editions
  1. Croft, Henry Herbert Stephen, ed. The Boke named the Governour By Sir Thomas Elyot, Knight. 2 vols. London: Kegan Paul, 1880; rpt. London: Kegan Paul, Trench and Co., 1883; rpt. New York, B. Franklin, 1967. 1883 Online at https://archive.org/details/bokenamedgouerno01elyouoft and https://archive.org/details/bokenamedgouerno02elyouoft. [Sullivan 1:229. Edited from the first edition of 1531.]
  2. Watson, F. The Boke named The Governour, devised by Sir Thomas Elyot, Knight. (Everyman's Library) London: Dent, 1907. [Old-spelling edition, rpt. of Croft's edition.]
  3. Studniczka, H., trans. Das Buch vom Führer. Leipzig: ***, 1931.
  4. Lehmberg, Stanford E., ed. The Book Named The Governor. Everyman's Library 227. London: Dent; New York: Dutton, 1963.*** [Modernized edition. 1962 or 1963.]
  5. Sir Thomas Elyot. The Boke Named the Governour. Edited by Ben Ross Schneider, Jr. (Renascence Editions, 1998). https://scholarsbank.uoregon.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1794/681/governour.pdf?sequence=1 [Transcribed from the Dutton/Dent Edition.]
Selections
  1. Nugent, E. M., ed. Sir Thomas Elyot. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 90–97, 152–55, 293–97. [Extracts from The Governor, Elyot's Dictionary, and The Castle of Health.]
  2. Trapp, J. B., ed. Sir Thomas Elyot: The Book Named the Governor. The Middle Ages through the Eighteenth Century. Vol. 1 of The Oxford Anthology of English Literature. Ed. J. Hollander and F. Kermode. 2 vols. London: Oxford UP, 1973. 578–583.
Studies
  1. Woodward, W. H. Thomas Elyot and The Boke named the Governour (1931). Studies in Education During the Age of the Renaissance, 1400–1600. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1906. Rpt. New York: Russell & Russell, 1965. 268–94.
  2. Goode, C. T. Sir Thomas Elyot's Titus and Gysippus. Modern Language Notes 37 (1922): 1–11.
  3. Starnes, D. T. Notes on Elyot's The Governour (1531). Review of English Studies 3 (1927): 37–46.
  4. Starnes, D. T. Shakespeare and Elyot's Governour. University of Texas Studies in English 7 (1927): 112–32.
  5. Hogrefe, Pearl. Elyot and The Boke Called Cortegiano in Ytalion. Modern Philology 27 (1929/30): 303–311.
  6. Schottler, J. Thomas Elyots Governour in seinem Verhaltnis zu Francesco Patrici. Druck: ***, 1938.
  7. Sargent, R. M. Sir Thomas Elyot and the Integrity of The Two Gentleman of Verona. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 65 (1950): 1166–80.
  8. Warren, L. Patrizi's De regno et regis institutione and the Plan of Elyot's The Boke Named the Governour. Journal of English and Germanic Philology 49 (1950): 67–77.
  9. Bühler, C. F. Diogenes and The Boke Named the Governour. Modern Language Notes 69 (1954): 481–84.
  10. Major, John M. The Moralization of the Dance in Elyot's Governour. Studies in the Renaissance 5 (1958): 27–36.
  11. Holmes, E. The Significance of Elyot's Revision of the Gouernour. Review of English Studies ns 12 (1961): 352–63.
  12. Brooks, H. F. Shakespeare and The Gouernour, Bk. II, ch. xiii. Parallels with Richard II and the More Addition. [1963] See More: The Booke of Sir Thomas More.
  13. Hogrefe, Pearl. Sir Thomas Elyot's Intention in the Opening Chapters of the Governour. Studies in Philology 60 (1963): 133–40.
  14. Macdonald, M. J. Elyot's The Boke Named the Governour and the Vernacular. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Lovaniensis: Proceedings of the First International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies, Louvain 23–28 August 1971. Ed. Josef IJsewijn and E. Keßler. Humanistische Bibliothek. Reihe I: Abhandlungen: 20. München: W. Fink; Leuven/Louvain: Leuven UP, 1973. 365–69.
  15. Baker, David. To Divulgate or Set Forth: Humanism and Heresy in Sir Thomas Elyot's The Book Named The Governor. [1993] See More and Elyot.
  16. Howard, Skiles. Ascending the Riche Mount: Performing Hierarchy and Gender in the Henrician Masque. Rethinking the Henrician Era: Essays on Early Tudor Texts and Contexts. Ed. Peter C. Herman. Urbana, IL: U of Illinois P, 1994. 16–39. [Sum.: p.7.]

Of the Knowledge which Maketh a Wise Man

Editions
  1. Howard, Edwin Johnston, ed. Of the Knowledge which Maketh a Wise Man. By Sir Thomas Elyot. Oxford, Ohio: Anchor Press, 1946. [Sullivan 1:314 and 2:130–31. Howard suggests (cf. pp.xxviii–xxxi) the two speakers of the Dialogue, Dionysus and Plato, may represent Henry VIII and Thomas More respectively.]
  2. Creeth, E., ed. Of the Knowledge which Maketh a Wise Man. By Sir Thomas Elyot. Tudor Prose, 1513–1570. Garden City, NY: Anchor Books, 1969. 177–274, 485–87.
Studies
  1. Schroeder, K., ed. Platonismus in der englischen Renaissance vor und bei Thomas Eliot, nebst neudruck von Eliot's Disputacion Platonike, 1533. (Palaestra, 83) Berlin: ***, 1920.
  2. Wilson, K. J. Plato and Elyot: Knowledge as Action. Incomplete Fictions: The Formation of English Renaissance Dialogue. Washington, DC: Catholic U of America P, 1985. 75–107. [An analysis of Of the Knowledge Which Maketh a Wise Man.]

Pasquil the Playne and The Banquest of Sapience

  1. Elyot, Thomas. Pasquil the Playne. London: ***, 1533. [STC 7672.]
  2. Elyot, Thomas. The Bankette of Sapience. Four Political Treatises by Sir Thomas Elyot. Ed. L. Gottesman. Gainsville, FL: ***, 1967. [Find out what the other three are.***]

The Castel of Helthe

Editions

  1. Elyot, Thomas. The Castel of Helth. London: ***, 1539. [STC 7644.]
  2. Tannenbaum, S. A., ed. The Castel of Helthe. By Sir Thomas Elyot. New York: ***, 1937.
  3. The Castel of Helth. By Thomas Elyot. New York: Scholars Press Facsimiles, 1937(?).

Studies

  1. Fulton, J. F. Early Medical Humanists, Leonicenus, Linacre, Thomas Elyot. New England Journal of Medicine 205 (1934): 141–6, 158–9.

The Defence of Good Women

Editions
  1. Elyot, Thomas. In Defence of Good Women. London: ***, 1540.
  2. Watson, F., ed. The Defence of Good Women. Vives and the Renascence Education of Women. London: Edward Arnold; New York: Longmans, Green and Co., 1912. 211–39.
  3. Howard, E. J., ed. Sir Thomas Elyot's The Defence of Good Women. Oxford, Ohio: ***, 1940.
  4. Rohwer-Happe, Gislind. Umzuverlässiges Erzählen im englischen polemischen Dialog: Thomas Elyots The Defence of Good Women (1540). Polemik im Dialog de Reniassance-Humanismus: Formen, Entwicklungen und Funktionen. Ed. Uwe Baumann, Arnold Becker, Marc Laureys. Super alta perennis, Studien zur Wirkung der Klassischen Antike 19. Göttingen: V&R unipress; Bonn University Press, 2015. 155–169.
Studies
  1. Jordon, C. Feminism and the Humanists: The Case of Sir Thomas Elyot's Defence of Good Women. Renaissance Quarterly 36 (1983): 181–201. Rev. vers. in Rewriting the Renaissance: The Discourses of Sexual Difference in Early Modern Europe. Ed. M. W. Ferguson, M. Quiligan, N. J. Wickers. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1986. 242–58.
    Review:
    1. A. Maclean, Moreana 94 (1987): 58–59.
  2. Benson, P. J. Virtue and Politics in Sir Thomas Elyot's The Defence of Good Women. The Invention of the Renaissance Woman: The Challenge of Female Independence in the Literature and Thought of Italy and England. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State UP, 1992. 183–203. [Sum.: C. Adamowicz, Moreana 115/116 (1993): 143.]
  3. Walker, Greg. Sir Thomas Elyot and the Politics of Accomodation: The Defence of Good Women. Persuasive Fictions and Political Culture in the Reign of Henry VIII. Aldershot, UK: Scolar P, 1996. 178–203.
  4. Almási, Zsolt. Be ye not of that sect of Philosophers called Pirhonici?: Caninius and Pyrrhonian Scepticism in Thomas Elyot's The Defence of Good Women. New Perspectives on Tudor Cultures. Ed. by Mike Pincombe and Zsolt Almási. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012. 20–34.

Elyot's Letters

Editions
  1. Wilson, K. J., ed. The Letters of Sir Thomas Elyot. Studies in Philology 73, no. 5: Texts and Studies 1976. (Chapell Hill, NC: U of North Carolina P, 1976.)
    Review:
    1. M. J. Tucker, Renaissance Quarterly 33 (1980): 462–63.

Elyot's Translations (Certain and Probable)

Editions
  1. Pepper, R. D., intro. Four Tudor Books on Education: Sir Thomas Elyot, tr., The Education or Bringing Vp of Children (1533), Francis Clement The Petie Schole with an English Orthographie (1587), Dudley Fenner, The Artes of Logike and Rethorike (1584), William Kempe, The Education of Children in Learning (1588). Gainesville, FL: Scholars' Facsimiles & Reprints, 1966. 1–48. [Reprints S.T.C. 20057 from the Huntington Library copy. Elyot translated from Guarino Veronese's Latin translation of Plutarch's De educandis liberis.]
  2. The Education or bringinge up of children. Trans. Syr T. Eliot. London: T. Berthelet, 1532? Rpt. (The English Experience 184) Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1969. [Reprints STC 20057.]

Studies

  1. Wortham, J. Sir Thomas Elyot and the Translation of Prose. Huntington Library Quarterly 3 (1948): 219–40.

General Studies

  1. Stenberg, T. Sir Thomas Elyot and the Ars Poetica. Notes & Queries 151 (1926): 259.
  2. Kelso, Ruth. The Doctrine of the English Gentleman in the Sixteenth Century: With a Bibliographical List of Treatises on the Gentleman and Related Subjects Published in Europe to 1625. University of Illinois studies in language and literature, 14. Urbana, IL: U of Illinois P, 1929. ***–***.
  3. Pollard, A. F. Sir Thomas More and Sir Thomas Elyot. [1930] See More Biographers: William Roper.
  4. McCoy, S. J. The Language and Linguistic Interests of Sir Thomas Elyot. Diss. U. of North Carolina, 1933.
  5. Starnes, D. T. Sir Thomas Elyot and the Sayings of the Philosophers. University of Texas Studies in English 13 (1933): 5–35.
  6. Pace, G. B. Sir Thomas Elyot against Poetry. Modern Language Notes 56:8 (1941): 597–99.
  7. Howard, E. J. Sir Thomas Elyot on the Turning of the Earth. Philological Quarterly 21 (1942): 441–43.
  8. Donner, H. W. The Emperor and Sir Thomas Elyot. [1951] See More Biographers: William Roper. [On Roper's Life and Elyot's Platonic Dialogue.]
  9. Lescelles, M. Sir Thomas Elyot and the Legend of Alexander Severus. Review of English Studies ns 2 (1951): 305–18.
  10. Caspari, Fritz. Sir Thomas Elyot. Humanism and the Social Order in Tudor England. New York: Teachers College P, 1954. 145–209. [cf. Sullivan 1:173.]
  11. Lewis, C. S. English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, excluding Drama. Oxford History of English Literature, Vol. 3. London: Oxford UP, 1954. 1973. 273–76.
  12. Lehmberg, Stanford E. Sir Thomas Elyot and the English Reformation. Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte 48 (1957): 91–110.
  13. Starnes, D. T. Sir Thomas Elyot Redivivus. University of Texas Studies in English 36 (1957): 28–40.
  14. Bouck, C. W. On the Identity of Papyrius Geminus Eleates. Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society 2 (1958): 252–58.
  15. Lehmberg, Stanford E. Sir Thomas Elyot, Tudor Humanist. Austin, TX: U of Texas P, 1960.
    Review:
    1. R. S. Sylvester, Renaissance News 178–81.
  16. Lehmberg, Stanford E. English Humanists, the Reformation, and the Problem of Counsel. [1961] See Utopia: Utopia Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, and Reform.
  17. Major, John H. Sir Thomas Elyot and Renaissance Humanism. Lincoln, NE: U of Nebraska P, 1964.
    Reviews:
    1. J. P. Cooper, Renaissance News 18 (1965): 133–35.
    2. G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 9 (1966): 52–56.
  18. Hogrefe, Pearl. The Life and the Times of Sir Thomas Elyot, Englishman. Ames, IA: Iowa UP, 1967.
    Review:
    1. N.-M. Egretier, Moreana 17 (1968): 57–60.
  19. Partee, M. H. Sir Thomas Elyot on Plato's Aesthetics. Viator 1 (1970): 327–335.
  20. Dees, J. S. Recent Studies in Elyot. English Literary Renaissance 6 (1976): 336–44.
  21. Beal, P., ed. Thomas Elyot. Index of English Literary Manuscripts. Vol. I: 1450–1625. 5 vols. London: Mansell; New York: R. R. Bowker, 1980. 1/2: 69.
  22. Mueller, Janel M. Towards a Generalized Scripturalism: The Precedent of Elyot. The Native Tongue and the Word: Developments in English Prose Style 1380–1580. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1984. 253–278.
  23. Fox, A. Sir Thomas Elyot and the Humanist Dilemma. Reassessing the Henrician Age: Humanism, Politics, and Reform 1500–1550. By A. Fox and John Guy. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986. 52–73 [For further discussion of Thomas Elyot, see the index in Reassessing the Henrician Age ].
  24. Wilson, K. J. Usque ad aras: Thomas Elyot's Friendship with Thomas More. [1986] See More: More and Elyot.
  25. Conrad, F. W. A Preservative Against Tyranny: Sir Thomas Elyot and the Rhetoric of Counsel. Reformation, Humanism, and Revolution. Vol. 1 of Proceedings of the Folger Institute Center for the History of British Political Thought. Ed. Gordon J. Schochet. 6 vols. Washington, DC: Folger Institute, Folger Shakespeare Library: 1990. I: 191–206.
  26. Baumann, Uwe. Übersetzungstheorie und Übersetzungspraxis im englischen Frühhumanismus: Sir Thomas More und Sir Thomas Elyot. [1995] See More and Elyot.
  27. Walker, Greg. Writing Under Tyranny: English Literature and the Henrician Reformation. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2005. ***–***.
  28. Lehmberg, Stanford. Elyot, Sir Thomas (c.1490–1546). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [Jan. 2008] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/8782) [Includes bibliography.]

Add ODNB not in CE.

Erasmus and England

These items, culled from an unpublished bibliography of Erasmus, are not meant to be comprehensive, but rather to focus on Erasmus's relationships with Catholic Humanists in England, especially More, Fisher and Colet. For possible Erasmian influences on early English Protestants, see the forthcoming bibliography of the English Reformation to 1540.

Erasmus' Correspondence

  1. Thomson, D. F. S., trans. Erasmus and Cambridge: The Cambridge Letters of Erasmus. Intro. and notes by H. C. Porter. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1963. English translation of Erasmus' Cambridge letters.]
    Review(s):
    1. W. K. Ferguson, Renaissance News 17 (1964): 320–21.
    2. J.-C. Margolin, Moreana 3 (1964): 60–65.
    3. E. F. Rice, Jr. American Historical Review 69 (1964): 1122.
  2. Rouschausse, J. Erasmus and Fisher, Their Correspondence, 1511–1524. [1968] See Fisher: Fisher and Erasmus.
  3. Marc'hadour, G., and R. Galibois, trans. Érasme et Thomas More: Correspondance. [1985] See Thomas More's Correspondence.

English Translation of Erasmus' Enchiridion

Editions

  1. Erasmus, Desiderius. A booke called in latyn Enchiridion and in englysshe the manuell of the christen knyght. London: Wynkyn de Worde for J. Byddell, 1533. Facsimile Rpt. The English Experience 156. Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1969. Available online through EEBO at http://tei.it.ox.ac.uk/tcp/Texts-HTML/free/A00/A00363.html [STC 10479; ESTC ***. the first English translation Erasmus' Enchiridion, formerly attributed to William Tyndale. 1545 (A00374) and 1561 (A01988) editions also available online through EEBO.]
  2. O'Donnell, Anne M., ed. Erasmus: Enchiridion Militis Christiani: An English Version. Early English Text Society, 282. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1981. [An edition of the 1533/34 English translation, based on the 1534 edition. O'Donnell finds no conclusive evidence to prove that Tyndale was the translator.]

Studies

  1. Gee, John A. Tindale and the 1533 English Enchiridion of Erasmus. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 49 (1934): 460–71.
  2. Gee, John A. John Bedyll and the first Publication of Erasmus' Enchiridion in English. English Literary History 4 (1937): 43–59.
  3. Mozley, J. F. The English Enchiridion of Erasmus, 1533. Review of English Studies 20 (1944): 97–107.
  4. Parker, Douglas H. J. F. Mozley's The English Enchiridion of Erasmus, 1533: Some Qualifications. Notes and Queries ns 18 (1971): 210–13.
  5. Parker, Douglas H. The English Enchiridion militis christiani and Reformation Politics. Erasmus in English 5 (1972): 15–21.
  6. Parker, Douglas H. Religious Polemics and Two Sixteenth Century English Editions of Erasmus's Enchiridion Militis Christiani, 1543–1561. Renaissance and Reformation 9 (1973): 94–107.
  7. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. Rev. of Erasmus: Enchiridion Militis Christiani: An English Version. Erasmus of Rotterdam Society Yearbook 3 (1983): 146–55. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 333–343.

General Studies

  1. Seebohm, F. The Oxford Reformers. [1867] More: Modern Biographies (1800–1914).
  2. Savage, H. J. The First Visit of Erasmus to England. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 37 (1922): 94–112.
  3. Thompson, J. A. K. Erasmus in England. [1932] More and Erasmus.
  4. Hyma, Albert. Erasmus and the Oxford Reformers (1493–1503). Nederlandsch Archief vor Kerkgeschiedenis ns 25 (1932): 69–92, 97–134. Rpt. (omits appendix 129–34) in Albert Hyma, Renaissance to Reformation. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 1951. 209–49. [A detailed account of Erasmus' intellectual development between 1493 and 1503. Hyma argues against strong influence of Colet on Erasmus' thinking. Includes text of De ratione studii as appendix (129–34).]
  5. Erasmus in Praise of England: The Journalism of Scholarship. TLS 11 Jul. 1936: 569–70, 600, 648.
  6. Exner, H. Die Einfluss von Erasmus auf die Englische Bildungsidee. Berlin: Jünker & Dünnhaupt, 1939.
  7. Campbell, W. E. Erasmus in England. Dublin Review 211 (1942): 36–49. [Sullivan 1:160–61. On Erasmus friendships with Colet, More and Fisher.]
  8. Phillips, Margaret Mann. Erasmus and Propaganda: A Study of the Translations of Erasmus in English and French. Modern Language Review 37 (1942): 1–17.
  9. Cowell, H. J. Erasmus and His English Friends. Essays by Divers Hands 20 (1943): 16–28.
  10. Garrod, H. W. Erasmus and his English Patrons. The Library 5:4 (1949): 1–13.
  11. Krodel, G. G. Luther, Erasmus and Henry VIII. Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte 53 (1962): 60–78. [On Henry's Assertio and Erasmus' attitudes towards Luther between 1519 and 1521.]
  12. Trapp, J. B. Erasmus on William Grocyn and Ps.-Dionysius: A Reexamination. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 59 (1962): 294–303. Rpt. in J. B. Trapp. Studies of Petrarch and his Influence. London: Pindar P, 2003. 477–94.
  13. Devereux, E. J. Some Lost English Translations of Erasmus. The Library 5th ser. 17 (1962): 255–59.
  14. Devereux, E. J. English Translators of Erasmus, 1522–1557. Editing Sixteenth Century Texts: Papers Given at the Editorial Conference, October, 1965. Ed. R. J. Schoeck. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1966. 43–58. [Summ.: Geritz V008.]
    Review(s):
    1. J. A. B. Somerset, Moreana 14 (1967): 32–34.
  15. McConica, James Kelsey. English Humanists and Reformation Politics Under Henry VIII and Edward VI. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1965. Passim.
  16. Devereux, E. J. A Checklist of English Translations of Erasmus to 1700. Occasional Publication 3. Oxford: Oxford Bibliographical Society, 1968.
    Review(s):
    1. R. R. Allen, The Library 5th ser. 25 (1970): 164–66
    2. D. Crane Notes and Queries ns 17 (1970): 228.
  17. Nauwelarts, M. A. Erasme à Louvain: Ephémérides d'un séjour de 1517 à 1521. Scrinium Erasmianum (Mélanges historiques publiés sous le patronage de l'Université de Louvain à l'occasion du Ve Centenaire de la naissance d'Érasme). Ed. J. Coppens. 2 vols. Leiden: Brill, 1969. I: 3–24. [Check this out to see if it sheds any light on More's embassies during this period.]
  18. Thompson, Craig R. Erasmus and Tudor England. Actes du Congrès Érasme: organisé par la Municipalité de Rotterdam sou les auspices de l'Academies Royale Néerlandaise des Sciences et Sciences Humaines. Rotterdam 27–29 octobre 1969. Amsterdam-London: North-Holland Publishing Co., 1971. 29–68. [McCutcheon: a magisterial account of what has been discovered and what remains to be done.]
  19. Kaufman P. I. John Colet and Erasmus' Enchiridion. Church History 46 (1977): 296–312.
  20. Pollet, M. Érasme en Angleterre. Colloquia Erasmiana Turonensia. Douzième Stage International d'Études Humanistes (Tours 1969). Ed. J. C. Margolin. De Pétrarque à Descartes 24. 2 vols. Paris: J. Vrin; Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1972. I: 161–174.
  21. Mallinson, V. Érasme d'Angleterre et sa révolution pédagogique. Révue générale Jan. 1975: 41–57.
  22. Rose, P. L. Erasmians and Mathematicians at Cambridge in the Early Sixteenth Century. Sixteenth Century Journal 8:Supp. (1977): 46–59.
  23. Rhodes, J. T. Erasmus and English Readers of the 1530's. Durham University Journal 71 (1978): 17–25.
  24. Clough, Cecil M. Erasmus and the Pursuit of English Royal Patronage in 1517 and 1518. Erasmus of Rotterdam Society Yearbook 1 (1981): 126–40. [On Erasmus' unsuccessful attempts to become Henry VIII's Latin Secretary.]
  25. Devereux, E. J. Renaissance English Translations of Erasmus: A Bibliography to 1700. Erasmus Studies 6. Toronto, U of Toronto P, 1983.
    Review(s):
    1. C. F. Robinson, Notes and Queries ns 32 (1985): 528.
    2. Anne M. O'Donnell, Erasmus of Rotterdam Society Yearbook 5 (1985): 100–04.
    3. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana XXIV:94 (1987): 31–34.
  26. Hibbard, G. R. Erasmus and More in the Age of Shakespeare. [1983] More and Erasmus.
  27. Murphy, C. Erasmus' English Pléiade. [1985] Act conventus Neo-Latini Bononiensis. Proceedings of the Fourth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies: Bologna, 26 August to 1 September 1979. Ed. Richard J. Schoeck. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 37. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1985. 533–38. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/bononactaconvent00inteuoft [On Erasmus' friendships with Colet, Fisher, Grocyn, Mountjoy, Pace, Tunstall and Warham.]
  28. Schoeck, R. J. Erasmus in England, 1499–1517: Translatio Studii and the Studia Humanitatis. Classical and Modern Literature 7 (1987): 269–83.
  29. Aston, M. Erasmus and After. England's Iconoclasts. Vol. 1: Laws Against Images. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1988. 195–210.
  30. Baker-Smith, Dominic. Inglorious Glory: 1513 and the Humanist Attack on Chivalry. [1990] Chivalry in the Renaissance. Ed. S. Anglo. Woodbridge, Suffolk: The Boydell P, 1990. 129–44. [Summ.: G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 114 (1993): 104. On Erasmus' pacifist writings in 1515–1518 as a response to Henry VIII's war with France in 1513. Some comments on Thomas More also.]
  31. Trapp, J. B. Erasmus, Colet and More: The Early Tudor Humanists and their Books. The Panizzi Lectures 1990. London: The British Library, 1991. Some chapters also listed separately.]
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 111/112 (1992): 182–183.
  32. Trapp, J. B. Erasmus and His English Friends. Erasmus of Rotterdam Society Yearbook 12 (1992): 18–44. Rpt. in J. B. Trapp. Studies of Petrarch and his Influence, London: Pindar P, 2003. 434–66.
  33. McConica, James. Erasmus, Desiderius (c.1467–1536). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Jan. 2007] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/39358) [Include bibliography. 6312 Words.]

See also More: More and Erasmus, Fisher and Erasmus, Colet and Erasmus, and Margaret Roper.

Robert Fabyan and Town and City Chronicles

Editions

Add early editions by Pynson 1510, 1533, 1542, and 1559?

  1. Ellis, H., ed. The New Chronicles of England and France: by Robert Fabyan, Named by Himself the Concordance of Histories. Reprinted from Pynson's edition of 1516. The first part collated with the editions of 1533, 1542, and 1559; and the second with a manuscript of the author's own time, as well as the subsequent editions: including the different continuations. To which are added a biographical and literary preface, and an index. London: F. C. and J. Rivington et al., 1811. Online at https://archive.org/details/newchroniclesofe00fabyuoft
  2. Thomas, A. H. Thomas, and I. D. Thornley, eds. The Great Chronicle of London. London: George W. Jones, 1938.

Town and City Chronicles

  1. Flenley, Ralph, ed. Six Town Chronicles of England. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1911. Online at https://archive.org/details/cu31924028061293
  2. Kingsford, Charles Lethbridge, ed. Chronicles of London. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1905. Online at https://archive.org/details/chroniclesoflond00kinguoft
  3. Kingsford, Charles Lethbridge, ed. Two London chronicles from the collections of John Stow. Camden Miscellany 12. London: Camden Society, 1910. Online at https://archive.org/details/twolondonchronic00stowrich

Excerpts

  1. Nugent, E. M., ed. Robert Fabyan. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 480–85. [Extracts from The New Chronicles of England and of France.]
  2. Cartelli, Thomas, ed. Robert Fabyan. From The New Chronicles of England and France (1516). William Shakespeare: Richard III: Authoritative Text, Contexts, Criticism. Norton Critical Edition. New York: W. W. Norton, 2009. 113–116. [Modernized text based on 1559 edition.]

See also http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~jtitus/. Includes pages on Richard III.

Studies

  1. Hanham, A. Miscellaneous Native Chronicles: Facts and Fictions. Richard III and His Early Historians. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1975. 103–17. [On Fabyan, John Rous and other accounts of Richard III.]
  2. Kaufman, P. I. The Eclipse of the Early Tudor Church: André, Fabyan, and Polydore Vergil. [] See Bernard André.
  3. Bean, J. M. W. The Role of Robert Fabyan in Tudor Historiography of the Wars of the Roses. Florilegium Columbianum: Essays in Honor of Paul Oskar Kristeller. Ed. K.-L. Selig and R. Somerville. New York: Italica P, 1987. 167–85. [On the relationship between and authorship of the Great Chronicle and the New Chronicles. On Fabyan's (and Polydore Vergil's) part in reinterpreting Margaret of Anjou's role in the period 1450–1459.]
  4. McLaren, M-R. Fabyan, Robert (d. 1513). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/9054) [Includes bibliography.]
  5. Womersley, David. Fabyan's Chronicle: Reading and Religion Reformed. Divinity and State. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010. (DOI)

John Fowler (1537–13 February 1579)

For Fowler's Controversial Works, see ARCR I:509–520.1 and ARCR II:308–311.

Editions Containing Thomas More's Works

  1. More, Thomas. Doctissima D. Thomae Mori clarissimi ac disertiss. viri Epistola, in qua . . . respondet literis Ioannis Pomerani. Louvanii, ex officina Joannes Foulerus [John Fowler], 1568. See More: Letter to Bugenhagen and Calendar of More's Letters.
  2. More, Thomas. A dialogue of cumfort against tribulation made by . . . Sir Thomas More. Antwerpen, apud Joannes Foulerus [John Fowler], 1573. See More: Dialogue of Comfort.
  3. Fowler, John, ed. A Brief Fourme of Confession. Antwerp: John Fowler, 1576. See More: Final Instructions and Prayers and More: A Treatise to Receive the Blessed Body.

Studies, etc.

  1. Prefatory Letter of John Fowler to Philip II, King of Spain, Louvain, 14 December 1568. Doctissima D. Thomae Mori clarissimi ac disertiss. viri Epistola, in qua . . . respondet literis Ioannis Pomerani. See Calendar of More's Letters.
  2. John Fowler Epistle Dedicatory to the Right Honourable and Excellent Lady [Jane Dormer], the Duchess of Feria her Grace. Louvain, 2nd April 1572. A Brief Fourme of Confession. Antwerp: John Fowler, 1576. sigs. a2–a5 [Gibson 96; CW 13: cxxiii–cxxiv; For the circumstances surrounding the dedicatory letter, written shortly after the death of Jane Dormer's husband, see CW 12:489n2. The Yale editors suggest that there was an earlier edition of 1572, now lost.]
  3. Prefatory Letter of John Fowler to Lady Jane Dormer, Duchess of Feria, Antwerp, 30 September, 1573. A dialogue of cumfort against tribulation . . . See Calendar of More's Letters.
  4. Antheunis, L. Englesche drukkers in de Spaansche Nederlanden: John Fowler (1537–1579). Bijdragen tot de geschiedenis 28 (1937): 114–27.
  5. Schrickx, W. John Fowler, English Printer and Bookseller in the Low Countries (1564–1579). De Gulden Passer 54 (1976): 1–48.
  6. Voss, Paul J. The Making of a Saint: John Fowler and Sir Thomas More in 1573. [2000] See More: Dialogue of Comfort.
  7. Arblaster, Paul. Fowler, John (1537–1579). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/10009)

Richard Fox(e) (1486–1527) Bishop of Winchester, and Founder of Corpus Christi College, Oxford

Editions

  1. The contemplacyon of sinners. Westmynster: Wynken de Worde, 1499. Rpt. (The English Experience 645) Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1974. [Rpt. of STC 5643. Inspired if not written by Richard Fox.]
  2. Ward, G. R. M., ed. and trans. The Foundation Statutes of Bishop Fox for Corpus Christi College now First Translated into English with a Life of the Founder. London: Longmans, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1843.
  3. Batten, Edmund Chisholm, ed. The Register of Richard Fox while Bishop of Bath and Wells, A.D. MCCCXIICII–MCCCCXCIV . . . with a Life of Bishop Fox. London: Privately Printed, 1889. https://archive.org/details/registerofrichar00foxruoft [only 100 copies printed.]
  4. Allen, P. S., and H. M. Allen, eds. The Letters of Richard Fox, 1486–1527. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1929.

Selections

  1. Nugent, E. M., ed. Richard Fox. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 24–35. [Some excerpts from Fox's correspondence and his statutes for Corpus Christi College, Oxford.]
  2. Slavin, Arthur, ed. Bishop Richard Fox: From his Letters and Statutes. Humanism, Reform, and Reformation in England. New York: Wiley, 1969. 27–33. [Excerpts from Fox's correspondence (including Preface to translation of the Rule of Saint Benedict), and his statutes for Corpus Christi College, Oxford.]

Studies

  1. Fowler, Thomas. Foxe or Fox, Richard, 1448?–1528. Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. Leslie Stephen. London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1889. Vol. 20:150–156. Available online at https://archive.org/details/dictionaryofnati20stepuoft
  2. Fowler, Thomas. Richard Foxe, the Founder, Hugh Oldham, William Frost and other Benefactors, The Statutes and the Original Settlement of the College, and Sites and Buildings of the College (including some Account of the Founder's earlier Design for a Monastic College). History of Corpus Christi College: with lists of its members. Oxford Historical Society 25. Oxford : Printed for the Oxford historical society at the Clarendon Press, 1893. 1–78, esp. 1–29. Available online https://archive.org/details/histcorpuschristi00fowluoft
  3. McConica, J. K. English Humanists and Reformation Politics. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1965. 80–84 and passim.
  4. Kendell, Angela J. Thomas More, Richard Fox and the Manor of Temple Guyting in 1515. Moreana 91/92 (1986): 5–10. [Summ.: Geritz F132.]
  5. Trapp, J.B. Richard Foxe. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 2: 46–49.
  6. Davies, C.S.L. Fox [Foxe], Richard (1447/8–1528). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Sept. 2010] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/10051) [Includes extensive bibliography.]
  7. Drees, Clayton J. Bishop Richard Fox of Winchester: Architect of the Tudor Age. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2014.

Stephen Gardiner (c1497–12 November 1555)

Editions

  1. Janelle, Pierre, ed. Stephen Gardiner. Obedience in Church and State: Three Political Tracts. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1930. Rpt. Cambridge UP, 2014. [Contains three political tracts written by Stephen Gardiner in the original Latin with a facing-page English translation: Gardiner's Tract on Fisher's Execution, The Oration of True Obedience and Gardiner's Answer to Bucer.]
  2. Muller, James Arthur, ed. The Letters of Stephen Gardiner. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1933. Rpt. 1970. Reissued 2013.
  3. Donaldson, P. S., ed. A Machiavellian Treatise by Stephen Gardiner. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1975.
    Review(s):
    1. Dermott Fenlon, Historical Journal 19 (1976): 1019–23.

Selections

  1. Nugent, E. M., ed. Stephen Gardiner. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 98–106. [Two letters from Muller's edition.]

Studies

  1. Mullinger, James Bass. Gardiner, Stephen. Dictionary of National Biography, 1885–1900. VII: 859–65 (20:419–425). Online at https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Gardiner,_Stephen_(DNB00).
  2. Gairdner, James. Warwick, Gardiner and Cranmer. Lollardry and the Reformation. 4 vols. London: MacMillan, 1908–13. Rpt.(Burt Franklin: Research and Source Work Series 84.) New York: Burt Franklin, 1974. 3: 169–245. Available online at https://archive.org/details/lollardyreefengland03gairuoft
  3. Gairdner, James. Stephen Gardiner. Typical English Churchmen, Series 2. From Wyclif to Gardiner. Edited by John Neville Figgis. The Church Historical Society, 78. London: Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge, 1909. 167–90. Online at https://archive.org/details/typicalenglishch00londrich.
  4. Muller, James Arthur. Stephen Gardiner and the Tudor Reaction. London: Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge; New York: Macmillan, 1926. Rpt. New York: Octagon Books, 1970. Full view on HathiTrust. [Sullivan 2:350.]
  5. Pineas, Rainer. George Joye's Polemical Use of History in His Controversy with Stephen Gardiner. Nederlands Archief voor Kerkgeschiedenis ns 55 (1974): 21–31.
  6. Zeeveld, W. G. Apology for an Execution. [1977] See More's Trial: Studies.
  7. Pineas, Rainer. William Turner's Polemical Use of Ecclesiastical History and His Controversy with Stephen Gardiner. Renaissance Quarterly 33 (1980): 599–608.
  8. Weikel A. The Marian Council Revisited. in The Mid-Tudor Polity, c.1540–1560. Ed. J. Loach and R. Tittler. London: MacMillan P, 1980. 52–73, 189–90, 203–04. [On Gardiner's role as Lord Chancellor.]
  9. Donaldson, P. S. Bishop Gardiner, Machiavellian. Historical Journal 23 (1980): 1–16. Machiavelli and Mystery of State. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1988. 36–85. Rev. vers. of intro. to A Machiavellian Treatise of Stephen Gardiner. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1975. [Smeeton #208: The bishop's manual of advice to Philip II reveals the early influence of Machiavellian thought.]
    Review(s):
    1. T. F. Mayer, Sixteenth Century Journal 21 (1990):108–09.
  10. Feingold, Mordechai. Stephen Gardiner (c1497–12 November 1555). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 2: 74–76.
  11. Moreau, J.-P. Politique et theologie chez les catholiques schismatiques anglais (1534–1553). L'Europe de la Renaissance: Cultures et Civilisations. Mélanges offerts à Marie-Thérèse Jones-Davies. Paris: Jean Touzot, 1988. 141–57. [On the influence of Melanchthon's doctrine of adiaphora (indifferent things) on Gardiner, Bonner and Tunstall.]
  12. Redworth, Glyn. In Defence of the Church Catholic: The Life of Stephen Gardiner. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1990.
    Review(s):
    1. P. Airhart, America 14 Sep. 1991: 149.
    2. Leonard R. N. Ashley, Bibliothèque d'Humanisme et Renaissance 54 (1992): 232–33.
    3. W. B. Soule, Thomist 58:1 (1994): 161–64.
  13. Austen, James F. Stephen Gardiner and the Origins of Erastian Catholicism, c.1528–1547. Durham University M. A. Diss., 1992. Online at https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/9347633.pdf
  14. Bates, J. Barrington. Stephen Gardiner's Explication and the Identity of the Church. Anglican and Episcopal History 72:1 (March 2003) 22–54.
  15. Armstrong, C. D. C. Gardiner, Stephen (c.1495x8–1555). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [Jan 2008]. ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/10364) [Include bibliography. 12069 words.]
  16. Werrell, Ralph S. Reformation conflict between Stephen Gardiner and Robert Barnes, Lent 1540. Paul's Cross and the Culture of Persuasion in England, 1520–1640. Edited by W.J.T. Kirby, and P.G. Stanwood. Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2014. 129–140.
  17. Campbell, Ian W.S. The Role of John Fisher's Memory and Philip Melanchthon's Hermeneutics in the Household of Bishop Stephen Gardiner. Recusant History 28:3 () 365–377. (https://doi.org/10.1017/S0034193200011432) [Deals with Bonner, T. Watson, J. White, J. Seton, R. Baynes, J. Redman, G. Day, and J. Christopherson.]

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Gardiner.

George, Duke of Clarence (21 October 1449–18 February 1478)

Add note about More's history.

  1. Lander, J. R. The Treason and Death of the Duke of Clarence: A Re-Interpretation. Canadian Journal of History 2 (1967): 1–28.
  2. Ross, Charles. Edward IV. London: Eyre Methuen; Berkeley: U of California P, 1974. Rpt. Yale English Monarchs Series. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1998. 116–117, passim.
  3. Ross, Charles. Richard III. London: Eyre Methuen; Berkeley: U of California P, 1981. Rpt. Yale English Monarchs. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. 5–7, passim.
  4. Hicks, Michael. False, Fleeting, Perjur'd Clarence: George, Duke of Clarence 1449–78. Bangor: Headstart History, rev. ed. 1992.
  5. Hicks, Michael. George, duke of Clarence (1449–1478). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/10542) [Includes bibliography?]

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Plantagenet,_1st_Duke_of_Clarence.

William Gonell (Gonnell, Gunnell) (d. 1560)

  1. Letter From Thomas More to William Gonell [Gonnell], At Court, 22 May [1518]. See Calendar of More's Letters.
  2. From John Leland's Epigrammata (1589). John Leland, Epigrammata (printed 1589), edited by Dana Sutton, online at http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/lelandpoems/ See LXX on William Gonell. [Sutton dates Leland's Epigram to Gonell (LXX) to 1525.]
  3. CFG & PGB. William Gonnell of Landbeach, d. 28 August 1560. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz, and T. B. Beutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. Vol. 2: 118.
  4. Ryle, S. F. Gonell, William (d. 1560). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Jan. 2008] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/10936)

Richard Grafton (1506/7–1573)

Editions

  1. Ellis, Sir Henry, ed. Grafton's Chronicle, Or History of England: To which is Added His Table of the Bailiffs, Sheriffs and Mayors of the City of London from the Year 1189, to 1558, Inclusive. By Richard Grafton. 2 Volumes. London: 1809. Online at https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=wr4_AAAAcAAJ and https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=_r4_AAAAcAAJ.
  2. Kendall, P. M., ed. The Continuation. By Richard Grafton. Richard III The Great Debate: Sir Thomas More's History of King Richard III and Horace Walpole's Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of King Richard III. New York: Norton, 1965. 112–43. [Actually, a translation from Polydore Vergil.]

Studies

  1. Kingdon, John Abernathy. Incidents in the Lives of Thomas Poyntz and Richard Grafton. London: Privately printed by Rixon and Arnold, 1895.
  2. Kingdon, John Abernathy. Richard Grafton, Citizen and Grocer of London. London: Privately printed by Rixon and Arnold, 1901.
  3. Sisson, C. J. Grafton and the London Grey Friars. The Library 4th ser. 11 (1930): 121–49.
  4. Rosenberg, E. Leicester: Patron of Letters. New York: Columbia UP, 1955. 66–77.
  5. Hamann, Edmund G. The Clarification of Some Obscurities Surrounding the Imprisonment of Richard Grafton in 1541 and in 1543. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 52 (1958): 262–82.
  6. Sylvester, R. S. Richard Grafton and the Manuscript of More's Early English Draft. [1963] See More's Richard III: Textual History and Scholarship.
  7. Levy, F. J. ' [Richard Grafton.] Tudor Historical Thought. San Marino: Huntington Library, 1967. 178–81.
  8. McKisack, M. Medieval History in the Tudor Age. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1971. 111–13.
  9. Kerling, Nellie J. Richard Grafton, Governor of St. Bartholomew's Hospital, London. Humanities Association Review [Kingston, Ontario] 27 (1976): 24–31.
  10. Hanham, Alison. The Two Editions of Grafton's Chronicle of John Hardyng. Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand Bulletin 3 (1979): 17–23.
  11. Devereux, E. J. Empty Tuns and Unfruitful Grafts: Richard Grafton's Historical Publications. Sixteenth Century Journal 21 (1990): 33–56. [Sum.: p. 33. On Grafton's An Abridgement of the Chronicles of England and John Stow's A Summarie of Englyshe Chronicles.]
  12. Kastan, David Scott. Opening Gates and Stopping Hedges: Grafton, Stow, and the Politics of Elizabethan History Writing. The Project of Prose in Early Modern Europe and the New World. Ed. Elizabeth Fowler and Roland Greene. Cambridge, England : Cambridge UP, 1997. 66–79.
  13. Womersley, David. Grafton and Stow: Schism and Antagonism. Divinity and State. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010. (DOI)
  14. Ferguson, Meraud Grant Grafton, Richard (1506/7–1573). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online [Sept. 2015]. (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/11186) [Include bibliography.]

William Grocyn (Grocin) (1446?–1519)

  1. For references to Grocyn in More and Erasmus, see Allen #118, etc.; Rogers #2/14, n. on p.4 and Harpsfield 12/15–16, 13/10–14/7 and nn. on pp.306,307–308.
  2. Gulielmus Grocinus Britannus Aldo Manutio Romano. S. P. D. Ex Vrbe Londino. vi. Calen. Septe[m]br. [London, 27 August 1499]. In Firmicus Maternus, Julius: Mathesis (De nativitatibus libri VIII). Ed: Franciscus Niger. Add: Marcus Manilius: Astronomicorum libri V. Aratus: Phaenomena [Latin and Greek]. Tr & adapt: Germanicus Caesar, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Rufius Festus Avienus. Theon: Commentaria in Aratum [Greek]. Pseudo- Proclus Diadochus [i.e. Geminos]: Sphaera [Greek and Latin]. Tr: Thomas Linacrus. (Venice: Aldus Manutius, Romanus, June and [17] Oct. 1499). fol.370a. see http://www.gesamtkatalogderwiegendrucke.de/docs/GW09981.htm [ISTC No.: if00191000; USTC 760281; Shaaber L301; Univers 103.]
  3. Burrows, Montagu. Linacre’s Catalogue of Grocyn’s Books, Followed by a Memoir of William Grocyn. Collectanea. Second Series. Oxford: Oxford Historical Society at the Clarendon P, 1890. 317–80. Online at https://archive.org/details/collectaneaseco00burrgoog [Sullivan 1:144. Includes Grocyn's Will (378–80).]
  4. Nugent, E. M., ed. William Grocyn. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 12–15. [Translations of Grocyn's only surviving works: a Letter to Aldus Manutius, and William Grocyn's Will.]
  5. Weiss, Roberto. Humanism in England During the Fifteenth Century. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 3rd ed. 1967. 173–74, 200.
  6. McConica, J. K. English Humanists and Reformation Politics. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1965. 49–53 and passim.
  7. CFG & PGB. William Grocyn. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz, and T. B. Beutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. Vol. 2: 135–36.
  8. Trapp, J. B. Grocyn, William (1449?–1519). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [Jan 2008]. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/11650)
  9. Arnold, Jonathan A. The English Erasmians: Thomas Linacre, Thomas Grocyn and Thomas Lupset. The Great Humanists: An Introduction. London:I. B. Tauris. 2011. 189–206, 285–89; esp. 197–99, 203–204, 288.

John Hackett (Hacket) (d. 27 Oct. 1534)

No entries in ODNB or CE. For a biography, see Rogers Hackett xi–xiii; and Rogers, p.406, introduction to #169.

  1. For joint letters to/from More and Hacket, see Rogers #169–#173 (pp.406–21); Herbrüggen #169B–#169F, #172A (pp.63–84) = Rogers Hackett #127–133, pp.274–293.
  2. !--cross-reference to Tunstall?--> Margaret of Austria to certain silversmiths, Brussels, 24 September 1529. Lille MS Chambre des Comptes B.2351, f.409; Rogers Hackett #134, pp.293–94; E. F. Rogers, Margaret of Austria's Gifts to Tunstal, More and Hacket After the Ladies' Peace, Moreana 12 (1966): 57–60. [The gifts to Tunstal, More and Hackett were in reward for the services at the Peace of Ladies.]
  3. Rogers, E. F., ed. The Letters of Sir John Hackett, 1526–1534. Archives of British History and Culture 1–2. 2 vols. Morgantown, VA: U of West Virginia P (The Conference on British Studies at West Virginia University), 1971. #127–#134, pp.274–294.
    Review:
    1. G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 36 (1972): 105–10.

Edward Hall (Halle) (1497–1547)

Editions

  1. Halle, Edward. The Vnion of the two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre & Yorke . . . London: In officina Richardi Graftoni, 1548. [STC 12721 and 12722; ESTC S121062 and S113110. Includes a version of More's History of King Richard III.]
  2. Halle, Edward. The Vnion of the two noble and illustre famelies of Lancastre & Yorke . . . London: Imprynted at London by Rychardi Grafton, 1550. [STC 12723 and 12723a; ESTC S120059 and S122931.]
  3. Ellis, Sir Henry, ed. Hall's Chronicle: Containing the History of England During the Reign of Henry the Fourth, and the Succeeding Monarchs, to the End of the Reign of Henry the Eighth, in which are Particularly Described the Manners and Customs of those Periods. Edited by Henry Ellis. London: Printed for J. Johnson [etc.] 1809. Rpt. New York, AMS Press, 1965. Available online through www.archive.org
  4. Hall, Edward, d. 1547. Henry VIII. With an Introduction by Charles Whibley. The Lives of the Kings. 2 vols. London, T.C. & E.C. Jack, 1904. Both volumes online at https://archive.org/details/henryviii01halluoft and https://archive.org/details/henryviii02halluoft [Sullivan 2:69–70.]

Excerpts

  1. Nugent, E. M., ed. Edward Hall. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 524–34. [Excerpts fom the Third and Fourteenth Years of Henry the VIII.]
  2. Metz, G. H., ed. From the Vnion of the Two Noble and Illustre Famelies of Lancastre and Yorke (1548 edition). Sources of Four Plays Ascribed to Shakespeare: The Reign of King Edward III, Sir Thomas More, The History of Cardenio, The Two Noble Kinsmen. Columbia, MO: U of Missouri P, 1989. 207–17. [Extract from the Ninth Year of Henry the VIII.]
  3. Cartelli, Thomas, ed. Edward Hall. From The Union of the Two Noble and Illustre Families of Lancaster and York (1548). William Shakespeare: Richard III: Authoritative Text, Contexts, Criticism. Norton Critical Edition. New York: W. W. Norton, 2009. 149–167. [Modernized text from The Tragical Doings of King Richard the Third.]

Studies

  1. Pollard, A. F. Edward Hall's Will and Chronicle. Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 9: (1931/32): 171–77.
  2. Pollard, Graham.(?) The Bibliographical History of Hall's Chronicle. Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 10: (1932/33): 12–17.
  3. Begg, Edleen. Shakespeare's Debt to Hall and Holinshed in Richard. [1935] See More's Richard III: Dramatic Structure and Shakespeare.
  4. Zeeveld, Gordon. The Influence of Hall on Shakespeare's English Historical Plays. English Literary History 3 (1936): 317–53
  5. Shield, H. A. Links with Shakespeare, VII. Notes and Queries 195 (1950): 385–86. [On a copy of Hall's Chronicles possibly annotated by Shakespeare.]
  6. Kelly, Henry Ansgar. More's History of Richard III. [1970] See More's Richard III: Dramatic Structure and Shakespeare.
  7. Lewis, C. S. English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, excluding Drama. Oxford History of English Literature, Vol. 3. London: Oxford UP, 1954. 1973. 276–79.
  8. Holmes, M. Edward Hall and His Chronicle. Essays and Studies ns 20 (1967): 15–28.
  9. Kelly, H. A. Edward Hall. Divine Providence in the England of Shakespeare's Histories. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1970. 108–29, 133–37.
  10. Storari, Gilberto. From Elizabeth I to Elizabeth II: Two Popular Views of Thomas More. [1971] See Thomas More: A Man for all Seasons.
  11. May, S. W. Cavendish's Use of Hall's Chronicle. [1975] See George Cavendish.
  12. Candido, Joseph. Thomas More, The Tudor Chroniclers, and Shakepeare's Altered Richard. [1987] See More's Richard III: Dramatic Structure and Shakespeare.
  13. Howard, Skiles. Ascending the Riche Mount: Performing Hierarchy and Gender in the Henrician Masque. [1994] See Thomas Elyot: The Book of the Governor.
  14. Herman, Peter. Henrician Historiography and the Voice of the People: The Cases of More and Hall. [1997] See More's Richard III: Historiography and General Literary Studies.
  15. Herman, Peter C. Hall, Edward (1497–1547). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [Jan. 2012] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/11954) [Includes bibliography.]

See also More Biographers: Edward Hall.

John Harris (c1510–11 November 1579)

No entries in ODNB or CE. For very brief bios. see Gillow 3:141–42; Rogers, SL intro. to #192*, pp.185–86; and Rogers note to #196/314, p.479. See also De Vocht below. For Harris's dates, see Antheunis (1937) below.

  1. Letter From Thomas More to John Harris, Willesdon, [January–April (c.March) 1534]. See Letters of Thomas More (Rogers 192*)>.
  2. De Vocht, Henry, ed. Literae Virorum Eruditorum ad Fransciscum Craneveldium 1522–1528. Humanistica Lovaniensia 1. Louvain: Librairie Universitaire, Uystpruyst, 1928. Introduction to Ep. #115, pp.311–12. See also Rogers n. to #196/314, p.479. [Brief life of John Harris.]
  3. Antheunis, Louis. Note sur John Harris, secrétaire privé du chancelier Thomas Morus (1510(?)–1579). Revue d'histoire ecclésiastique 33:1 (1937): 534–50.
  4. For facsimiles of Harris's copies of Two of More's Letters, (LC #115, #151 = Rogers #135, 138), see Clarence H. Miller, ed. Thomas More's Letters to Frans van Cranevelt, Including Seven Recently Discovered Autographs: Latin Text, English Translation, and Facsimiles of the Originals [1994] See Letters to Franz van Cranevelt.

Lord Hastings (c.1430–1483)

Add note about Hastings' death in More's History.

  1. Dunham, W. H., Jr. Lord Hastings' Indentured Retainers, 1461–1483: The Lawfulness of Livery and Retaining Under the Yorkists and Tudors. Transactions of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences 39 (1955): 1–175.
  2. Hanham, Alison. Richard III, Lord Hastings and the Historians. English Historical Review 87 (1972): 233–248.
  3. Wolffe, B. P. When and Why did Hastings Lose his Head? English Historical Review 89 (1974): 835–844.
  4. Hanham, Alison. Hastings Redivivus. English Historical Review 90 (1975): 821–827.
  5. Hanham, Alison. Excursus: A Note on the Dating of Lord Hastings' Execution. Richard III and his Early Historians, 1483–1485. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1975. 24–29, 68–70, 166–74.
  6. Thomson, J.A.F. Richard III and Lord Hastings: A Problematical Case Reviewed. Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 48:117 (May 1975): 22–30.
  7. Wolffe, B. P. Hastings Reinterred. English Historical Review 91 (1976): 813–824.
  8. Horrox, Rosemary (2004). Hastings, William, first Baron Hastings (c.1430–1483). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/12588) [Includes bibliography.]

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hastings,_1st_Baron_Hastings.

Henry VII (1457–1509)

This section needs to be revised. Add ODNB.

Studies

  1. Busch, Wilhelm. England Under the Tudors: King Henry VII (1485–1509). Trans. Alice M. Todd, with intro. by James Gairdner. New York: A. D. Innes, 1895. Rpt. Burt Franklin Research & Source Works Series 80. New York: Burt Franklin, 1965. Online at https://archive.org/details/englandundertudo01buscuoft. [Sullivan 1:145.]
  2. Gairdner, James. Henry the Seventh. London: MacMillan, 1920. Online at https://archive.org/details/henryseventh00gairuoft. [Sullivan 2:3.]
  3. Williams, C. H. The Rebellion of Humphrey Stafford in 1486. English Historical Review 43 (1928): 181–89.
  4. Conway, Agnes Ethel. Henry VII's Relations with Scotland and Ireland, 1485–1498. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1932, 2013.
  5. Scammell, G. V., and H. L. Rogers. An Elegy on Henry VII. Review of English Studies ns 8 (1957): 167–70. [Once attributed by Dyce (1843) to Skelton. Scammell and Rogers think Stephen Hawes the more likely author.]
  6. Elton, G. R. Henry VII: Rapacity and Remorse. Historical Journal 1 (1958): 21–39; with a reply by J. P. Cooper, Henry VII's Last Years reconsidered. HJ 2 (1959): 103–29; with a further reply Henry VII: a restatement. HJ 4 (1961):1–29. Rpt. in Studies*** 1:44–99.
  7. Anglo, Sydney. The Foundation of the Tudor Dynasty: The Coronation and Marriage of Henry VII. Guildhall Miscellany 2 (1960): 3–11.
  8. Anglo, Sydney. The British History in Early Tudor Propaganda. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 44 (1961): 17–48.
  9. Tucker, M. J. Life at Henry VII's Court. History Today 19 (1969): 325–31.
  10. Chrimes, S. Henry VII. London: Eyre Methuen; Berkeley: University of California Press, 1972. New Edition. Yale English Monarchs Series. New Haven: Yale UP, 1999.
    Review:
    1. G. R. Elton, Historical Journal 16:3 (1973): 627–29.
  11. Wilkie, William E. The Cardinal Protectors of England: Rome and the Tudors Before the Reformation. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1974.
  12. Attreed, L. C. A New Source For Perkin Warbeck's Invasion of 1497. Medieval Studies 48 (1986): 514–21.
  13. Anglo, Sydney. Ill of the Dead. The Posthumous Reputation of Henry VII. Renaissance Studies 1 (1987): 27–47. [On the treatment of Henry VII's avarice and wisdom in later historians, especially Francis Bacon, and of the dethroning of Bacon's account of Henry's reign.]
    Review:
    1. G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 98/99 (1988): 111.
  14. Bennett, Michael. Lambert Simnel and the Battle of Stoke. Stroud, Gloustershire: Sutton Publishing, 1987.
  15. Schoeck, R. J. Henry VII king of England, 1457–21 April 1509. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 2: 177–78.
  16. Cavill, P. R. The English Parliaments of Henry VII, 1485–1504. Oxford Historical Monographs. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2009.
  17. Gunn, Steven. Henry VII's New Men and the Making of Tudor England. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2016.

Add ODNB and bring up to date. See also https://tudorblogger.wordpress.com/henry-vii/

Bacon's History of the Reign of Henry VII

Editions

  1. Spedding, James, ed. The History of Henry VII. Vol. 6 of Works of Francis Bacon. London: Longman and Co., etc.; Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company, 1858. Online at https://archive.org/details/worksfrancisbac03heatgoog
  2. Lumby, J. R., ed. The History of the Reign of King Henry the Seventh. By Francis Bacon. Cambridge: At the University Press, 1880. Online at https://archive.org/details/reignofkinghenry00bacouoft
  3. Levy, F. J., ed. The History of the Reign of King Henry VII. By Francis Bacon. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1972.
  4. Weinberger, Jerry, ed. The History of the Reign of King Henry the Seventh. By Francis Bacon. Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 1996.
  5. Vickers, Brian, ed. The History of the Reign of King Henry VII and Selected Works. By Francis Bacon. Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998.
  6. Sutton, Dana, ed. and trans. Sir Francis Bacon: Historia Regni Henrici Septimi Regis Angliae (printed 1638). A hypertext critical edition by Dana F. Sutton, University of California, Irvine, Oct. 30, 2000; revised May 14, 2005. http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/henry/.

Studies

  1. Schuster, M. F. Philosophy of Life and Prose Style in Thomas More's Richard III and Francis Bacon's Henry VII. [1955] See More: Richard III—Literary and Historical Studies.
  2. Wheeler, Thomas. Bacon's Henry VII as a Machiavellian Prince. Renaissance Papers. Southeastern Renaissance Conference, U of South Caroline P, 1957. 111–117.
  3. White, H. B. The English Solomon: Francis Bacon on Henry VII. Social Research 24 (1957): 457–81.
  4. Berry, Edward I. History and Rhetoric in Bacon's Henry VII. Seventeenth-Century Prose: Modern Essays in Criticism. Ed. by Stanley E. Fish. New York: Oxford UP, 1971. ***–***[295-96].
  5. Clark, S. Bacon's Henry VII: A Case-Study in the Science of Man. History and Theory 13 (1974): 97–118.
  6. Anglo, S. Ill of the Dead. The Posthumous Reputation of Henry VII. [1987] See Henry VII.
  7. Tinkler, John F. The Rhetorical Method of Francis Bacon's History of the Reign of King Henry the VII. History and Theory 26 (1987): 32–52.

Henry VIII (Excluding the English Reformation)

This is a select bibliography dealing mainly with the early years of Henry VIII's reign, excluding the King's Great Matter and the English Reformation. It also includes some general Historical Studies. There will be a separate bibliography on Henry VIII included in the Bibliography of the English Reformation to 1540.

  1. Rutland Papers: Original Documents Illustrative of the Courts and Times of Henry VII. and Henry VIII. Edited by William Jerdan. Camden Society 21. London: Printed for the Camden Society by J. B. Nichols and Son, 1842. Online at https://archive.org/details/rutlandpapersor02jerdgoog [Sullivan 2:164. Deals with the Field of Cloth of Gold (28–49), the subsequent meeting between Henry VIII and Charles V at Gravelines in 1520 (50–59), and Charles V's visit to England in 1522 (59–100). More is mentioned on pp.28, 33, T124 and 57 (and p.95).]
  2. Pollard, A.F. Henry VIII. London, Paris and New York: Goupil & Co., 1902. Available online at https://archive.org/details/henrythe8th00polluoft
  3. Mumby, Frank Arthur. The Youth of Henry VIII: A Narrative In Contemporary Letters. London: Constable; Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1913. Online at https://archive.org/details/youthofhenryviii00mumbuoft. [Sullivan 2:351.]
  4. Hackett, Francis. Henry the Eighth. New York: D. Liveright, 1929. [Sullivan 2:64–65.]
  5. Dunham, W. H., Jr. The Members of Henry VIII's Whole Council, 1509–1527. English Historical Review 59 (1944): 187–210. [Sullivan 1:300.]
  6. Maynard, Theodore. Henry the Eighth. Milwaukee: Bruce, 1949. [Sullivan 2:304.]
  7. MacNalty, Arthur S., Sir. Henry VIII: A Difficult Patient. Medical Viewpoint Series. London: Johnson, 1952.
  8. Elton, G. R. An Early Tudor Poor Law. Economic History Review ns 6 (1954): 55–67. Rpt. in Studies in Tudor and Stuart Politics and Government. 4 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, Vols. 1–2: 1974; Vol. 3: 1983; Vol. 4: 1992. Vol. 2: 137–54. [On a draft of the 1536 Poor Law Legislation. Elton underestimates the influence of humanism on Poor Law reform. See P. A. Fideler, Christian Humanism and Poor Law Reform.]
  9. Scarisbrick, J. J. Henry VIII. London: Eyre & Spottiswoode; Berkeley: University of California Press, 1968. New Edition. Yale English Monarchs Series. New Haven: Yale UP, 1997.
  10. Chapman, Hester W. The Sisters of Henry VIII: Margaret Tudor, Queen of Scotland, Mary Tudor, Queen of France and Duchess of Suffolk. London: Jonathan Cope, 1969. Pub. as The Thistle and the Rose. New York: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1969, 1971; New York: Pyramid Books, 1972.
    Review:
    1. G.M. Moreana 39 (1973): 87–91.
  11. Cruickshank, C. Henry VIII and the Invasion of France. New York: St. Martin's Press, [1969], 2nd rev. ed. 1991. (Previously published in 1969 as Army Royal.) [On Henry VIII's 1513 campaign in France, which led to the destruction of Therouanne and the capture of Tournai.
    Review:
    1. W. T. Walker, Sixteenth Century Journal 23 (1992): 867–68.
  12. Russell, J. G. The Field of Cloth of Gold. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1969.
    Review:
    1. Jean Rouschausse, Moreana 33 (1972): 83–85.
  13. Williams, Neville. Henry VIII and His Court. London, George Weidenfeld & Nicholson; New York: MacMillian, 1971, 1973.
  14. Fideler, P. A. Christian Humanism and Poor Law Reform in Early Tudor England. Societas 4 (1974): 269–85. [On Erasmus, More's Utopia, Vives' De subventione pauperum, and the English Poor Law of 1536.]
  15. MacDonald, W. W. The Tudor Enigma: Henry VIII and the Tudor Historians: Review Article. Cithara 15:2 (1976): 86–99.
  16. Ouvrard, J.-P. Musique à la cour de Henry VIII. Moreana 63 (1979): 43–46.
  17. Eaves, R. G. Henry VIII and James V's Regency 1524–1528, A Study in Anglo-Scottish Diplomacy. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1987.
    Review:
    1. W. K. Emond, Catholic Historical Review 74 (1988): 482–83.
  18. Lehmberg, Stanford E. Henry VII king of England, 28 June 1509–28 January 1547. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 2: 178–81.
  19. Mayer, T. F. Review: Reform and Revisionism in the Study of Henrician England. Journal of British Studies 27 (1988): 190–97. [A review of several recent books on early Tudor history.]
  20. Holmes, P. J. The Last Tudor Great Councils. Historical Journal 33 (1990): 1–22.
  21. Baumann, U. Heinrich VIII, mit Selbstzeugnissen und Bilddokumenten. Rowohlts Monographien 446. Reinbek bei Hamburg: Rowohlt Taschenbuch, 1991.
    Review:
    1. L. Znidarsic, Moreana 111/112 (1992): 185–88.
  22. Baumann, Uwe, ed. Henry VIII: In History, Historiography, and Literature. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1992.
    Review:
    1. A. J. Geritz, Moreana 121 (1995): 101–06.
  23. Ives, E. W. Henry VIII's Will: A Forensic Conundrum. Historical Journal 35 (1992): 779–804. [Sum.: p. 779.]
  24. Marc'hadour, G. Henry VIII's Quincentennial: A Retrospective. St. Thomas More Gazette 4 (Nov. 1994): 19–23. [A review of some recent books on Henry VIII.]
  25. Marc'hadour, Germain. Henry VIII and more on the Internet. Moreana 46:176 (2009): 223–24. [Review of Gale/Cengage online subscription database State Papers online, 1509–1714 http://www.gale.cengage.com.]
  26. Ives, E. B. . Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [May 2009] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/12955) [Include some bibliography. 31164 words.]
  27. Rex, Richard. The Religion of Henry VIII. The Historical Journal 57:1 (March 2014): 1–32. (http://doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X13000368)
  28. Richardson, Glenn. The Field of Cloth of Gold. New Haven: Yale UP, 2014. [See also 1969 book by J. G. Russell.]

Check Wikipedia.

Gentian Hervet (Hervetus) and England (1499–12 September 1584)

For a brief bio. see CW 7:271, n. to 6/1 (lists STC editions).

  1. Hervet, Gentian, trans. Quaedam opuscula. Sophoclis Antigone tragoedia . . . traducta . . . in Latinum, Herveti epigrammata. Lyon, apud Etienne Dolet, 1541. [USTC 140114; Gibson 348 (cf.Gibson 61): Includes an epigram on the head of More fixed on London bridge. Reprinted in Fowler's 1568 edition of More's Letter to Bugenhagen (see CW 7:6–7, n. on p.271).]
  2. Ott. M. Gentian Hervetus. The Catholic Encyclopedia (1913). Online at https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Catholic_Encyclopedia_(1913)/Gentian_Hervetus and http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07298a.htm.
  3. Humbert, A. Gentian Hervet. Ed. Jean Michel Alfred Vacant et al. Dictionnaire de Théologie Catholique. 15 vols. Paris: [s.l.: Letouzey et Ané], 1902–1950. Vol. 6 (1920): cols. 2315–2320. Online at http://jesusmarie.free.fr/dictionnaire_de_theologie_catholique_lettre_H.html
  4. Nugent, E. M., ed. Desiderius Erasmus: Sermon on the Mercy of God. Translated by Gentian Hervet. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 345, 348–57. [Gentian's Preface (348–50) and an excerpt from the translation.]
  5. McConica, J. K. English Humanists and Reformation Politics. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1965. 60–61, 66, 67–68, 73, 142, 147.
  6. Devereux, E. J. An English Glossary by Gentian Hervet. Moreana 14 (1967): 5–10.
  7. Marc'hadour, Germain. Erasmus' Sermon on The Mercy of God and its English Versions. Moreana 32:123/24 (1995): 97–115, 187–88. [Sum. pp.187–88. Compares Hervet's translation to two modern English translations.]
  8. Gentian Hervet. The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church. Edited by Frank Leslie Cross, Elizabeth A. Livingstone. Oxford: Oxford UP, 3rd ed. 2005. 767–68. Preview Online at Google Books.

John Heywood (1497–1578?)

Editions

  1. Milligan, B. A., ed. John Heywood's Works and Miscellaneous Short Poems. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1956.

Studies

  1. Bang, W. Acta Anglo-Lovaniensis. John Heywood und sein kreis. Englische Studien 38 (1907): 234–50.
  2. Reed, Arthur William. John Heywood and His Friends. The Library 3rd ser., VIII (1917): 240–70 + 289–314. [Wentworth 87.]
  3. Reed, Arthur William. The Canon of John Heywood's Plays. The Library 3rd ser. IX:33 (): 27–57. [Wentworth 86. On the similarities between More's Merry Jest and some of Heywood's plays.]
  4. Bolwell, R. W. The Life and Works of John Heywood. Ithaca, NY: Columbia UP, 1921. [Unpublished thesis or printed book?]
  5. Reed, Arthur William. The Heywoods, The Beginnings of the English Secular and Romantic Drama II: The Canon of John Heywood's Plays, Heywood Appendix I: John Heywood the Dramatist: Confusion with Others of the Same Name, and Heywood Appendix II: Heywood's Second Letter to Lord Burleigh from Malines. Early Tudor Drama: Medwall, the Rastells, Heywood, and the More Circle. London: Methuen, 1926. 29–71, 118–47, 234–38. rpt. New York: Octagon Books, 1969. [For review(s), see More and Tudor Drama.]
  6. Bère, Rupert de la. John Heywood Entertainer. London: G. Allen & Unwin, 1937. [Sulivan 1:255.]
  7. Schoeck, R. J. Satire of Wolsey in Heywood's Play of Love. Notes and Queries 196 (1951): 112–14.
  8. Lewis, C. S. English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, excluding Drama. Oxford History of English Literature, Vol. 3. London: Oxford UP, 1954. 1973. 145–47.
  9. Schoeck, R. J. A Common Tudor Expletive and Legal Parody in Heywood's Play of Love. Notes and Queries ns 3 (1956): 375–76 + 505. [Brief note and query.]
  10. Milligan, B. A. Humor and Satire in Heywood's Epigrams. Studies in Honor of T. W. Baldwin. Ed. D. W. Cameron. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1958. 16–33.
  11. Whitlock, B. D. The Heredity and Childhood of John Donne. [1959] See Thomas More and John Donne.
  12. Walker, Greg. Conservative Drama: John Heywood's Play of the Weather. Plays of Persuasion: Drama and Politics at the Court of Henry VIII. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1991. 133–168.

Ellis Heywood (Heliseo Heivodo) (1529–1578)

Ellis Heywood's Il Moro

Editions

  1. Heywood, Ellis. Il Moro d'Heliseo Heivodo Inglese. All'illustrissimo Cardinal Reginaldo Polo. Fiorenze, appresso Lorenzo Torrentino, July 1556. [USTC 835718; Shaaber H205; Gibson 350; Sullivan 2:106–107; L'Univers 546. A fictional dialogue set at Chelsea involving More, dedicated to Cardinal Pole.]
  2. Deakins, Roger Lee, ed. Il Moro: Ellis Heywood's Dialogue in Memory of Thomas More. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1972. [English translation and reduced facsimile reproduction of original italian (4 sheets per page).]
    Review(s):
    1. Penelope Winder, Moreana 52 (1976): 103–04.
    2. Franklin B. Williams, Jr., Il Moro: Another Viewpoint, Moreana 52 (1976): 105–06.
  3. Pizzorno, Patrizia Grimaldi, ed. Il Moro. Studi (Accademia toscana di scienze e lettere La Colombaria), 217. Florence: L. S. Olschki, 2003. [Facsimile edition?]

Studies

  1. Vian, Nello. San Tommaso More tra la Saga e il Mito. Miscellanea Pio Paschini, Studi di Storia Ecclesiastica. Lateranum, Nova series, an. 14–15. 2 vols. Rome: Facultas Theologica Pontificii Athenaei Lateranensis, 1948–49. II: 213–22. [Worldcat OCLC 883471959, 556481895, etc. Cited by Deakins, p. xviii, n.11.]
  2. Deakins, Roger Lee. Introduction. Il Moro: Ellis Heywood's Dialogue in Memory of Thomas More. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1972. ix–xxxvii. [Geritz F047; Wentworth 107.]
  3. Kinney, Arthur F. Humanist Poetics: Thought, Rhetoric, and Fiction in Sixteenth-century England. Amherst, MA: U of Massachusetts P, 1986. 151–53, 475.
  4. Rhodes, Dennis E. Il Moro: An Italian View of Sir Thomas More. England and the Continental Renaissance: Essays in Honour of J. B. Trapp. Ed. E. Chaney and P. Mack. Woodbridge, Suffolk: The Boydell P, 1990. 67–71. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 117 (1994): 116. Brief biography of Ellis Heywood. Heywood was a man of one book. Lists locations of copies of Il Moro.]
  5. Flynn, Dennis. Heywood, Ellis (1529–1578). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/13180)
  6. Bars Closel, Régis Augustine. Fictional Remembrances of Sir Thomas More: Part I — The Sixteenth Century. [2016] See More and Tudor Drama (excluding Shakespeare).

John Holt (Holte) (d.1504)

  1. Letter of Thomas More to John Holt, [London, c.November 1501]. See Thomas More Calendar: Thomas More to John Holt.
  2. Holt, John. [Lac Puerorum. A Latin Grammar in English.] [London: Wynkyn de Worde, 1505?]. [STC 13603.7; ESTC S124868; USTC 516129. Only a fragmentary copy survives.]
  3. Holt, John. [Lac Puerorum.] [Antwerpen]: Jan van Doesborch, 1507. [STC 13606.5; ESTC S93018; USTC 415561.]
  4. Holt, John. Lac Puerorum. Mylke for chyldren. London: Wynkyn de Worde, [1508]. [STC 13604; ESTC S124869; USTC 501009.]
  5. Holt, John. Lac Puerorum. [Antwerpen]: Adriaen van Berghen, [c.1510]. [STC 13606; ESTC S109994; USTC400294.]
  6. Holt, John. Lac Puerorum. Mylke for chyldren. London: Richard Pynson, [1510?]. [STC 13605; ESTC S109422; USTC 501145.]
  7. Holt, John. Lac Puerorum. Anglice Mylke for chyldren. [Antwerpen]: Govaert Bac, [c.1511]. [STC 13606.3; ESTC S5113; USTC 400304.]
  8. Holt, John. Lac Puerorum. Mylke for chyldren. [Antwerpen]: Govaert Bac, [c.1511]. [Not in ESTC; ISTC ih00299000; USTC 438830. Copy at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.]
  9. Nelson, William. Thomas More, Grammarian and Orator. [1943] See Thomas More: Latin Language. Rhetoric and Grammar.
  10. Reed, Arthur William. Young More. [1949] See Thomas More: The Young More
  11. Fletcher, Harris. The Earliest(?) Printing of Sir Thomas More's Two Epigrams to John Holt. [1958] See Thomas More: Latin Epigrams
  12. Schoeck, R. J. John Holt, of Chichester. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 2: 198.
  13. Orme, Nicholas. John Holt (d. 1504), Tudor grammarian. The Library 6th ser., 18 (1996): 283–305.
  14. Orme, Nicholas. Holt, John (d. 1504). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [Jan. 2008] http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/13617

William Horman (1457–1535)

  1. Horman, William. Vulgaria uiri doctissimi Guil. Hormani Caesarisburgensis. London: J. Pynson, 1519. Rpt. (The English Experience 745) Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1975. [Rpt. of STC 13811.]
  2. Horman, William. Antibossicon: Guil. Hormani ad Guilielmum Lilium. Epistola Aldrisij ad Hormanum. Epistola protouatis ad eundem Hormanum. Apologeticon Hormani ad protouatem bifarium. London: Pynson, 1521. [STC 13807; ESTC ***. Includes reference to Utopia on sig. g1 (Boswell #340, p.172).]
  3. Nugent, E. M., ed. William Horman. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 123–26. [Excerpts from Horman's Vulgaria.]
  4. Orme, Nicholas. Horman, William (1457–1535). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [2004] http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/13779

Richard Hyrde (d.25 March 1528)

Richard Hyrde's name is also variously spelt Hirt, Hirde, Herde, Harte.

Editions and Translations

The Instruction of a Christen Woman

  1. A very frutefull and pleasant boke called the instructio[n] of a Christen woma[n], made fyrst in Laten, and dedicated vnto the quenes good grace, by the right famous clerke mayster Lewes Vives, and turned out of Laten into Englysshe by Rycharde Hyrd. whiche boke who so redeth diligently shal haue knowlege of many thynges, wherin he shal take great pleasure, and specially women shall take great co[m]modyte and frute towarde the[n]creace of vertue [and] good maners. [Imprynted at London : In Fletestrete, in the house of Thomas Berthelet nere to the Cundite, at the signe of Lucrece, [1529?]] [STC 24856; ESTC S105250.]
  2. A very frutefull and pleasant boke called the instructio[n] of a Christen woma[n], made fyrst in Laten, and dedicated vnto the quenes good grace, by the right famous clerke mayster Lewes Viues, and turned out of Laten in to Enlgysshe by Rycharde Hyrd. whiche boke who so redeth diligently shall haue knowlege of many thynges, wherin he shal take great pleasure, and specially women shal take great co[m]modyte and frute towarde the[n]creace of vertue [and] good maners. [Imprinted at London: in Fletestrete, in the house of Thomas Berthelet nere to the Cundite, at the sygne of Lucrece, [1529?]] [STC 24856.5; ESTC S95706.]
  3. [A very fruitefull and pleasant booke called the instructio[n] of a Christen woma[n], made fyrst in Laten, and dedicated vnto the quenes good grace, by the right famous clerke mayster Lewes Vives, and turned out of Laten into Englysshe by Richard Hyrd. whiche boke who so redeth diligently shal haue knowlege of many thynges, wherein hew shal take great pleasure, and specially women shall take great co[m]modyte and frute towarde the[n]creace of vertue [and] good maners.] [Imprinted at London : In Fletestrete, in the house of Thomas Berthelet printer vnto the kynges mooste noble grace, at the signe of Lucrece, [1531?]] [STC 24857; ESTC S105252.]
  4. A very fruteful and pleasant boke callyd the Instruction of a Christen woman, made fyrste in latyne, by the right famous clerk mayster Lewes Viues, and tourned oute of latyne into Englysshe by Richard Hyrde. [Impress. Londini : in [a]edibus Thom[a]e Berth. regij impressoris. cum priuilegio ad imprimendum solum, Anno M.D.XLI. [1541]] [STC 24858; ESTC S119322.]
  5. A very frutful and pleasant boke called the Instruction of a christen woman, made fyrst in latyne, by the right famous clerke mayster Lewes Viues, and tourned out of latyne into Englishe by Rycharde Hyrde. Londini : [In [a]edibus Thom[a]e Berth[eleti]], Anno. M.D.XLVII [1547] [STC 24859; ESTC 24859.]
  6. A very fruteful and pleasant boke called the Instruction of a christen woman, made firste in latyne, by the right famous clerke mayster Lewes Viues, and tourned out of latyne into Englishe by Rychard Hyrde. Londini : Anno. M D. LVII. T[homas]. P[owell]., [1557] [STC 24860; ESTC S119324.]
  7. A very fruteful and pleasant booke called the instruction of a Christen woman, made firste in latyne, by the right famous clerke mayster Lewes Viues, and tourned out of latyne into Englishe by Rycharde Hyrde. Londini : [printed by H. Wykes], Anno M.D.LVII. [1557] [i.e. 1567?] [STC 24861; ESTC S125566.]
  8. A verie fruitfull and pleasant booke, called the instruction of a christian woman. Made first in Latin, by the right famous cleark M. Lewes Viues, and translated out of Latine into Englishe, by Richard Hyrde. London: printed by Robert Walde-graue, dwelling without Temple-barre, neare vnto Sommerset-house, 1585. [STC 24862; ESTC S106843.]
  9. A verie fruit full and pleasant booke; called the instruction of a Christian woman. Made first in Latin, by the right famous Clearke M. Leuues Viues, and translated out of Latin into English, by Richard Hyrde. London: Printed by Iohn Danter, dwelling in Hosier-Lane neere Holburne Conduit, 1592. [STC 24863; ESTC S100746.]
  10. Watson, Foster, ed. Instruction of a Christian Woman. Vives and the Renascence Education of Women. London: Edward Arnold; New York: Longmans, Green and Co., 1912. 29–136. [A partial modernized edition of Richard Hyrde's translation, including Hyrde's Dedicatory Preface to Queen Catherine (29–31).]
  11. Nugent, E. M., ed. Juan Luis Vives: The Instruction of a Christian Woman. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 73–79. [Includes Hyrd's Preface (73–75) and translations of Book I, Chapters 4–5.]
  12. Kuschmierz, R. L. M., ed. The Instruction of a Christian Woman: A Critical Edition of the Tudor Translation. Diss. U of Pittsburgh, 1961.
  13. Bornstein, D., ed. Distaves and Dames: Renaissance Treatises for and about Women. Delmar, NY: Scholars' Facsimiles and Reprints, 1978. [Facsimile edition of First edition of Hyrde's translation.]
  14. Klein, Joan Larsen, ed. Daughters, Wives, and Widows: Writings by Men about Women and Marriage in England, 1500–1640. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1992. 97–122. [Excerpts from Hyrde's translation.]
  15. Beauchamp, Virginia Walcott, et al. The Instruction of a Christen Woman: Juan Luis Vives. Translated by Richard Hyrde. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 2002.

Preface to Margaret Roper's A Devout Treatise on the Pater Noster

  1. Hyrde, Richard. Richard Hyrde vnto the moost studyous and vertuous mayde Fraunces .S. [Staverton] sendeth gretynge and well to fare. Chelsea, 1 October 1524. A deuoute treatise vpon the Pater noster, made fyrst in latyn by the moost famous doctour mayster Erasmus Roterodamus, and tourned in to englisshe by a yong vertuous and well lerned gentylwoman of. xix. yere of age. By Margaret Roper. [Imprinted at London: In fletestrete, in the house of Thomas Berthelet nere to the Cundite, at the signe of Lucrece, [1526?]], sigs a1–b4***. [STC 10477; ESTC S109306.]
  2. Hyrde, Richard. Richard Hyrde vnto the moost studyous and vertuous mayde Fraunces .S. [Staverton] sendeth gretynge and well to fare. Chelsea, 1 October 1524. A deuoute treatise vpon the Pater noster, made fyrst in latyn by the moost famous doctour mayster Erasmus Roterodamus, and turned into englishe by a yo[n]ge vertuous and well lerned gentylwoman of xix. yere of age. By Margaret Roper. [Imprinted at Lo[n]don : in Fletestrete, by Thomas Berthelet, printer vnto the kynges mooste noble grace, dwellynge at the signe of Lucrece, [1531?]]. sigs ***. [STC 10477.5; ESTC S5359.]
  3. Watson, Foster, ed. Preface to A Devout Treatise on the Pater Noster. Vives and the Renascence Education of Women. London: Edward Arnold; New York: Longmans, Green and Co., 1912. 159–74. [The same volume also contains Hyrde's translation of Vives' De institutione foeminae christianae.]
  4. Marc'hadour, Germain, ed. Défence et illustration des humanités feminines. By Richard Hyrde. Moreana 13 (1967): 5–24. [Richard Hyrde's Preface to Margaret Roper's translation. English text and French translation on facing pages.]
  5. DeMolen, R., ed. A Devout Treatise Upon the Pater Noster . . . by Desiderius Erasmus. Translated by Margaret More Roper. [1971] See Margaret Roper: Editions.
  6. The Early Modern Englishwoman: A Facsimile Library of Essential Works. Series I. Printed Writings, 1500–1600. Part 2, Volume 4. Early Tudor Translators: Margaret Beaufort, Margaret More Roper, and Mary Basset. [2001] See Margaret Roper: Editions.

Studies, etc

No bio in ODNB or CE; see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Hyrde. This section deals principally with Hyrde rather than Vives.

  1. Gardiner and Foxe to Tuke, Orvieto, 23 and 27 March 1528. St.P. IV/2 ; LP 2:#4090, #4103, pp.1808, 1812. [L'Univers 407 and n5. (#4090) One of their servants is now in great danger from the wetting,—a young man, learned in physic, Greek and Latin, whose death would be a great loss. We suppose ye know him well. His name is Richard Herde. He was wont to resort much to me, Steven Gardiner, there, and sometime dwelled with Master Chancellor of the Duchy (More). Master Gregory says that in summer the south wind brings pestilence here from a river within a mile of the city. (#4103) Richard Herde died on Lady Day [25 March], to our great discomfort, as we had great confidence in his learning and experience in physic [medicine]. Hyrde was part of the English Embassy to the Pope about Henry's divorce.]
  2. Bayne, Diane Valeri. The Instruction of a Christian Woman: Richard Hyrde and the Thomas More Circle. Moreana 45 (1975): 5–15. [Sullivan S2:11–12. On Richard Hyrde's Preface to Margaret Roper's translation of Erasmus's Precatio Dominica.]
  3. Benson, P. J. The New Ideal in England: Thomas More, Juan Luis Vives and Richard Hyrde. [1992] See More: Feminism and Education.
  4. Beauchamp, Virginia Walcott, et al. Introduction. The Instruction of a Christen Woman: Juan Luis Vives. Translated by Richard Hyrde. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 2002. xv–cxv. [Includes sections Hyrde's English Translation (lxvi–lxxvi) and The History of the Tudor Text (lxxvii–xciii).]

See also More: Margaret Roper and Spanish Renaissance: Juan Luis Vives.