International Thomas More Bibliography (H):
Contemporaries of Thomas More, Part III: Early English Renaissance (J—W)


 

Note: The Contemporaries of Thomas More Bibliography is a very extensively revised and augmented version of an unpublished bibliography of the Early English Renaissance and Reformation that I compiled while I was working on my Ph. D. Dissertation. Any comments, corrections, suggested additions or queries can be sent to the compiler and editor at lakowskir@gmail.com

Version 1.4a (); © Romuald I. Lakowski ,


Table of Contents

International Thomas More Bibliography

Abbreviations
Opera Omnia, Correspondence and Humanistic Works
Polemical and Devotional Works and Trial
Background Studies
Family and Friends, and Biographies
Thomas More and the Creative Arts
Utopia Part A: Editions and Translations
Utopia Part B: Studies
Calendars of the Letters and Papers of Thomas More, John Fisher, and John Colet (Under Development)

Contemporaries of Thomas More

Part I: Fisher, Colet and the Carthusians
Part II: Early English English Renaissance (A—H)
Part III: Early English English Renaissance (J—W)


Contemporaries of Thomas More Bibliography, Part III: Early English Renaissance (J—W)

I plan to add at least two more files to the Contemporaries of Thomas More in the future: one of the English Reformation (to 1540) and another on the Continental (Northern) Renaissance and Reformation (to 1540). The entries in this section are modelled at least partially on The Contemporaries of Erasmus (Toronto: 1985–87) and will hopefully eventually also include short biographies.


William Knight (1475/76–1547)
William Latimer (d. before 17 Oct. 1545)
Stephen Leder (c1492–6 February 1535)
Add Oliver Leder
Add Edward Lee and Joyeuse Leigh (Joyce Lee)
John Leland (1506?–1552)
George Lily (d.1559)
William Lily (c1468–c10 December 1522)
Thomas Linacre (1460?–1524)
The Lisle Letters
John Longland (1473–1547)
Thomas Lupset (c1498–27 December 1530)
Dominic Mancini's De occupatione (1483)
Margaret of York, Duchess of Burgundy (1446–1503)
Add William Melton (and Edward Powell?)
Sir Richard Moryson (Morison, Morrison) (d. 17 March 1556)
Cardinal John Morton (c1420–1500)
Richard Pace (1482–1536(?))
John Palsgrave (d c12 September 1554)
William Parron (Gulielmus Parronus Placentinus) (d.1503)
Henry Patenson (Pattenson, Pattison) (1487/88–26 March 1543)
Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury (1473–1541)
Cardinal Reginald Pole (1500–17 November 1558)
Sir Edward Poynings (Ponynges, Poyninges) (1459–22 October 1521)
Richard Pynson (c.1449–1529/30)
Add Ratcliffe/Radcliff
John Rastell (1475–1536)
William Rastell (1508–1565)
Richard III (1452–1485)
Antony Woodville, Lord Rivers (c. 1440–25 June 1483)
Margaret More Roper (1505–1544)
William Roper (1496–1575)
John Rous (d.1492)
Thomas Ruthall, of Cirencester (d. 4 February 1523)
Add Richard Sampson
Prior William Sellyng (Selling) (c.1430–1494)
Elizabeth [Jane] Shore (d. 1526/1527?)
John Skelton and Humanism (c1460–21 June 1529)
Sir John Spelman (c.1480–1546)
Walter Smith (Smyth) (fl. 1525)
Thomas Spinelly (Spinelli, Spynell) (1472–26 August 1522)
John Stanbridge (1463–1510)
Add Henry Standish
Thomas Starkey (c1495/98–1538)
Add entry for the Staffertons (Stavertons)
Add John Stokesley
Syon Abbey (1415–1539)
Add Sir George Throckmorton
Cuthbert Tunstall (Tunstal) (1474–1559)
Christopher Urswick (Urswyck) (c1448–24 March 1522)
Polydore (Polidore) Vergil (Virgil) (c.1470–c.1555)
Robert Wakefield (d. 1537)
William Warham, Archbishop of Canterbury (c1452–1532)
Richard Whitford (Whytford) (1476?–1543)
Robert Whittinton (1480?–1535?)
Nicholas Wilson (d. 1548)
Sir Richard Wingfield (c 1469–22 July 1525)
Sir Robert Wingfield (c1464–18 March 1539)
Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Archbishop of York (1473–1530)
Elizabeth Woodville [Wydeville] (c.1437–1492), Queen Consort
Sir Thomas Wyatt's Translation of Plutarch's Quyete of Mynde (1527)


Contemporaries of Thomas More, Part III: Early English Renaissance (J–W)

  1.  

Biographies and Bibliographies

William Knight (1475/76–1547)

See Herbrüggen/Rogers #11A, #14, #42, #49, #51, #53, #55, #94, #103A, #103B, #103C (=Rogers #98), #103D (=Rogers #13), #169B–#169F (5 letters) and passim.

  1. CFG. William Knight of London,1476–29 September 1547. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 2: 264–65.
  2. Clark, Richard. Knight, William (1475/6–1547). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [May 2005]. ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/15738) [Includes bibliography.]

William Latimer (d. before 17 Oct. 1545)

See brief biographies in Allen #207/22, n. on p.438; and Rogers #67/26, n. on p.133.

  1. Letter From William Latimer to Erasmus, Oxford, 30 January 1517. See Correspondence of John Fisher.
  2. Allen, P.S. Linacre and Latimer in Italy. English Historical Review 18 (1903): 514–17.
  3. McConica, James K. William Latimer d. before 17 October 1545. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 2: 302–303.
  4. Orme, Nicholas. Latimer, William (c. 1467–1545). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [Jan. 2004] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/16104).

Stephen Leder (c1492–6 February 1535)

  1. Letter From Thomas More to Master <Stephen> Leder, Tower of London, Saturday, 16 January 1535. See Calendar of the Letters of Thomas More.
  2. House, Seymour B. Thomas More and Holy Orders: More's Views of the English Clergy, Both Secular and Regular. Ph.D. Diss. U of St. Andrews, 1987. p.227. [Cited in de Silva, Last Letters, p.187; see also John Guy, A Daughter's Love, 2008, p.247 and pp.321–322; and House, Moreana 45:174 (2008):37n6.]

John Leland (1506?–1552)

Editions

See also Wikipedia and http://www.liquisearch.com/john_leland_antiquary/bibliography.

  1. Leland, John. The laboryouse Journey & serche of Johan Leylande for Englandes antiquitees. London: J. Bale, 1549. Rpt. (The English Experience 750) Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1975. [Rpt. of STC 15445.]
  2. Newton, Thomas, ed. Principium, ac Illustrium Aliquot et eruditorum in Anglia Virorum Encomia, Trophaea, Genethliaca & Epithalmia. London: ***, 1589. [STC ***; ***. Contains 250 of Leland's epigrams.]
  3. Leland, John. The itinerary of John Leland the Antiquary. . . . Publish'd from the original MS. in the Bodleian Library by Thomas Hearne M.A. To which is prefix'd Mr. Leland's New-Year's Gift: And at the end is subjoyn'd A Discourse concerning some Antiquities lately found in York-Shire. 9 vols. Oxford : printed at the Theater for the publisher, [1710–1712]. Rpt. Oxford, Printed at the Theater for J. Fletcher and J. Pote, 1744. Rpt. 3rd ed. Oxford: Printed at the Theatre; For James Fletcher, in the Turl, and Joseph Pote, at Eton College, MDCCLXX. [1770].
  4. Hearne, Thomas, ed. Johannis Lelandi Antiquarii de rebus Britannicis Collectanea. 6 vols. Oxford: ***, 1715. 2nd ed. 1770. [ESTC ***.]
  5. Smith, Lucy Toulmin, ed. The itinerary of John Leland, in or about the years 1535–1543. Parts I to [XI]. Edited by Lucy Toulmin Smith; with a foreword by Thomas Kendrick. 5 vols. London, George Bell & Sons, 1906–1910. Rpt. London: Centaur P; Carbondale, Southern Illinois UP, 1964. [Based on the original manuscripts; omits additional material added in the 18th Century editions.]

Excerpts

  1. Thomson, P., ed. Leland's Elegies on Wyatt. Wyatt: The Critical Heritage. The Critical Heritage Series. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1974, 1985. 24–27. [Extracts from Naeniae in mortem Thomae Viati equitis incomparabilis. STC 15446.]
  2. Beal, P., ed. John Leland. Index of English Literary Manuscripts. Vol. I: 1450–1625. 5 vols. London: Mansell; New York: R. R. Bowker, 1980. 1/2: 299–310. Online at http://www.celm-ms.org.uk/introductions/LelandJohn.html and http://www.celm-ms.org.uk/authors/lelandjohn.html.

Studies

See http://www.u.arizona.edu/~ctb/16ijkl.html and http://www.pims.ca/pdf/st172.pdf.

  1. Hudson, Hoyt Hopewell. John Leland's List of Early English Humanists. Huntington Library Quarterly 2 (1939): 301–04.
  2. Liddell, J. R. Leland's Lists of Manuscripts in Lincolnshire Monasteries. English Historical Review 54 (1939): 88–95.
  3. Bradner, L. [John Leland.]. Musae Anglicanae: A History of Anglo-Latin Poetry, 1500–1925. The Modern Language Association of America, General Series 10. New York: Modern Language Association of America; Oxford: Oxford UP, 1940. 25–32.
  4. Hudson, Hoyt Hopewell. [John Leland.] The Epigram in the English Renaissance. Printon: Princeton UP, 1947. Rpt. New York: Octagon Books, 1966. 87–92.
    Review:
    1. L. Bradner, Modern Language Notes 63 (1948): 577–78.
  5. Skeat, T. C. Two Lost Works of John Leland. English Historical Review 65 (1950): 505–08.
  6. Lewis, C. S. English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, excluding Drama. Oxford History of English Literature, Vol. 3. London: Oxford UP, 1954. 1973. 297–98.
  7. Bradner, L. Some Unpublished Poems of John Leland. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 71 (1956): 827–36.
  8. Dorsch, T. S. Two English Antiquaries: John Leland and John Stow. Essays and Studies ns 12 (1959): 18–35.
  9. Hutton, J. John Leland's Laudatio Pacis. Studies in Philology 58 (1961): 616–26. Rpt. Essays on Renaissance Poetry. Ed. R. Guerlac. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1980. 319–29.
  10. Lapidge, M. Some Remnants of Bede's lost Liber Epigrammatum. English Historical Review 90 (1975): 798–20. [On some surviving epigrams of Bede transcribed by John Leland in his Collectanea.]
  11. Carley, J. Four Poems in Praise of Erasmus by John Leland. Erasmus in English 11 (1981/82): 26–27.
  12. Carley, James P. John Leland's Cygnea cantio: A Neglected Tudor River Poem. Humanistica Lovaniensia 32 (1983): 225–241.
  13. Carley, James P. John Leland's Lists of Manuscripts: His Aims, His Methods of Compilation and the Value of His Lists for the Modern Scholar. Manuscripta 27 (1983), 4. [Summary of conference paper.]
  14. Carley, James P. Polydore Vergil and John Leland on King Arthur: The Battle of the Books. [1984] See Polydore Vergil.
  15. Carley, James P. John Leland in Paris: The Evidence of His Poetry. Studies in Philology 83 (1986): 1–50. [Includes some of Leland's Latin epigrams with English translations, pp. 22–50.]
  16. Carley, James P. John Leland and the Foundations of the Royal Library: The Westminster Inventory of 1542. Bulletin of the Society for Renaissance Studies 7 (1989): 13–22.

George Lily (d.1559)

See Shaaber L92–L101, and ARCR I:739. The son of Thomas More's friend William Lily, and uncle of the Elizabethan Write John Lyly. He made important contributions to cartography and also provided the historical accounts for Paolo Giovio's Descriptio Britanniae. The four references to More by Jovius quoted in Stapleton's Life are derived from Lily. See also Sullivan II:234-35 (and 176-77).

  1. Lily, George. Elogia virorum literis illustrium. [See M. Schott, Die englische Biographik der Tudor-Zeit, p.155, no. 104.]

Studies

  1. Feuillerat, Albert. John Lyly: contribution à l'histoire de la renaissance en Angleterre. Cambridge: 1910. 11–14.
  2. Schütt, M. George Lily's Elogia. Die englische Biographik de Tudor-Zeit. Hamburg: Friederichsen, de Gruyter & Co., 1930. 54–57.
  3. Mayer, T. F. Lily, George (d. 1559). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Jan 2008] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/16663) [Includes bibliography.]

William Lily (c1468–c10 December 1522)

See Shaaber L102–L174, USTC, CE, ODNB and ESTC.

Editions

  1. Lily, William. Epigrammata Guil. Lilii Angli. London: Richard Pynson, 1521. [London : W. de Worde, 1522] [STC 15606.5; ESTC S2183.]
  2. Lily, William. Of the tryumphe, and the verses that Charles themperour, and the most myghty redouted kyng of England, Henry the. viii. were saluted with, passyng through London. [London]: Richard Pynson, [1522]. [STC 15606.7; ESTC S104955.]
  3. Bradner, L. and C. A. Lynch, eds. Progymnasmata: Thomae Mori et Guilelmi Lilii sodalium. The Latin Epigrams of Thomas More. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1953. 6–14, 129–36. Rpt. in Latin Poems. Vol. 3, Part II of The Yale Edition of the Complete Works of St. Thomas More. Ed. C. H. Miller, L. Bradner, C. A. Lynch, and R. P. Oliver. New Haven: Yale UP, 1984. 78–95, 321–26.
  4. Lily, William A Shorte Introduction to Grammar. Intro. V. J. Flynn. New York: Scholars' facsimiles & reprints, 1945.
  5. Nugent, E. M., ed. Lily's Grammar: Lily's Rudimenta. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 116–17, 121–22.

Studies

  1. Baskervill, C. R. William Lily's Verse for the Entry of Charles V into London. Huntington Library Bulletin no. 9 (1936): 1–14.
  2. Stewart, M. B. William Lily's Contribution to Classical Study. Classical Journal 33 (1938): 217–25.
  3. Flynn, Vincent Joseph. The Grammatical Writings of William Lily, ?1468–?1523. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 37 (1943): 85–113.
  4. Hudson, Hoyt Hopewell. [William Lily.] The Epigram in the English Renaissance. Printon: Princeton UP, 1947. Rpt. New York: Octagon Books, 1966. 82–87.
  5. Allen, C. G. The Sources of Lily's Latin Grammar. A Review of the Facts and Some Further Suggestions. The Library 5th ser. 9 (1954): 85–100.
  6. Allen, C. G. Certayne Briefe Rules and Lily's Latin Grammar. The Library 5th ser. 14 (1959) 49–53.
  7. Tournoy, Gilbert. La Poésie de William Lily pour le diptyque de Quentin Metsijs. Moreana 97 (1988): 63–66. [Summ.: Geritz F330.]
  8. Carlson, David R. Printer's Needs: Wynkyn de Worde's Piracy of William Lily's Epigrammata in 1522. English Humanist Books: Writers and Patrons, Manuscript and Print, 1475–1525. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1993. 123–141, 231–239, and Figs. 23–27, between pp.126–127.

Thomas Linacre (1460?–1524)

See Shaaber L175–L328, USTC, ODNB, CE and ESTC, google and Internet Archive.org.

  1. Johnson, John Noble. The Life of Thomas Linacre: Doctor in Medicine, Physician to King Henry VIII; the tutor and friend of Sir Thomas More, and the founder of the college of physicians in London: with memoirs of his contemporaries, and of the rise and progress of learning, more particularly of the schools from the ninth to the sixteenth century inclusive. London: Edward Lumley, 1835. Online at https://archive.org/details/b21471496. [Sullivan 2:168.]
  2. Williamson, Richard Thomas. English physicians of the past; short sketches of the life and work of Linacre, Gilbert, Harvey, Glisson, Willis, Sydenham, Mead, Heberden, Baker, J. & P.M. Latham, Bright. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: A. Reid, 1923. 7–19. Online at https://archive.org/details/englishphysician00willuoft.
  3. Allen, P. S. Linacre and Latimer in Italy. English Historical Review 18 (1903): 514–17.
  4. Fulton, J. F. Early Medical Humanists, Leonicenus, Linacre, Thomas Elyot. [1934] See Thomas Elyot.
  5. Mitchell, R. J. Thomas Linacre and Italy. English Historical Review 50 (1935): 696–98.
  6. O'Donovan, W. J. Thomas Linacre. Great Catholics. London: Nicholson and Watson, 1938. 130–38.
  7. Weiss, Roberto. Notes on Thomas Linacre. Miscellanea Giovanni Mercati. Vol. IV. Letteratura Classica e Umanistica. Roma: Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, 1946. 373–80.
  8. Weiss, Roberto. Un allievo inglese del Poliziano: Thomas Linacre. Il Poliziano e il suo tempo: atti del IV Convegno internazionale di studi sul Rinascimento. Istituto nazionale di studi sul Rinascimento. Firenze: G.C. Sansoni, 1957. 231–36.
  9. Marc'hadour, G. Thomas More and Thomas Linacre. [1967] See More's Family, Friends and Descendents.
  10. Bennett, J. P. John Morer's Will: Thomas Linacre and Prior Sellyng's Greek Teaching. Studies in the Renaissance 15 (1968): 70–91.
  11. Maddison, F., M. Pelling, and C. Webster, eds. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. With an index by Margaret Post. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1977. [Articles also listed separately.]
    Review:
    1. G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 61 (1979): 53–56.
    2. M. H. Saffron Renaissance Quarterly 31 (1978): 235–37.
  12. Barber, Giles. Thomas Linacre: A Bibliographical Survey of his Works. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Ed. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 290–336. [A bibliography of editions of Linacre's own works and and translations from Galen.]
  13. Clough, Cecil H. Thomas Linacre, Cornelio Vitelli, and Humanistic Studies at Oxford. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Ed. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 1–23.
  14. Durling, R. J. Linacre and Medical Humanism. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Ed. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 76–106.
  15. Fletcher, J. M. Linacre's Lands and Lectureships. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Ed. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 107–97. [Includes an appendix of documents (pp. 146–97), consisting of Linacre's indentures and will.]
  16. Hill, M. An Iconography of Thomas Linacre. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Ed. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 354–74 + 20 plates at end of volume.
  17. Lewis, R. G. The Linacre Lectureships Subsequent to their Foundation. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Ed. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 223–64.
  18. Pagel, W. Medical Humanism — A Historical Necessity in the Era of the Renaissance. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Ed. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 375–86.
  19. Pelling, M. Published References to Thomas Linacre. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Ed. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 337–53. [A bibliography of secondary sources.]
  20. Pelling, M. The Refoundation of the Linacre Lectureships in the Nineteenth Century. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Eds. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 265–89.
  21. Schmitt, C. B. Linacre and Italy. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Eds. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 36–75.
  22. Thomson, D. F. S. Linacre's Latin Grammars. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Eds. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 24–35.
  23. Webster, C. Thomas Linacre and the Foundation of the College of Physicians. Essays on the Life and Works of Thomas Linacre. c.1460–1524. Ed. F. Maddison, M. Pelling and C. Webster. Oxford: Clarendon, 1977. 198–222.
  24. Jensen, K. De emendata structura Latini sermonis: The Latin Grammar of Thomas Linacre. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 49 (1986): 106–25.
  25. Trapp, J. B. Erasmus, John Colet, Thomas More and Thomas Linacre. [1991] See More: Life of Pico.
  26. Arnold, Jonathan A. The English Erasmians: Thomas Linacre, Thomas Grocyn and Thomas Lupset. The Great Humanists: An Introduction. London:I. B. Tauris. 2011. 189–206, 285–89.
  27. Lochman, Daniel. Spiritus, ecclesiae anima: Colet, Linacre, and a Galenic Mystical Body. [] See John Colet: General Studies. [See Lochman's Moreana article for Bibliography on Linacre.]

Add CE and ONDB.

The Lisle Letters

Editions

  1. Byrne, M. St. C., ed. The Lisle Letters. 6 vols. Chicago: Chicago UP, 1981.
    Review:
    1. G. R. Elton, London Review of Books 3:13 16th Jul. 1981: 3–5 (rpt. in G. R. Elton, Studies in Tudor and Stuart Politics and Government, 4 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, Vols. 1–2: 1974; Vol. 3: 1983; Vol. 4: 1992; 3: 436–44).
    2. M. Levine, Renaissance Quarterly 35 (1982): 491–95.
    3. G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 79/80 (1983): 177–83.
    4. D. Starkey, History 68 (1983): 317–18.
  2. Byrne, M. St. C., ed. The Lisle Letters: An Abridgement. Foreward by Hugh Trevor-Roper. Selected and Arranged by Bridget Boland. Chicago: Chicago UP, 1983.
    Review:
    1. F. Williams, Moreana 83/84 (1984): 55–56.

Studies

  1. Bridbury, A. R. The Lisle Letters. Economic History Review ns 35 (1982): 573–80.
  2. Trevor-Roper, H. Upstairs Downstairs in the Sixteenth Century. American Scholar 51 (1982): 410–23. Rpt. as The Lisle Letters. in Renaissance Essays. London: Seeker & Warburg, 1985; Fontana Books, 1986. 76–93.
  3. Slavin, A. J. The Lisle Letters and the Tudor State. Sewanee Review 90 (1982): 135–42.

John Longland, Bishop of Lincoln (1473–1547)

For short bios. see Allen 6:#1535, pp.1–2 (CWE 11:2–3); Rogers #83/1002–1007 and n1002 p.192 and CW 15: 268/26–270/2 and n. on p.588. Check biblography in CE and ODNB, etc.

  1. Blench, J. W. John Longland and Roger Edgeworth: Two Forgotten Preachers of the Early Sixteenth Century. Review of English Studies ns 5 (1954): 123–43.
  2. Blench, J. W. Preaching in England in the late Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries: A Study of English Sermons, . Oxford: Basil Blackwell; New York: Barnes and Noble, . 20–28.
  3. Feingold, Mordechai. John Longland. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 2: 341–42. [Check Bibliography.]
  4. Bowker, Margaret. Longland, John (1473–1547). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [Jan 2008]. ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/16986)

Thomas Lupset (c1498–27 December 1530)

Editions

Add STC, Shaefer M218, etc. and Bude's Letter to Lupset (1517 Utopia).

  1. Gee, J. A. The Life and Works of Thomas Lupset, with a Critical Text of the Original Treatises and Letters. New Haven: Yale UP, 1928.
    Review:
    1. R. W. Chambers, Modern Language Review 26 (1931): 467–68.

Selections

  1. Nugent, E. M., ed. An Exhortation to Young Men. By Thomas Lupset. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 79–88.

Studies

For short bios. see Allen #270***; and note to Rogers #66/1, p.125

  1. From John Leland's Epigrammata (1589). John Leland, Epigrammata (printed 1589), edited by Dana Sutton, online at http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/lelandpoems/ See XXVII, See XXXIV, and XCIV on Thomas Lupset. (See also CXXXIV on Nicholas Wilson.)
  2. Beaty, Nancy Lee. The Waye of Dyenge Well: A Humanistic Crafte. The Craft of Dying: A Study in the Literary Tradition of the Ars moriendi in England. Yale Studies in English 175. New Haven: Yale UP, 1970. 54–107. [A study of Lupset's The Waye of Dyenge Well (1534).]
    Review:
    1. J. X. Evans, Moreana 39 (1973): 43–45.
  3. McConica, James. Thomas Lupset of London, c. 1498–27 December 1530. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 2: 357–59. [Include Bibliography.]
  4. Haynes, Robert W. Thomas Lupset's A Treatise of Charitie: Dialogue as Charity in Action. Renaissance Papers 1990: 19–26.
  5. Mayer, T. F. Lupset, Thomas (c.1495–1530). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online [Jan 2008] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/17201)
  6. Arnold, Jonathan A. The English Erasmians: Thomas Linacre, Thomas Grocyn and Thomas Lupset. The Great Humanists: An Introduction. London: I. B. Tauris. 2011. 199–201, 204–206, 288–89.
  7. Appleford, Amy. The Exercise of Death in Henrician England. Learning to Die in London, 1380-1540. The Middle Ages Series. Philadelphia, PA: U of Pennsylvania P, 2014. 186–188, 205–214. [Also includes brief mention of More (214–16).]

Add CE 2:357-59, McConica English Humanists and ODNB.

Dominic Mancini's De occupatione (1483)

Texts

  1. Bibliotheque Municipale, Lille, France, MS Godefroy 129. [Manuscript of Dominic Mancini's De Usurpatio. For description, see Armstrong 1984, pp.50–54.]
  2. Mancini, Dominic. The Usurpation of Richard the Third: Dominicus Mancinus ad Angelum Catonem de occupatione regni anglie per Riccardum Tercium libellus. Ed. and trans. C. A. J. Armstrong. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1936. 2nd. ed. 1969. Rpt. Gloucester: Allan Sutton, 1984, 1989. [Summ.: Geritz Q002; Sullivan S2:6 (Check also Original Sullivan Index).]

Studies

  1. Armstrong, C. A. J. Introduction. The Usurpation of Richard the Third: Dominicus Mancinus ad Angelum Catonem de occupatione regni anglie per Riccardum Tercium libellus. Ed. and trans. C. A. J. Armstrong. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1936. 2nd. ed. 1969. Rpt. Gloucester: Alan Sutton, 1984, 1989. 1–54.
  2. Hanham, A. Mancini, the Unsuspected Eye-Witness. Richard III and His Early Historians. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1975. 65–73.
  3. Gransden, A. Chroniclers of the Wars of the Roses: Foreign. Historical Writing in England ii, c. 1307 to the Early Sixteenth Century. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982. 300–307.
  4. Potter, Jeremy. Good King Richard? An Account of Richard III and his Reputation 1483—1983. London: Constable, 1983, rpt. 1985. 1989. 81–86.
  5. Horrox, Rosemary. The Usurpation. Richard III: A Study in Service. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought, Fourth Series 11. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1989. 89–137.
  6. Visser-Fuchs, Livia. Mancini, Domenico (b. before 1434, d. 1494x1514). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online [2004]. (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/50257)

Margaret of York, Duchess of Burgundy (1446–1503)

See also Wikipedia entry for Margaret of York.

  1. Hommel, Luc. Marguerite d'York, ou, La duchesse Junon Paris: Hachette, 1959. Rpt. 2003.
  2. Weightman, Christine. Margaret of York: Duchess of Burgundy 1446–1503. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1989. Revised edition as Margaret of York: The Diabolical Duchess. Stroud, Gloustershire: Amberley Publishing, 2009.
    Review:
    1. D. A. Penny, Sixteenth Century Journal 21 (1990): 511–12.
  3. Jones, Michael. Margaret, duchess of Burgundy (1446–1503). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/18051) [Includes bibliography.]
  4. Dagmar Eichberger, ed. Women of distinction: Margaret of York, Margaret of Austria. Davidsfonds: Brepols, 2005. [Exhibition catalogue.]
  5. Dagmar Eichberger, Anne-Marie Legaré, and Wim N M Hüsken, eds. Women at the Burgundian Court: presence and influence = Femmes à la cour de Bourgogne : présence et influence. Burgundica, 17. Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2010. [Conference Proceedings; companion to Women of Distinction.]

Sir Richard Moryson (Morison, Morrison) (d. 17 March 1556)

Editions

  1. Morison, Richard. An inuective ayenste treason. London: T. Bertheleti, 1539. Rpt. (The English Experience 477) Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1972. [STC 18111***; ESTC ***.]
  2. Morison, Richard. An exhortation to stryre all Englyshe men to the defence of theyr countreye. London: T. Bertheleti, 1539. Rpt. (The English Experience 476) Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1972. [STC 18110***; ESTC ***.]
  3. Berkowitz, D. S., ed. Humanist Scholarship and Public Order: Two Tracts against the Pilgrimage of Grace. By Sir Richard Morison. With Historical Annotations and Related Contemporary Documents. Washington, DC: The Folger Shakespeare Library; London: Associated University Presses, 1984.
  4. Morison, Richard, trans. Vives' Introduction to to Wisdom. Ed. M. L. Tobriner. Classics in Education 35. New York: Teachers College Press, Columbia U., 1968. [Richard Morrison's 1540 English translation, amended and with an introduction by Tobriner.]

Studies

  1. Baskervill, C. R. Sir Richard Morison as the Author of Two Anonymous Tracts on Sedition. The Library 4th ser. 17 (1936): 83–87.
  2. Zeeveld, W. G. Richard Morison, Official Apologist for Henry VIII. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 55 (1940): 406–25.
  3. Slavin, Arthur J. Tis far off, And rather like a dream: Common Weal, Common Woe and Commonwealth. [1988] See Utopian Communism, Justice, Law, Property and Prosperity.
  4. Zeeveld, W. G. Apology for an Execution. [1967/1977] See The Immediate Aftermath of More's Death.
  5. Mueller, Janel M. Schematism and Scripturalism in Morison and Cheke. The Native Tongue and the Word: Developments in English Prose Style 1380–1580. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1984. 203–221.
  6. Tracey Sowerby Renaissance and Reform in Tudor England: The Careers of Sir Richard Morison. Oxford Historical Monographs. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010.

Cardinal John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury (c1420–1500)

See also Salvador Miranda, John Morton, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church; online at http://www2.fiu.edu/~mirandas/bios1493.htm#Morton.

  1. Campbell, Lord John. Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal, From the Earliest Times till the Reign of George IV. First Series to the Revolution of 1688. In Three Volumes. 3+ vols. London: John Murray, 1845, 1846, etc. Vol. 1: 415–427. 1846 edition online at https://archive.org/details/livesoflordchan01camp. [cf. Sullivan 1: 155–56. Title varies in later editions, with additional volumes added to bring the account up to Queen Victoria's Reign.]
  2. Williams, Robert Folkestone. Lives of the English Cardinals: Including Historical Notices of the Papal Court, From Nicholas Breakspear (Pope Adrian IV) to Thomas Wolsey, Cardinal Legate. 2 Vols. London: Wm. H. Allen, 1868. Vol. II:152–192. Online at https://archive.org/details/englishcardinals02willuoft.
  3. Woodhouse, Reginald Illingworth. The Life of John Morton. London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1895. Online at https://archive.org/details/lifejohnmortona00woodgoog
  4. Gairdner, J. Archbishop Morton and St. Albans. English Historical Review 24 (1909): 91–96, 319–21.
  5. Jenkins, Claude. Cardinal Morton's Register. Tudor Studies Presented... to Albert Frederick Pollard. Ed. R. W. Seton-Watson. London: Longmans Green & Co., 1924. 26–74.
  6. Schoeck, R. J. More, the Devil, and Cardinal Morton: A Note on 16th-Century Name Devices. [1954] See More, Miscellaneous Background: On More's Name, Coat of Arms, etc.
  7. Davis, J. C. More, Morton, and the Politics of Accommodation. [1970] See Utopia: Book One, Europe, the 'Dialogue of Counsel,' and Reform.
  8. Harper-Bill. Christopher. Archbishop John Morton and the Province of Canterbury, 1486–1500. Journal of Eccesiastical History 29 (1978): 1–21.
  9. Harper-Bill. Christopher. The Familia, Administrators and Patronage of Archbishop Morton. Journal of Religious History 10 (1978/79): 236–52.
  10. Schoeck, R. J. John Morton (c1420–15 September 1500). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz, and T. B. Beutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. Vol. 2: 465.
  11. Davies, C. S. L. Bishop John Morton, the Holy See, and the Accession of Henry VII. English Historical Review 102 (1987): 2–31.
  12. The register of John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1486–1500. Edited by Christopher Harper-Bill. Canterbury and York Society, 75, 78, 89. 3 vols. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 1987, 1991, 2000.
  13. Harper-Bill, Christopher. Morton, John (d. 1500). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/19363)

Richard Pace (1482–1536?)

Editions

For Pace's continental publications see Shaaber P1–P7 and USTC; And include his translation of Fisher's Sermon against Luther. See also STC.

  1. R. Pace. Plutarchi Cheronaei opuscula: De garrulitate. De avaritia. Quomodo poterit quis ab inimicius aliquid commodi reportare. De modo audiendi. Ex Luciano: Demonactis philosophi vita. Per R. Paceum … versa (1522).
  2. Pace, Richard. De fructu qui ex doctrina percipitur: The Benefit of a Liberal Education. Ed. and trans. Frank Manley and Richard S. Sylvester. Renaissance Society of America, Renaissance Texts Series 2. New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing Co. for the Renaissance Society of America, 1967.
    Review:
    1. C. Carside, Jr., Moreana 18 (1968): 91–92.
    2. J. B. Trapp, Renaissance Quarterly 21 (1968): 453–55.
  3. (L). Fisher, John. Contio quam anglice habuit . . . [1522] [Translated into Latin by Richard Pace, with a Preface by Nicholas Wilson.] See Fisher: English Sermon Against Luther ().

Studies

For brief bios, see Allen #211*** CWE n. to #211/53, p.141–42; Rogers intro. to #89, p.240.

  1. Wegg, Jarvis. Richard Pace: A Tudor Diplomatist. London: Methuen, 1932.
    Review:
    1. TLS 5 Jan. 1933: 4.
  2. Surtz, Edward. Richard Pace's Sketch of Thomas More. [1958] See More: Other Early Biographers
  3. Frank, and Richard S. Sylvester. Introduction. Richard Pace: De fructu qui ex doctrina percipitur: The Benefit of a Liberal Education. Ed. and trans. Frank Manley and Richard S. Sylvester. Renaissance Society of America, Renaissance Texts Series 2. New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing Co. for the Renaissance Society of America, 1967. ix–xxvi.
  4. Lehmberg, Stanford E. Richard Pace d. 28 June 1536. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 37–39.
  5. Curtis, Cathy. Richard Pace on pedagogy, counsel and satire. PhD diss., University of Cambridge, 1996.
  6. Curtis, Cathy. Richard Pace's De Fructu and Early Tudor Pegagogy. Reassessing Tudor Humanism. Ed. Jonathan Woolfson. Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave MacMillan, 2002. 43–77.
  7. Curtis, Cathy. Pace, Richard (1483?–1536). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online [2004] ( http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/21065)

John Palsgrave (d c12 September 1554)

Texts and Editions

  1. Letter from <John Palsgrave> to Thomas More, [c.Beginning of February 1526]. See Calendar: Rogers #168. [Palsgrave is also mentioned in two of More's Letters to Erasmus in December 1516: Allen #499 and #502.]
  2. Palsgrave, John (attributed). A glasse of the truth. ... Le myrouer de verite. [London]: Imprime a Londres, par Thomas Berthelet, imprimeur du roy, nostre souuerayne Sire. Lan de lincarnation nostre seigneur. 1532. le, 19. iour Octobre. Cum priuilegio, [1532] [STC 11919.5; ESTC S92698. Palsgrave may also have been the author of Le Myrouer de Verite, a translation of A Glasse of the Truth, purported to have been written by Henry VIII (Crittall).]
  3. Palsgrave, John. Lesclarcissement de la langue francoyse compose par maistre Iehan Palsgraue Angloyse natyf de Londres, et gradue de Paris. [London?]: The imprintyng [by Richard Pynson, ca. 1524] fynysshed by Iohan Haukyns the. xviii. daye of July], Anno uerbi incarnati. M.D.XXX [1530] [STC 19166; ESTC S104266. The best French grammar to appear in the 16th Century (Crittall).]
  4. Gnaphaeus, Gulielmus [VVylliam Fullonius]. Joannis Palsgravi Londoniensis, ecphrasis Anglica in comoediam Acolasti. [Impress. Lond.: in aedibus Tho. Berthel[eti] regii impressoris, cum priuilegio ad imprimendum solum], Anno. M.D.XL. [1540] [STC 11470; ESTC S105662. Each scene of the Latin play Acolastus (1529) is translated afterwards into English for students wanting to learn Latin.]
  5. Nugent, E. M., ed. Gullielmus Fullonius. 1493–1568. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 142–51. [Includes Palsgrave's Preface and Acolastus Act V, Scene 2 (Latin and English).]

Studies

  1. Crittall, Elizabeth. John Palsgrave of London, died c 12 September 1554. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 46–47.
  2. Stein, Gabriele. Palsgrave, John (d. 1554). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/21227)

William Parron (Gulielmus Parronus Placentinus) (d. ca.1503)

Three works listed in ESTC; Armstrong also lists some MSS. See also CW 1:10/23–28, nn. on pp.193–94.

  1. Armstrong, C. A. J. An Italian Astrologer at the Court of Henry VII. Italian Renaissance Studies. (A Tribute to the Late Celia M. Ady.) Edited by Ernest Fraser Jacob. London: Faber and Faber: New York: Barnes and Noble, 1960. 433–54. [Sullivan S2:6.]
  2. Carlin, Martha. Parron, William (b. before 1461, d. in or after 1503). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online [Jan. 2009] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/52677)

Henry Patenson (Pattenson, Pattison) (1487/88–26 March 1543)

Henry Patenson, Thomas More's fool, appears in the Holbein More Family Portrait, is mentioned in More's Confutation (CW 8/2: 900/12–901/5 and n. in 8/3:1689), and is referred to by later authors, including Stapleton and Ellis Heywood.

  1. Nichols, John Gough. Henry Patenson. Notes and Queries 3rd ser. 11 (1867): 134.
  2. Hall, Noeline. Henry Patenson—Sir Thomas More's Fool. [1990] See More's Family, Friends and Descendents: 16th Century.
  3. Schofield, Roger. Still more things to forget in the wiping of Henry Patenson's bottom in the Exchequer. Moreana 51:195–196 (June 2014): 28–43. [Sum.: pp.28–30. Describes a very strange case from 1524–25 involving Henry Patenson.]

Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury, (1473–1541)

  1. Paul, J. E. The Tragedy of Margaret Pole. Catherine of Aragon and her Friends. London: Burns & Oates, 1966. 232–52. [On Henry's anger at Reginald Pole and the resultant execution of Margaret Pole.]
  2. Pierce, Hazel. Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury, 1473–1541: Loyalty, Lineage and Leadership. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2003.
  3. Pierce, Hazel. Pole, Margaret, suo jure countess of Salisbury (1473–1541), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [May 2015] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/22451) [Includes bibliography.]

For cultural depictions of Margaret Pole, see Wikipedia.

Cardinal Reginald Pole (1500–17 November 1558)

For editions and biographies, see Shaaber P179–P211, USTC, ARCR I:911–924, II:650, CE, ODNB, and ESTC.

Editions and Translations

Add Latin Editions

  1. Quirini, A. M., ed. Epistolae Reginaldi Poli S. R. E. Cardinalis et aliorum ad se collectio. 5 vols. Brescia [Brixiae]: Joannes-Maria Rizzardi, 1744–57. Vol. 1: 1520–1536 Online at http://reader.digitale-sammlungen.de/en/fs1/object/display/bsb11068782_00001.html ***See Google, etc for other volumes.***
  2. Dwyer, J. G., trans. Reginald Pole: Defence of the Unity of the Church. Westminster, MD: Newman Press, 1965.
    Review:
    1. G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 14 (1967): 99–102.
  3. Egretier, N.-M., trans. Reginald Pole: Defense de l'Unité de l'Église. De Pétrarque à Descartes 12. Paris: J. Vrin, 1967.
    Review:
    1. (Diss.) G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 1 (1963): 82.
    2. E. V. Telle, Renaissance Quarterly 21 (1968): 353–55.
  4. Pagano, S. M., and C. Ranieri, ed. Nuovi documenti su Vittoria Colonna e Reginald Pole. Collectanea Archivi Vaticani 24. Vatican City: Archivo Vaticano, 1989.
    Review:
    1. E. G. Gleason, Catholic Historical Review 76 (1990): 851–52.
  5. Meyer, Thomas F. ed. The Correspondence of Reginald Pole. St. Andrews Studies in Reformation History 4 vols. ***: Aldershot: 2002–2008.

Selections

  1. Gibaud, Henri and Marthe Ravaze. Reginald Pole: Le silence de Thomas More. [1983] See More's Trial: Cardinal Pole.
  2. McNabb, V. Cardinal Pole's Eirenikon. Dublin Review 198 (1936): 149–60. Condensed vers. rpt. in An Appeal to the Council of Trent. in The Portable Renaissance Reader Ed. J. B. Ross and M. M. McLaughlin. New York: Viking Press, 1953. 665–72. [A translation of Pole's opening address to the Council of Trent.]
  3. Nugent, E. M., ed. Reginald Pole. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 254–61. [Letters to Henry VIII (July 15th 1536) and Cuthbert Tunstall (1st August 1536).]

See also More's Trial: Cardinal Pole. double check Cardinal Pole in ***Morebib2***.

Early Biographies

  1. Phillips, Thomas. The History of the Life of Reginald Pole. 2 vols. Oxford: William Jackson, 1764, with Appendix 1767. 2nd ed. London : Printed for T. Payne ... W. Johnston ... S. Bladon ... W. Nichol ... W. Flexney ... and J. Almon ..., 1767. Online at (Vol.1) and (Vol.2) Vol. 2 (1767) including Appendix (309–40) available at https://archive.org/details/historyoflifeofr02philuoft [ESTC T87585, etc. and N39667 and T189916. Check out ESTC under Thomas Phillips.]
  2. Beccatelli, Ludovico. The Life of Cardinal Reginald Pole written originally in Italian and now first translated into English with notes critical and historical. To which is added an appendix, setting forth the plagiarisms &c. in Thomas Phillip's Life . . . By . . . Benjamin Pye. Trans. Benjamin Pye. London: Printed and sold by C. Bathurst in Fleet Steet, 1766. Available on Google Books. [ESTC T139568; Sullivan 1:63.]

Modern Biographies

Add CE and ODNB

  1. Stewart, A. M. Life of Cardinal Pole. London: Burns & Oates, 1882.
  2. Lee, Frederick George. Reginald Pole, Cardinal Archbishop of Canterbury: An Historical Sketch With an Introductory Prologue and Practical Epilogue. London: J.C. Nimmo, 1888. Online at https://archive.org/details/reginaldpolecard00leef [Sullivan 2:217.]
  3. Zimmermann, Athanasius. Kardinal Pole, sein Leben und seine Schriften. Ein beitrag zur kirchengeschichte des 16. jahrhunderts. Regensberg, New York: F. Pustet, 1893. Online at https://archive.org/details/kardinalpolesein00zimm
  4. Antony, C.M. The Angelical Cardinal Pole. London: Macdonald and Evan, 1909. Online at https://archive.org/details/theangelicalcard00antouoft [Sullivan I:23.]
  5. Hallé, Marie ?[Pseud. Martin Haile]. Life of Reginald Pole. New York: Longmans, Green & Co., 1910; London: Pitman, 1911. Online at https://archive.org/details/lifeofreginaldpo00hailuoft [Sullivan 2:66.]
  6. Biron, Reginald and Jean Barennes. Réginald Pole, un Prince Anglais, Cardinal Légat au XVIe siècle. Paris: Librairie Générale Catholique Arthur Savaète éditeur, 1922. Online at https://archive.org/details/unprinceanglaisc00biro. [Sullivan 1:82.]
  7. Child, H. Reginald Pole, 1500–1558. The Great Tudors. Ed. K. Garvin. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., 1935. 239–50. Rpt in abr. ed. London: Eyre and Spottiswoode, 1956, 1961. 151–62.
  8. Messenger, E. C. Cardinal Pole, A.D. 1500–1558. Great Catholics. Ed. C. Williamson. London: Nicholson and Watson, 1938. 172–86.
  9. Schenk, Wilhelm Reginald Pole: Cardinal of England. London; New York: Longmans, Green & Co., 1950.
  10. Fuller, Thomas. John Pole. The Worthies of England. (1662). Ed. J. Freeman. London: George Allen & Unwin, 1952. 515–16. [Pole spent so much time with the patricians of Venice that he degenerated into a perfect Italian.]
  11. Williamson, H. R. His Eminence of England: A Play in Two Acts. London: W. Heinemann, 1953.
  12. Fenlon, Dermot. Heresy and Obedience in Tridentine Italy: Cardinal Pole and the Counter-Reformation. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1973.
    Review:
    1. J. K. McConica, Renaissance Quarterly 27 (1974): 62–64.
    2. P. F. Macaluso, Moreana 42 (1974): 81–82.
    3. A. Santasuosso, Renaissance and Reformation os 10 (1974): 139–40.
  13. Simoncelli, P. Il caso Reginald Pole. Eresia e santità nelle polemiche religiose del cinquecento. Rome: Edizioni di Storia e Letteratura, 1977.
  14. Meyer, Thomas F. Reginald Pole, Prince and Prophet. Cambridge: CUP, 1990. Rpt? 2000. Google preview available at Online.
  15. Mayer, Thomas F. Cardinal Pole in European Context: A Via Media in the Reformation. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2000.
  16. John Edwards. Archbishop Pole. The Archbishops of Canterbury Series. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2014.

Studies

  1. Dyke, P. van. Reginald Pole and Thomas Cromwell: An Examination of the Apologia ad Carolum Quintum. American Historical Review 9:4 (1904): 696–724. Rpt. as Appendix in Renascence Portraits. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1905. 377–418.
  2. Routledge, F. J. Six Letters of Cardinal Pole to the Countess of Huntingdon. English Historical Review 28 (1913): 527–31.
  3. Dyke, P. van. The Mission of Cardinal Pole to Enforce the Bull of Deposition against Henry VIII. English Historical Review 37 (1922): 422–23.
  4. Penlock, L. Cardinal Pole and His Friends at Padua. Dublin Review 173: 347 (1923): 210–20.
  5. Wainwright, J. B. Cardinal Pole's Library. Notes and Queries 151 (1926): 209, 247 + 153 (1927): 189.
  6. Gasquet, F. A., Cardinal. Cardinal Pole and his Early Friends. London: G. Bell, 1927. [Sullivan 2:18 and 2:225–26. Translations and paraphrases of the Letters of Nicholas Leonicus to Cardinal Pole and his friends.]
    Review:
    1. TLS 7 Apr. 1927: 242.
  7. Correspondence of Cardinal Pole. British Museum Quarterly 3 (1928/29): 17–18. [On a manuscript copy in the British Library of Pole's letters, written in Italian, from 1549–58.]
  8. Bataillon, Marcel. Damião de Góis et Reginald Pole. O Instituto [Coimbra] 79 (1930): 21–27. Rpt. in Études sur le Portugal au temps de l'humanisme. Coimbra: Por Ordem da Universidade, 1952. 141–47. [On two letters between Pole and Góis.]
  9. Walsh, G. G. Cardinal Pole and the Problem of Christian Unity. Catholic Historical Review 15 (1930): 389–407. [On De Unitate and on Pole's attempts to preserve the unity of the Church.]
  10. Schütt, M. Reginald Poles Vita Longolii. Die englische Biographik de Tudor-Zeit. Hamburg: Friederichsen, de Gruyter & Co., 1930. 53–54.
  11. Garrett, C. H. The Legatine Register of Cardinal Pole, 1554–57. Journal of Modern History 13 (1941): 189–94.
  12. Horton-Smith, L. G. H. George Acworth (c. 1534–c. 1592), Public Orator of Cambridge. Notes and Queries 191 (1946): 90–91, 114–16 + 192 (1947): 58–69 + 195 (1950): 136–37, 178–80, 233–36. [Translation of two letters to Cardinal Pole (1558) and Archbishop Mathew Parker (1560).]
  13. Schenk, W. The Student Days of Cardinal Pole. History 33 (1948): 211–25.
  14. Bühler, C. F. Paulus Manutius and His First Roman Printings. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 46 (1952): 209–14. [On the 1562 editions of two works of Cardinal Pole's by Paolo Manuzio.]
  15. Crehan, J. H. The Return to Obedience: New Judgement on Cardinal Pole. Month ns 14 (1955): 221–29.
  16. Crehan, J. H. St. Ignatius and Cardinal Pole. Archivum Historicum Societatis Iesu 25 (1956): 72–98. [Sum.: (Lat.) on p. 72.]
  17. Trevor-Roper, H. The Crisis of English Humanism: Reginald Pole and His Circle. Men and Events: Historical Essays. New York: Harper and Row, 1957. Rpt. New York: Octagon Books, 1976. 79–84.
  18. Fry, E. J. B. Monsignor of England: Cardinal Pole Before His Final Return to England. Dublin Review 232 (1958): 236–45.
  19. Parks, G. B. The Parma Letters and the Dangers to Cardinal Pole. Catholic Historical Review 46 (October 1960): 299–317.
  20. Boland, Edward G. An Appreciation of Cardinal Pole. Unitas 14 (1962): 120–26. [CUP Microfilms, ser. 4, vol. 11.]
  21. Idigoras, J. I. Tellechea, Pole y Paulo IV: Una celebre Apologia inedita del Cardenal Ingles (1557). Archivum Historia Pontificiae 4 (1966): 105–54.
  22. Jedin, H. Kardinal Pole und Vittoria Colonna. In Kirche des Glaubens, Kirche der Geschichte [Freiburg: 1966], 1: 181–94.
  23. Anderson, M. W. Trent and Justification (1546): A Protestant Reflection. Scottish Journal Of Theology 21 (1968): 385–406.
  24. Blond, Georges. Le Cardinal Reginald Pole et l'unité de l'église. Moreana 17 (1968): 33–46.
  25. Steinmetz, D. C. Reginald Pole (1500–1558): The Loss of Eden. Reformers in the Wings. Philadelphia: Fortress P, 1971. 53–65.
  26. Bühler, C. F. Observations on the 1562 Editions of Cardinal Reginald Pole's De concilio and Reformatio Angliae. University of Virginia Studies in Bibliography 26 (1973): 232–34.
  27. Parks, G. B. Did Pole Write the Vita Longolii? Renaissance Quarterly 26 (1973): 274–85.
  28. Pogson, R. H. Revival and Reform in Mary Tudor's Church: A Question of Money. Journal of Ecclesiastical History 25 (1974): 249–66. Rpt. in The English Reformation Revised. Ed. C. Haigh. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1987. 139–56.
  29. Marmion, J. P. Cardinal Pole in Recent Studies. Recusant History 13 (1975/76): 56–61.
  30. Pogson, R. H. Reginald Pole and the Priorities of Government in Mary Tudor's Church. Historical Journal 18 (1975): 3–20.
  31. Dunn, T. F. The Development of the Text of Pole's De Unitate Ecclesiae. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 70 (1976): 455–68.
  32. Parks, G. B. Italian Tributes to Cardinal Pole. Studies in the Continental Background of Renaissance English Literature: Essays Presented to John L. Lievsay. Ed. D. B. J. Randall and G. W. Williams. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1977. 43–66.
  33. Vos, A. The Vita Longolii: Additional Considerations about Reginald Pole's Authorship. Renaissance Quarterly 30 (1977): 324–33. [Continues G. B. Parks' discussion of Pole's authorship in Renaissance Quarterly 26 (1973).]
  34. Loades, D. M. The Restoration of the Old Religion, The Religious Reaction: Pole as Legate, and The English Church under Papal Disfavour. The Reign of Mary Tudor: Politics, Government, and Religion in England, 1553–1558. London: Ernest Benn, 1979. 148–82, 321–64, 428–57.
  35. Pastore, A. Due biblioteche umanistiche del Cinquecento: I libri del Cardinal Pole e di Marcantonio Flaminio. Rinascimento 2nd ser. 19 (1979): 269–90.
  36. Pogson, R. H. The Legacy of the Schism: Confusion, Continuity and Change in the Marian Clergy. in The Mid-Tudor Polity, c.1540–1560. Ed. J. Loach and R. Tittler. London: MacMillan P, 1980. 116–36, 193–94, 210–13. [On Pole's and Mary's revival of the Catholic clergy.]
  37. Donaldson, P. S. Machiavelli, Antichrist, and the Reformation: Prophetic Typology in Reginald Pole's De Unitate and Apologia ad Carolum Quintum. Leaders of the Reformation. Ed. R. L. DeMolen. Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses; Selinsgrove: Susquehanna UP, 1984. 211–46. Rev. vers. rpt. as Machiavelli and Antichrist: Prophetic Typology in Reginald Pole's De Unitate and Apologia ad Carolum Quintum. in Machiavelli and Mystery of State. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1988. 1–35.
    Review:
    1. Thomas F. Mayer, Sixteenth Century Journal 21 (1990):108–09.
  38. Herman, J. S. von, Eine ökumenische Auslegung von Apg 15 in der Reformationszeit: Reginald Poles De concilio. Theologie und Philosophie 60 (1985): 16–42.
  39. Mayer, Thomas F. Reginald Pole in Paolo Giovio's Descriptio: A Strategy for Reconversion. Sixteenth Century Journal 16:4 (1985): 431–50.
  40. Mayer, Thomas F. A Diet for Henry VIII: The Failure of Reginald Pole's 1537 Legation. Journal of British Studies 26:3 (1987): 305–31.
  41. Mayer, Thomas F. A Mission Worse Than Death: Reginald Pole and the Paris Theologians. English Historical Review 103 (1988): 870–91.
  42. Mayer, Thomas F. If Martyrs are to be Exchanged with Martyrs: The Kidnappings of William Tyndale and Reginald Pole. Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte 81 (1990): 286–308. [Sum.: (Ger.) pp. 307–8.]
  43. Egretier, Noëlle-Marie. Signification historique et valeur littéraire du De unitate de Reginald Pole. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Torontonensis. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies: Toronto, 8 August to 13 August 1988. Ed. Alexander Dalzell, Charles Fantazzi, Richard J. Schoeck. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 86. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1991. 301–305.
  44. Meyer, Thomas F., and Daniel R. Woolf, eds. The rhetorics of life-writing in early modern Europe: forms of biography from Cassandra Fedele to Louis XIV. Studies in medieval and early modern civilization. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1995. [Check this out: Chapters on Pole, Thomas Elyot and others? UofA CT 21 R52 1995]
  45. Mayer, Thomas F. Heretics be not in all things heretics: Cardinal Pole, His Circle, and the Potential for Toleration. Beyond the Persecuting Society: Religious Toleration Before the Enlightenment. Ed. by John Christian Laursen and Cary J. Nederman. Philadelphia: U of Pennsylvania P, 1998. 107–124.
  46. Meyer, Thomas F. A Reluctant Author: Cardinal Pole and his Manuscripts. Transactions of the American Philosophical Society Volume 89 (1999), Issues 1–4. Available as Google eBook
  47. Meyer, Thomas F. Becket's Bones Burnt! Cardinal Pole and the Invention and Dissemination of an Atrocity. Martyrs and Martyrdom in England, c.1400–1700. Ed. Thomas S. Freeman and Thomas Fredrick Meyer. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2007. 126–143.
  48. Overell, Anne. Pier Paolo Vergerio and Cardinal Pole. Italian Reform and English Reformations, c.1535–c.1585. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2008. 145–166. `
  49. Duffy, Eamon. Archbishop Cranmer and Cardinal Pole: the See of Canterbury and the Reformation. Saints, Sacrilege, Sedition: Religion and Conflict in the Tudor Reformations. London: Bloomsbury, 2012. 179–194, 282–85.
  50. Overell, M. Anne, and James M. W. Willoughby. Books from the Circle of Cardinal Pole: The Italian Library of Michael Throckmorton. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 75 (2012): 111–140.

For Thomas Starkey's A Dialogue between Cardinal Pole and Thomas Lupset, see Thomas Starkey. For Pole's account of More's (and Fisher's) death, see More's Imprisonment and Trial: Cardinal Pole.

Sir Edward Poynings (Ponynges, Poyninges) (1459–22 October 1521

  1. Steven G. Ellis. Poynings, Sir Edward (1459–1521). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online [2004] ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/22683)

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Poynings.

Richard Pynson (c.1449–1529/30)

Useful bibliography under Wikipedia entry; see also Moreana 176 (2009) article.

  1. Lathrop, H. B. The First English Printers and their Patrons. Library 4th ser. 3 (1922): 69–96.
  2. Plomer, Henry Robert. Richard Pynson: Glover and Printer. Library 4th ser. 3 (1923): 49–51.
  3. Plomer, Henry Robert. [Chapter on Richard Pynson]. Wynkyn de Worde and his Contemporaries from the Death of Caxton to 1535: A Chapter in English Printing. London: Grafton and Co., 1925. ***–***. Rpt. [Folkestone, Eng.] Dawson [1974].
  4. Johnston, Stanley Howard. A Study of the Career and Literary Publications of Richard Pynson. Ph.D. Diss. University of Western Ontario, 1977.
  5. Schoeck, Richard. Richard Pynson, died c . Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. Peter G. Bietenholz and Thomas B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, . 3: 124–25.
  6. Neville, Pamela. Richard Pynson, King's Printer (1506–1529): Printing and Propaganda in Early Tudor England. Ph.D. Diss. University of London, 1990.
  7. Neville-Sington, Pamela. Richard Pynson (c.1449–1529/30). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online [2004] ( http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/22935)
  8. Vanautgaerden, Alexandre. Érasme chez Richard Pynson (1513), imprimeur du Roi à Londres. Moreana 46:176 (2009): 191–213. [Sum.: pp.191–192.]

John Rastell (1475–1536)

Editions and Excerpts

  1. Rastell, John. An exposition of certaine difficult and obscure wordes and termes of the lawes of this realme. London: R. Tottell, 1579. Rpt. (The English Experience 210) Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1969. [Rpt. of STC 20707. 3rd Edition. 1st edition published in French in 1527 with title Expositiones terminorum legorum Anglorum.]
  2. Ellis, Sir Henry, ed. Original Letters Illustrative of English History. Third Series. 2 vols. London: Richard Bentley, 1846. 2: no. 229 (pp. 308–12). [Letter of Rastell to Thomas Cromwell.]
  3. Nugent, Elizabeth M., ed. John Rastell. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 167–78, 503–509. [Extracts from Rastell's law books and The Pastime of People.]
  4. Graham, H. J., ed. John Rastell's Proheme (1519) on English Law and Law in English. UCLA Law Review 13 (1965/66): 97–98. Also edited by E. M. Nugent. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 173–76. [Appendix II to Our Maternal Tong (see Studies).]
  5. Axton, Richard, ed. John Rastell: Three Rastall Plays: Four Elements, Calisto and Melebea, Gentleness and Nobility. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer; Totowa, NJ: Rowman and Littlefield, 1979.
  6. Geritz, Albert J., ed. The Pastyme of People and A New Boke of Purgatory. By John Rastell. New York: Garland, 1985.
    Review:
    1. G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 109 (1992): 67–73.

Studies

  1. Reed, Arthur William. John Rastell, Printer, Lawyer, Venturer, Dramatist, and Controversialist. Early Tudor Drama: Medwall, the Rastells, Heywood, and the More Circle. London: Methuen, 1926; rpt. New York: Octagon Books, 1969. 1–28.
  2. Borish, M. E. Source and Intention of The Four Elements. Studies in Philology 35 (1938): 149–63.
  3. Parks, George B. The Geography of the Interlude of the Four Elements. Philological Quarterly 17 (1938): 251–62.
  4. Nugent, Elizabeth M. Sources of John Rastell's The Nature of the Four Elements. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 57 (1942): 74–88.
  5. Parks, George B. Rastell and Waldseemuller's Map. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 58 (1943):572–74.
  6. Parr, Johnstone. More Sources of Rastell's Interlude of the Four Elements. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 60 (1945): 48–58.
  7. Parr, Johnstone. John Rastell's Geographical Knowledge of America. Philological Quarterly 27 (1948): 229–40.
  8. Graham, H. J. The Rastells and the Printed English Law Book of the Renaissance. Law Library Journal 47 (1954): 6–25. [On John and William Rastell as Law Printers.]
  9. Graham, H. J., and J. W. Heckel. The Book that Made the Common Law: The First Printing of Fitzherbert's La Graunde Abridgement, 1514–1516. Law Library Journal 51 (1958): 100–116. [John Rastell printed the first Volume; Pynson and de Worde the second & third volumes.]
  10. Graham, H. J. Our Tong Maternall Maruellously Amendyd and Augmentyd: The First Englishing and Printing of the Medieval Statutes at Large, 1530–1533. UCLA Law Review 13 (1965/66): 58–98. [The Greate Boke of the Statutes was first published in 1530–33, not 1543 as previously thought, by Robert Pynson, and probably with George Ferrars as translator. Also mentions John Rastell.]
  11. Laine, Amos Lee. John Rastell: An Active Citizen of the English Commonwealth. Diss. Duke U, 1972. [Summ.: Geritz V018.]
  12. Devereux, E. J. John Rastell's Press in the English Reformation. Moreana 49 (1976): 29–47. [Summ.: Geritz V009.]
  13. Devereux, E. J. John Rastell's Text of The Parliament of Fowls. Moreana 51 (1976): 115–20. [On an edition of The Parliament of Fowls, surviving in fragmentary form (STC 5093), published in the early 1520s.]
  14. Devereux, E. J. John Rastell's Utopian Voyage. Moreana 51 (1976): 119–23. [Summ.: Geritz V010.]
  15. Geritz, Albert J. The Dramas and Prose Works of John Rastell. Diss. U of Missouri-Columbia, 1976. [Summ.: Geritz V012.]
  16. Geritz, Albert J. The Marriage Date of John Rastell and Elizabeth More. Moreana 52 (1976): 23–24. [Summ.: Geritz F088.]
  17. Geritz, Albert J. Recent Studies in John Rastell. English Literary Renaissance 8 (1978): 341–50.
  18. Roberts, R. J. John Rastell's Inventory of 1538. The Library 6th ser. 1 (1979): 34–42.
  19. Geritz, Albert J., and Amos Lee Laine. John Rastell. TEAS 363. Boston: Twayne, 1983. [Summ.: Geritz V013.]
    Review:
    1. P. D. Green, Moreana 83/84 (1984): 73–76.
  20. Laine, Amos Lee. John Rastell and the Norman Conquest: Tudor Theories about the Feudal Age. The Rusted Hauberk: Feudal Ideas of Order and Their Decline. Ed. Liam O. Purdon and Cindy L. Vitto. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1994. 299–317.
  21. Geritz, Albert J. John Rastell and the Printing Press. Europa: Wiege des Humanismus und der Reformation. 5 Internationales Symposion der Amici Thomas Mori 20. bis 27. Mai 1995 in Mainz. Dokumentation. Ed. Hermann Boventer and Uwe Baumann. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1997. 245–52.
  22. Devereux, E. J. A Bibliography of John Rastell. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1999. (xvi, 183 pages)
  23. Geritz, Albert. The Relationship of Brothers-in-Law: Thomas More and John Rastell. Moreana 139/140 (1999): 35–48. Online http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana139-140pages35-48.pdf [Sum.: pp.35–36.]

William Rastell (1508–1565)

  1. [William Rastell?] The prynter to the gentle reader, [London, April 1557]. The Workes of Sir Thomas More Knyght . . . [Rastell's Preface to Mary Basset's translation of De Tristitia.] See Calendar of More's Letters.
  2. (E). Dedicatory Letter of William Rastell to Queen Mary, [London, April 1557]. The Workes of Sir Thomas More Knyght . . . See Calendar of More's Letters.
  3. Reed, Arthur William. The Editor of Sir Thomas More's English Works: William Rastell. [1923] See William Rastell's 1557 Edition
  4. Reed, Arthur William. The Printer of Heywood's Plays: William Rastell. Early Tudor Drama: Medwall, the Rastells, Heywood, and the More Circle. London: Methuen, 1926; rpt. New York: Octagon Books, 1969. 72–93.
  5. Reed, Arthur William. William Rastell and More's English Works. [1531] See William Rastell's 1557 Edition
  6. Schoeck, Richard J. William Rastell and the Prothonotaries: A Link in the Story of the Rastells, Ropers, and Heywoods. Notes and Queries 197 (1952): 398–99. [Geritz V047.]
  7. Baker, J. H. Rastell, William (1508–1565). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [May 2008] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/23151)

See also Thomas More: William Rastell's 1557 Edition and Other Early Editions and John Fisher: The Rastell Fragments.

William Roper (1496–1575) and Family

  1. Hogrefe, Pearl. Sir Thomas More's Connection with the Roper Family. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 47 (1932): 523–33. [Wentworth 76; Sullivan 2:114. Mainly on John Roper, Sir John More, and Thomas More.]
  2. Buckingham, Christopher. Sicklied o'er with the pale Cast of Thought: The Ropers of Eltham. London Recusant 5:2 (1975): 60–65. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 52 (1976): 110.]
  3. Tatton-Brown, T. The Roper chantry in St. Dunstan's Church, Canterbury. Antiquaries Journal 60 (1980): 227–46.
  4. Schoeck, R. J. William Roper (c.1496–4 January 1578). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz, and T. B. Beutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. Vol. 3: 170–71.
  5. Reynolds, E. E. New Catholic Encyclopedia New York: Gale Publishing, Thomson: 1966–79. 12: 665–66.
  6. Trevor-Roper, Hugh. Roper, William (1495/8–1578). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [May 2005] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/24074).
  7. Baker, J. H. Roper, John (d. 1524). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [Jan 2008] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/69370).

See also Thomas More Biographers: William Roper, and Margaret Roper.

King Richard III

Documents

  1. Ellis, Sir Henry, ed. Original Letters Illustrative of English History. Third Series. 2 vols. London: Richard Bentley, 1846. 1: nos. 40–46 (pp. 101–115).
  2. Gairdner, James, ed. Letters and Papers Illustrative of the Reigns of Richard III and Henry VII. 2 vols. Rolls Series. London: Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1: 1861, 2: 1863.
  3. Myers, Alexander Reginald, ed. [Richard III.] English Historical Documents. Vol. IV: 1327–1485. 12 vols. London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1969. 4: nos. 199–213 (pp.328–47). [Excerpts from Crowland, Mancini, The Great Chronicle of London, Rous, Polydore Vergil and other sources.]

Select Bibliography

  1. Markham, Clements R. Richard III: A Doubtful Verdict Reviewed. English Historical Review 6 (1891): 250–283. Rpt. To Prove a Villain: The Case of King Richard III. Ed. by Taylor Littleton and Robert R. Rea. New York: MacMillan Co., 1964. 109–23. [Sullivan 2:285.]
  2. Gairdner, James, and Clements R. Markham. Did Henry VII Murder the Princes? + Richard III and Henry VII. English Historical Review 6 (1891): 444–464 + 806–13 + 813–15. [Sullivan 2:2, 7; 2:286. A reply to Markham's article with a response by Markham, and a rejoinder by Mr. Gairdner.]
  3. Gairdner, James. History of the life and reign of Richard III, to which is added the story of Perkin Warbeck: from original documents. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1898. Online at https://archive.org/details/historyofliferei00gairuoft. [Sullivan 2:5–6.]
  4. Markham, Clements R. Richard III: His Life and Character Reviewed in the Light of Recent Research. London: Smith, Elder and Co., 1906. Available online at https://archive.org/details/cu31924027929540. [Sullivan 2:284–285.]
  5. Myers, Alexander Reginald. The Character of Richard III, + Richard III: A Correspondence. History Today 4 (1954): 511–21 + 709–710. Rpt. To Prove a Villain: The Case of King Richard III. Ed. by Taylor Littleton and Robert R. Rea. New York: MacMillan Co., 1964. 126–32. Rpt. English Society and Government in the Fifteenth Century. Ed. C. M. D. Crowder. Edinburgh: Oliver & Boyd, 1967. 112–33. [Sum.: p.509; Geritz Q041; Wentworth 347.]
  6. Kendall, Paul Murray. Richard III. New York: Norton, 1955. [Geritz Q033; Wentworth 342; Sullivan 2:187–89.]
  7. Wilson, J. Dover. A Note on Richard III: The Bishop of Ely's Strawberries. Modern Lanquage Review 52 (1957): 563–64. Rpt. in To Prove a Villain: The Case of King Richard III. Ed. by Taylor Littleton and Robert R. Rea. New York: MacMillan Co., 1964. 124–25.
  8. Lamb, Vivien B. The Betrayal of Richard III: An Introduction to the Controversy. London: Coram, 1959. Rev. ed. with intro by P. W. Hammond Gloucester: Sutton Publishing, 1997.
  9. Levine, M. Richard III—Usurper or Lawful King? Speculum 34 (1959): 391–401.
  10. Ross, L. J. The Meaning of Strawberries in Shakespeare. Studies in the Renaissance 7 (1960): 225–40.
  11. Rowse, A. L. Bosworth Field. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1966. [Geritz Q049.]
  12. Kelly, H. A. Canonical Implications of Richard III's Plan to Marry his Niece. Traditio 23 (1967): 269–311.
  13. Myers, Alexander Reginald. Richard III and Historical Tradition. History 53 (1968): 181–202. Rpt. The Historical Association Book of the Tudors Ed. Joel Hurstfield. London: Sidgwick & Jackson, 1973. 14–44. Rpt. Crown, Household and Parliament in Fifteenth Century England. Ed. by Cecil H. Clough, intro. by R. B. Dobson. History Series 46. London: Hambledon P, 1985. 349–370.
  14. Tudor-Craig, Pamela. Richard III, A Descriptive Catalogue of the Exhibition held at the National Portrait Gallery, 27 June–27 October 1973. London, UK: National Portrait Gallery, 1973.
  15. Wood, C. T. The Deposition of Edward V. Traditio 31 (1975): 247–86.
  16. Ross, Charles. Richard III. London: Eyre Methuen; Berkeley: U of California P, 1981. Rpt. Yale English Monarchs. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011. xix–liii. [Geritz Q047; Wentworth 351. The standard historical study of the reign of Richard III.]
    Review:
    1. J. M. W. Bean, Renaissance Quarterly 38 (1985): 710–12.
  17. Potter, Jeremy. More Myth-Making. Good King Richard? An Account of Richard III and his Reputation 1483—1983. Online at http://www.r3.org/bookcase/more/moremyth.html London: Constable, 1983, rpt. 1985. 1989. 110–125 + 192–193 + 239–40. [Geritz Q045; Wentworth 349.]
  18. Bennett, M. The Battle of Bosworth. Gloucester: Alan Sutton, c1985.
  19. Leslau, Jack. The Princes in the Tower. Moreana 98/99 (1988): 17–36. [Geritz Q038. Leslau rather fancifully argues that the princes were not murdered, but continued to live under assumed names. He further identifies John Clement as Richard, Duke of York.]
  20. Horrox, Rosemary. Richard III: A Study in Service. Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought, Fourth Series 11. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1989.
  21. Pollard, A. F. Richard III and the Princes in the Tower. New York: St. Martin's, 1991. [Geritz Q044.]
  22. Hicks, Michael. Richard III: The Man Behind the Myth. London: Collins & Brown, 2001.
  23. Hicks, Michael. Richard III. English Monarchs. Stroud: Tempus Books, 2001.
  24. Hicks, Michael. The Family of Richard III. Stroud: Amberley Publishing, 2015.

Add more recent bibliography. Add ODNB.

The Deformity of Richard III

  1. Rhodes, P. Physical Deformity of Richard III. British Medical Journal 24 Dec. 1977: 1650–52 + 3 letters by B. Wolman, O. T. Mansfield, and G. Dale. British Medical Journal 28 Jan. 1978: 234–35. [Suggests various possible diagnoses for Richard's condition.]
  2. Aird, C., and R. A. C. McIntosh. Shakespeare's Richard III and the Ellis-Van Creveld Syndrome. The Practitioner 220 (April 1978): 656–62 + 1 plate. [Identifies Richard's deformity with a rare condition first discovered in 1940.]
  3. Jones, Emyr Wyn. Richard III's Disfigurement: A Medical Postscript. Folklore 91 (1980): 211–27. [Summ.: Geritz Q032. Minimizes the degree of Richard's deformity. On the folklore traditions of natal teeth.]

Defences of Richard III: Cornwallis, Buck and Walpole

This section needs to be readited.

  1. Buck, George (see Sullivan 1:137–138).
  2. Walpole, Horace. Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of King Richard III. London: J. Dodsley, 2nd ed. 1768. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/historicdoubtso00dodsgoog [ESTC T145482.]
  3. Masters, Robert. Some Remarks on Mr. Walpole's Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of King Richard the Third. London : printed by W. Bowyer and J. Nichols, 1772. 20p. Rpt. in Archaeologia, or Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to Antiquity 2:2 (1809):198–215. Online at https://books.google.ca/books?id=3gMwAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA198. [ESTC T49367; Sullivan 2:294–95.]
  4. Buck, George, Sir. The History of King Richard the Third (1619). Ed. Arthur Noel Kincaid. Gloucester: Alan Sutton, 1979. Rev. ed. 1982.
    Review(s):
    1. Alison Hanham, Moreana 70 (1981): 73–76.
  5. Condren, Conal. Cornwallis' Paradoxical Defence of Richard III: A Machiavellian Discourse on Morean Mythology? Online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana94pages5-24.pdf Moreana 94 (1987): 5–24. [Geritz Q008.]
  6. Cornwallis, William, Sir. The Encomium of Richard III. Ed. Arthur Noel Kincaid. Intro. J. A. Ramsden and Arthur Noel Kincaid. London: Turner & Devereux, 1977.
  7. Cornwallis, William, Sir. From The Praise of King Richard the Third. To Prove a Villain: The Case of King Richard III. Ed. by Taylor Littleton and Robert R. Rea. New York: MacMillan Co., 1964. 78–82. [A substantial extract.]
  8. Kincaid, Arthur Noel. Sir Edward Hoby and K. Richard: Shakespeare Play or Morton Tract? Notes and Queries ns 28 (1981): 124–26. [Hoby showed Cecil a manuscript by Morton on Richard III, not a performance of Shakespeare's Richard II. On Hoby's relationships with George Buck, and on Cornwallis' Encomium.]
  9. Walpole, Horace. Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of King Richard III. Richard III, The Great Debate: Sir Thomas More's History of King Richard III and Horace Walpole's Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of King Richard III. Ed. P. M. Kendall. New York: Norton, 1965. 147–239. [Geritz Q034; Wentworth 343. General Introduction (5–20) surveys historical treatment of Richard III including the Great Debate.]
  10. Zeeveld, W. Gordon. A Tudor Defense of Richard III. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 55 (1940): 946–57. [Geritz Q064; Wentworth 354. Badly written analysis of Cornwallis' Defense and Buc's History. Claims that Cardinal Morton was the author of More's History.]
  11. Tey, Josephine. [Elizabeth Mackintosh.] The Daughter Of Time. London, P. Davies [1951]; New York: Macmillan, 1952. Available online at https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/t/tey/josephine/daughter_of_time/. [A novel.]
  12. Barlowe, Raleigh Bruce. Saint's Second Season. London: Minerva, 1999. [Worldcat OCLC 43342835. According to Worldcat this is a work of Fiction. Sum.: A treatment of the debate surrounding Richard III, featuring players such as Thomas More, Archbishop Morton, and Brother Bernard. It asks questions such as whether Richard III was an honourable King and what really happened to the princes in the Tower.]

Individual Authors and Works

Antony Woodville, Lord Rivers (c. 1440–25 June 1483)

check ODNB.

  1. Ives, E. W. Andrew Dimnock and the Papers of Antony Earl Rivers, 1482–83. Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 41 (1968): 216–29.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Woodville,_2nd_Earl_Rivers.

Margaret More Roper (1505–1544)

See More: Margaret Roper.

John Rous (d.1492)

Editions

  1. Hearne, Thomas, ed. Joannis Rossi Antiquarii Warwicensis Historia regum Angliae. Oxford: e Theatro sheldoniano, 1716. 2nd ed. 1745. 212–218. 1745 edition online at https://archive.org/details/joannisrossiant00rousgoog [ESTC ***, ***; L'Univers 76n2. For an English translation of John Rous's account of Richard III, see A. Hanham Richard III and his early Historians, pp.118–124.]
  2. Rous, John. This rol was laburd & finished by Master John Rows of Warrewyk . Intro. by William Courthope. London: W. Pickering, 1845, 1859. 1845 edition online as https://archive.org/details/thisrolwaslaburd00rousrich Rpt. as The Rous Roll. With historical intro. by Charles D. Ross. Gloucester, UK: Sutton, 1980.

Studies

  1. Russell, A. G. B. The Rous Roll. Burlington Magazine 30 (1917): 23–31.
  2. Wright, C. E. The Rous Roll: The English Version. British Museum Quarterly 20:3 (1956): 77–81 + 2 plates after p.96.
  3. Hanham, A. John Rous's Account of the Reign of Richard III. Richard III and His Early Historians. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1975. 104–07, 118–24. [Translation of Rous's account of Richard on pp.118-124.]
  4. Gransden, A. The Antiquaries: John Rous and William Worcester. Historical Writing in England ii, c. 1307 to the Early Sixteenth Century. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1982. 308–41.
  5. Lowry, M. John Rous and the Survival of the Neville Circle. Viator 19 (1988): 327–38.
  6. Orme, Nicholas. Rous, John (c.1420–1492). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online [2004]. (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/24173) [Include bibliography and MS.]

Thomas Ruthall, of Cirencester (d. 4 February 1523)

Both Thomas More (Rogers #5, cf. also #89) and Erasmus (EE 192, 325) dedicated works to Ruthall. For a brief biography, see introduction to Allen 1:#192, p.423; introduction to Rogers #5, p.10 and CW 3/1, p.138.

  1. Letter of Thomas More to Thomas Ruthall, [London, 1506]. See Thomas More Calendar: Thomas More to Thomas Ruthall.
  2. Crittall, Elizabeth. Thomas Ruthall, of Cirencester. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 179–80.
  3. Johnson, Margot. Ruthall, Thomas (d. 1523), Bishop of Durham. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [2008] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/24359).

Prior William Sellyng (Selling) (c.1430–1494))

  1. Einstein, Lewis. The Italian Renaissance in England. Columbia University Studies in Comparative Literature. New York: Columbia UP, 1902. Rpt. 1913, 1927. 29–30. Online at https://archive.org/details/cu31924027958192
  2. Weiss, Roberto. John Shirwood and Prior Sellyng. Humanism in England During the Fifteenth Century. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 3rd ed. 1967. 149–59, 198–99.
  3. Bennett, J. P. John Morer's Will: Thomas Linacre and Prior Sellyng's Greek Teaching. [1968] See Thomas Linacre.
  4. Clough, Cecil H. Selling , William (c.1430–1494). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4991).

Elizabeth [Jane] Shore (d. 1526/1527?)

  1. Thomas More. [Character of Jane Shore.] History of Richard III/Historia Richard Tertii CW 2:54/13–57/13 = CW 15:424/1–430/14. [More's Portrait or Character of Jane [actually Elizabeth] Shore, based on Classical models, in a very real sense founded her reputation.]
  2. Thompson, C.J.S. The Witchery of Jane Shore, the Rose of London. The Romance of a Royal Mistress. London: Grayson & Grayson, 1933. Rpt. Whitefish: Kessinger, 2003. [A detailed and well-illustrated historical and scholarly biography of the favourite mistress of Tudor King Edward IV, the first monarch of the house of York to ascend the English throne. Part One: Jane Shore in History and Romance. Part Two: Jane Shore in Poetry and Drama.]
  3. Rowan, D. F. Shore's Wife. Studies in English Literature 6 (1966): 447–64. [Geritz Q048.]
  4. Pratt, S. M. Jane Shore and the Elizabethans: Some Facts and Speculations. Texas Studies in Language and Literature 11 (1970): 1293–1306.
  5. Barker, Nicolas, and Sir Robert Birley. The Story of Jane Shore. Etoniana nos. 125/126 (June 4 and Dec. 2, 1972): 383–414. Comprised of two articles?: (a) N. Barker, The Real Jane Shore, 125:383–91 + 126:410–414; (b) R. Birley, Jane Shore in Literature, 125:391–97 + 126:399–407.
  6. Brown, Barbara. Sir Thomas More and Thomas Churchyard's Shore's Wife. [1972] See Richard III: Shore's Wife and Later Influence.
  7. Beith-Halahmi, Esther Yael. Angel Fayre or Strumpet Lewd: Jane Shore as an Example of Erring Beauty in Sixteeth-Century Literature. 2 vols. Salzburg Studies in English Literature. Elizabethan & Renaissance Studies, 26–27. Salzburg: Universität Salzburg, Institut für Englische Sprache und Literatur, 1974. 6–59. [Sum.: G. M. Moreana 52 (1976): 135–36; Geritz Q003; Wentworth 324.]
  8. Harner, James L. The Wofull Lamentation of Mistris Jane Shore: The Popularity of an Elizabethan Ballad. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 71 (1977): 137–49.
  9. Harner, James L. Jane Shore in Literature: A Checklist. Notes and Queries ns 28 (1981): 496–507.
  10. Cornell, Christine Anne. Unparadised Women: Royal Mistresses in Early Modern Literature. Diss. Dalhousie U, 1994. [Geritz Q009. Includes discussion of More's and Churchyard's treatment of Jane Shore.]
  11. Brown, Richard Danson. A Talkative Wench (Whose Words a World Hath Delighted In): Mistress Shore and Elizabethan Complaint. Review of English Studies 49:196 (1998): 395–415.
  12. Horrox, Rosemary. Shore [née Lambert], Elizabeth [Jane] (d. 1526/7?) Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/25451) [Includes bibliography.]
  13. Scott, Maria M. Re-Presenting Jane Shore: Harlot and Heroine. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate, 2005.

For popular treatments of Mistress Shore in poetry, drama, television, film, and fiction, see Wikipedia entry for Jane Shore.

John Skelton and Humanism (c1460–21 June 1529)

This is not meant to be a complete bibliography of Skelton, but only deals with his neo-latin poetry and his relationships to English Humanism and Thomas More.

Add ODNB.

Editions

  1. Carlson, David R., ed. The Latin Writings of John Skelton. Studies in Philology Texts and Studies Series. Studies in Philology 88:4 (1991): 1–125.

Studies

  1. Nelson, William. The Scholars of Henry VII. John Skelton Laureate. Columbia University Studies in English and Comparative Literature 139. New York: Columbia UP, 1939. Rpt. New York: Russell & Russell, 1964. 4–39. [On humanist scholars at the court of Henry VII, especially Pietro Carmeliano, Bernard André, Silvestro Gigli, etc., and their relationship to the More Circle.]
  2. Harris, William O. Wolsey and Skelton's Magnyfycence: A Re-evaluation. Studies in Philology 57 (1960): 99–122.
  3. Pollet, Maurice. John Skelton: Poet of Tudor England Trans. John Warrington. London: J.M. Dent and Sons; Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell UP, 1971.
  4. Marc'hadour, Germain. Croisade triomphale de l'Angleterre. [1972] See More: Latin Epigrams.
  5. Tucker, Melvin J. Skelton's More-Howard Connections. With a reply by Maurice Pollet. Moreana 37 (1973): 15–23 + 38 (1973): 97–98. [Geritz F333. A review article of Pollet's book, John Skelton: Poet of Tudor England (1971).]
  6. Kozikowski, Stanley J. Lydgate, Machiavelli, More and Skelton's Bowge of Courte. [1977] See More: Latin Epigrams.
  7. McLane, Paul E. Prince Lucifer and the Fitful Lanternes of Lyght: Wolsey and the Bishops in Skelton's Colyn Cloute. Huntington Library Quarterly 43 (1980): 159–49.
  8. Schoeck, R.J. and Thomas B. Deutcher. John Skelton (c. 1460–21 June 1529). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 257–58. [Include bibliography.]
  9. Walker, Greg. John Skelton and the Politics of the 1520s. Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1988. [Geritz F337.]
    Review:
    1. M. V. C. Alexander, Albion 21 (1989): 295–97.
    2. A. Fox, Catholic Historical Review 75 (1989): 701–03.
    3. S. J. Gunn, Journal of Ecclesiastical History 40 (1989): 427–28.
    4. W. T. Walker, Sixteenth Century Journal 21 (1990): 142.
  10. Scattergood, John. Skelton and Heresy. [1989] See More: Dialogue Concerning Heresies.
  11. Walker, Greg. John Skelton, Thomas More, and the Lost History of the Early Reformation in England. [1991/1996] See More: Dialogue Concerning Heresies.
  12. Lüsse, Beate. Panegyric Poetry on the Coronation of Henry VIII: The King's Praise and the Poet's Self-Presentation. [1992] See More: Latin Epigrams.
  13. Rundle, David. A New Golden Age? More, Skelton and the accession verses of 1509. [1995] See Thomas More: Latin Epigrams

Walter Smith (Smyth) (fl. 1525)

  1. Smyth (Smith), Walter. The wydow Edyth .xii. mery gestys of one callyd Edyth the lyeng wydow whych yet styll lyueth. Enprynted at London : [by Iohannes Rastell] at the sygne of ye Meremayd at Polls gate next to Chepe syde, The yere of our Lord .M.v.C.xxv. The .xxiii. day of March [23 March 1525/1526]. [ESTC S95249; STC 22869.7; Gibson #530; Sullivan 4:103–104. Prescott (cf. Marc'hadour (Univers 363n2) argues for 1526, see Prescott, Crime and Carnival, p.247 and n.1 on pp.262–63.]
  2. Smith, Walter. XII. mery iests, of the wyddow Edyth, this lying widow, false and craftie, late i[n] Engla[n]d, hath deceiued many: both man and women of euery degree, as wel of the spiritual, as temporaltie lordes, knights, and gentlemen also: ... Now newly printed, this present yeare, for such as delite, mery iests for to here. [Imprinted at London: in Fleetlane: by Richarde Iohnes], 1573. [ESTC S111031; STC 22870.]
  3. Hazlitt, William, C. ed. Twelve Mery Jests of the Wydow Edyth. Shakespeare jest-books; reprints of the early and rare jest-books supposed to have been used by Shakespeare. Edited with an introd. and notes by W. Carew Hazlitt. London: Willis & H. Sotheran, 1864. Vol. 3:27–108. Online at https://archive.org/details/shakespearejestb03hazluoft [Based on 1573.]
  4. Reed, Arthur William. The Twelve Merry Jests of the Widow Edyth and the Household of More. Early Tudor Drama: Medwall, the Rastells, Heywood, and the More Circle. London: Methuen, 1926; rpt. New York: Octagon Books, 1969. 149–59.
  5. Routh, E. M. G. Sir Thomas More and His Friends, 1477–1535. London: Oxford UP, 1934. Rpt. New York: Russell & Russell, 1963. 144–45.
  6. Woodbridge, Linda. New Light on The Wife Lapped in Morel's Skin and The Proud Wife's Paternoster. English Literary Renaissance 13 (1983): 3–35. [Deals with connections between these two anonymous Jests and Walter Smith and the More Circle.]
  7. Prescott, Anne Lake. Crime and Carnival at Chelsea: Widow Edith and Thomas More's Household. Miscellanea Moreana: Essays for Germain Marc'hadour. Moreana 100: Volume XXVI Mélanges Marc'hadour. Ed. Clare M. Murphy, Henri Gibaud and Mario A. DiCesare. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 61. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1989. 247–64. Online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana100pages247-264.pdf [Sum.: Moreana 98/99 (1988): 159, 254; Geritz I088. On a work by Walter Smith about More's household.]
  8. Devereux, E. J. A Bibliography of John Rastell. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1999. #20, pp.119–20.
  9. Shrank, Cathy. Smith, Walter (fl. 1525). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [2004] ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/25918) [Stub.]
  10. Munro, Ian, and Anne Lake Prescott. Jest Books. The Oxford Handbook of English Prose 1500–1640. Edited by Andrew Hadfield. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2013. 343–359, esp. 348–52.

Sir John Spelman (c.1480–1546)

  1. Baker, J. H., ed. The Reports of Sir John Spelman. 2 vols. London: Seldon Society, 1977–78.
  2. Reynolds, E. E. One of Thomas More's Judges. [1977] See Thomas More's Imprisonment and Trial: Spelman's Report.
  3. Baker, J. H. Spelman, Sir John (c.1480–1546). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Jan 2008] ( http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/26105)

Thomas Spinelly (Spinelli, Spynell) (1472–26 August 1522)

Not in ONDB, or NDB, see Rogers #10, intro. on p.17. Tommaso di Guasparre Spinelli, a naturalized English subject, from Florence served under Henry VII and VIII as English Ambassadaor to the Court of Flanders. He was appointed resident ambassador of Spain in 1517, where he died in Valladolid in 1522. See LP and CSP Venice.

  1. Behrens, Betty. The Office of the English Resident Ambassador: Its Evolution as Illustrated by the Career of Sir Thomas Spinelly, 1509–22., Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 4th ser., xvi (1933): 161–95.
  2. Philip Jacks, and William Caferro. The Spinelli of Florence: Fortunes of a Renaissance Merchant Family. Philadelphia: Penn State UP, 2001.

See also Domnina, Ekaterina Gennadevna, A Diplomat's Legacy: Tommaso Spinelli’s Self-Representation in His Testament (1522). http://istina.msu.ru/conferences/presentations/19786177/ and http://www.premoderndiplomats.org/uploads/1/2/8/0/12803247/sev_programme.pdf.

John Stanbridge (1463–1510)

ESTC lists 177 editions of Stanbridge's grammatical works.

  1. Stanbridge, John. The Vulgaria of John Stanbridge and the Vulgaria of Robert Whittinton. Ed. Beatrice White. Early English Text Society 187. London: Oxford UP, 1932. ***–***.
  2. Nugent, E. M., ed. John Stanbridge. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 114–16. [Excerpts from Stanbridge's Vulgaria.]

Thomas Starkey (1490/1499–1538)

Editions

Check ESTC, ODNB.

  1. Starkey, Thomas. An exhortation to the people, instructynge theym to unitie and obedience. London: Th. Berthelet, 1536?. Rpt. (The English Experience 625) Amsterdam: Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, 1973. [Rpt. of STC 23236.]
  2. Cowper, J. M., ed. England in the Reign of Henry the Eighth. A Dialogue between Cardinal Pole and Thomas Lupset, Lecturer in Rhetoric at Oxford. London: Oxford UP (EETS, extra series 12), 1871. Rpt. in S. J. Herrtage, ed. Starkey's Life and Letters. below. [Sullivan 1:222.]
  3. Herrtage, S. J., ed. England in the Reign of Henry VIII: Life and Letters and A Dialogue between Cardinal Pole and Lupset by Thomas Starkey. EETS, e.s. 12, 32. London, Pub. for the Early English Text Society, by N. Trübner & Co., 1871–78. Rpt. London, Pub. for the Early English text Society, by H. Milford, Oxford Univ. Press, 1927; Rpt. Millwood, N.Y.: Kraus Reprint, 1975. Available online at https://archive.org/details/englandinreignk00cowpgoog
  4. Burton, K. M., ed. A Dialogue Between Reginald Pole and Thomas Lupset. London: Chatto & Windus, 1948. [Modern spelling edition, superceded by Mayer's (1989) edition.]
  5. Mayer, Thomas F., ed. A Dialogue between Pole and Lupset. Publications of the Camden Society, 4th ser., 37. London: Royal Historical Society, 1989. [A Diplomatic transcription of the Text.]
    Review:
    1. F. W. Conrad, Sixteenth Century Journal 21 (1990): 143–44.
    2. S. J. Gunn, Journal of British Studies 30 (1991): 216–21.
    3. S. Lockwood, Journal of Ecclesiastical History 41 (1990): 687–88.

Selections

  1. Ross, J. B., and M. M. McLaughlin, eds. Thomas Starkey: The Reform of the Commonwealth. The Portable Renaissance Reader. New York: Viking P, 1953. 354–65. [An excerpt from Cowper's edition with modernized spelling.]
  2. Nugent, E. M., ed. Thomas Starkey. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 193–201. [An brief excerpt from the Dialogue Between Pole and Lupset.]
  3. Elton, G. R., ed. Thomas Starkey: The Laws of England. Renaissance and Reformation, 1300–1648. New York: MacMillan, 1968. 118–20. [A brief excerpt from Burton's translation.]
  4. Creeth, E., ed. From A Dialogue between Thomas Lupset and Reginald Pole. Tudor Prose, 1513–1570. Garden City, NY: Anchor Books, 1969. 365–95, 489. [Part III of Starkey's Dialogue.]
  5. Slavin, Arthur, ed. Thomas Starkey: From His Life and Letters and Dialogue. Humanism, Reform, and Reformation in England. New York: Wiley, 1969. 120–35, 174–77. [Excerpts from the translations of Herrtage and Burton.]

Studies

  1. Baumer, F. Le Van, Thomas Starkey and Marsilius of Padua. Politica 2 (1936): 14–27.
  2. Zeeveld, W. G. Thomas Starkey and the Cromwellian Polity. Journal of Modern History 15 (1943): 177–91.
  3. White, H. C. The Utopia and Commonwealth Tradition. [1944] See Utopia: Social and Political Philosophy.
  4. Caspari, F. Thomas Starkey. Humanism and the Social Order in Tudor England. New York: Teachers College P, 1954. 210–50. [cf. Sullivan 1:173.]
  5. Lehmberg, Stanford E. English Humanists, the Reformation, and the Problem of Counsel. [1961] See Utopia: Utopia Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, and Reform.
  6. Ferguson, Arthur B. The Tudor Commonweal and the Sense of Change. Journal of British Studies 3:1 (1963): 11–35. Abbr. version in Humanism, Reform, and Reformation in England. Ed. by Arthur J. Slavin. New York: Wiley, 1969. 205–12. [Deals mainly with Starkey's Dialogue; deals with More on pp.27–28.]
  7. Elton, G. R. Reform by Statute: Thomas Starkey's Dialogue and Thomas Cromwell's Policy. Proceedings of the British Academy 54 (1968): 165–88. Rpt. in Studies in Tudor and Stuart Politics and Government. 4 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, Vols. 1–2: 1974; Vol. 3: 1983; Vol. 4: 1992. 2: 236–58.
  8. McLean, Andrew M. Political Commitment — Pole and Starkey. Humanism and the Rise of Science in England. London: Heinemann, 1972. 63–69.
  9. McLean, Andrew M. A Note on Thomas More and Thomas Starkey. [1974] See Utopian Communism, Justice, Law, Property and Prosperity.
  10. Mayer, Thomas F. Starkey and Melanchthon on Adiaphora: A Critique of W. Gordon Zeeveld. Sixteenth Century Journal 11:1 (1980): 39–50.
  11. Mayer, Thomas F. Faction and Ideology: Thomas Starkey's Dialogue. Historical Journal 28 (1985): 1–25.
  12. Mayer, T. F. Thomas Starkey's Aristocratic Reform Programme. History of Political Thought 7 (1986): 439–61.
  13. Mayer, Thomas F. Thomas Starkey, An Unknown Conciliarist at the Court of Henry VIII. Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (1988): 207–27.
  14. Mayer, Thomas F. Thomas Starkey and the Commonweal: Humanist Politics in the Reign of Henry VIII. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1989.
    Review:
    1. F. W. Conrad, Sixteenth Century Journal 21 (1990): 143 & 333–34.
    2. G. R. Elton, Historical Journal 33 (1990): 243–46.
    3. S. J. Gunn, Journal of British Studies 30 (1991): 216–21.
    4. D. Hoak, Renaissance Quarterly 43 (1990): 863–65.
    5. S. Lockwood, Journal of Ecclesiastical History 41 (1990): 687–88.

Syon Abbey

See also https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syon_Monastery.

  1. Aungier, George James. The history and antiquities of Syon Monastery, the parish of Isleworth, and the chapelry of Hounslow. London: Printed by and for J. B. Nichols and son, 1840. Available online at https://archive.org/details/historyandantiq00aunggoog [Sullivan I:34–35.]
  2. Wright, Thomas, ed. Three chapters of letters relating to the suppression of monasteries. Camden Society 26. London: Printed for the Camden society, by J. B . Nichols and son, 1843. Available online at https://archive.org/details/threechaptersle00wriggoog
  3. Bateson, Mary, ed. Catalogue of the library of Syon Monastery, Isleworth. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1898. Available online at https://archive.org/details/cu31924091025860 [Corpus Christi College (University of Cambridge). Library. Manuscript. 141.]
  4. Dunning, Robert W. The Muniments of Syon Abbey: Their Administration and Migration. Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 37 (1964): 1–11.
  5. Tait, M. B. The Brigittine monastery of Syon (Middlesex) with special reference to its monastic usages. DPhil diss., University of Oxford, 1975.
  6. Rhodes, J. T. Syon Abbey and its religious publications in the sixteenth century. Journal of Ecclesiastical History 44 (1993): 11–25.
  7. Jones, Edward Alexander, and Alexandra Walsham, eds. Syon Abbey and Its Books: Reading, Writing and Religion, C.1400–1700. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell & Brewer, 2010.
  8. Da Costa, Alexandra. The King's Great Matter: Writing under Censure at Syon Abbey 1532–1534. Review of English Studies 62:253 (Feb. 2011): 15–29.

Cuthbert Tunstall (Tunstal) (1474–18 November 1559)

Editions

Check Shaaber T150 to T164, USTC, EEBO/TCP and DTC, ODNB, CE and ESTC.

  1. De Arte Supputandi libri quattuor. London: Pynson, 14 October 1522. [STC 24319.]
  2. Check Shaaber T155 to T159 for more continental editions.
  3. Certain Godly and Devout Prayers made in Latin by the Reverend Father in God, Cuthbert Tunstall, Bishop of Durham, and translated into English by Thomas Paynell, clerk. London: ***, 1525?. [See STC ***; ESTC ***]
  4. Hinde, Gladys, ed. The Registers of Cuthbert Tunstall, Bishop of Durham, 1530–59, and James Pilkington, Bishop of Durham, 1561–76. Edited and calendared by Gladys Hinde. Publications of the Surtees Society, 161. Durham: Andrews & Co.; London: Bernard Quaritch, 1952.
  5. Nugent, E. M., ed. Cuthbert Tunstall. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 48–50, 178–80. [Preface to De arte supputandi addressed to Thomas More (Rogers 111), and a letter to Wolsey (21 January 1521) on Luther.]
  6. Tunstall, Cuthbert. Licence for Sir Thomas More to keep and read heretical books, 7 March 1528. See More's Correspondence: Individual Letters.
  7. Tunstall, Cuthbert. A sermon of Cuthbert Tunstall, Bishop of Durham, preached on Palm Sunday, 1539, before King Henry VIII. London, T. Rodd, 1823. Available online at https://archive.org/details/sermonofcuthbert00tunsuoft
  8. Tunstall, Cuthbert. Certain Godly and Devout Prayers. Made in Latin by ... Cuthbert Tunstall ... and translated into English by Thomas Paynell, etc. Lat. & Eng. Orchard Books. Extra series. no. 1. London: Burns, Oates & Co.: London, 1925. xvi. 51p.
  9. Daye, George. Academiae Cantabrigiensis oratoris publici ad Cuthb. Tunstallum pro codicum Graec. donatione epistola. Cambridge : Water Lane Press, MCMLIV (1954) 4p. [Worldcat OCLC 314368104. Draft of a letter by George Day, 1528.]

Studies

  1. Phillips, George E. The Extinction of the Ancient Hierarchy: An Account of the Death in Prison of the Eleven Bishops Honoured at Rome Amongst the Martyrs of the Elizabethan Persecution: Archbishop Heath of York, Bishops Tunstall, Bonner, and Companions. London: Sands and Company; St. Louis: B. Herder, 1905. 152–94. Available online at https://archive.org/details/extinctionancie00philgoog
  2. Ross-Lewin, G.H. Cuthbert Tunstall. Typical English Churchmen, Series 2. From Wyclif to Gardiner. Edited by John Neville Figgis. The Church Historical Society, 78. London: Society for the Promotion of Christian Knowledge, 1909. 135–66. Online at https://archive.org/details/typicalenglishch00londrich.
  3. Gee, John Archer. The Second Edition of the Utopia, Paris, 1517. [1933] See Utopia: Locations of Early Editions.
  4. Quinn, Edward. Bishop Tunstall's Treatise on the Holy Eucharist. Downside Review 51 (1933): 674–89.
  5. Sturge, Charles. Cuthbert Tunstall: Churchman, Scholar, Stateman, Administrator. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1938.
    Review:
    1. TLS 17 Dec. 1938: 796.
  6. Brooks, P. Notes on Rare Books. [1941] See Utopia: Locations of Early Editions.
  7. Koonz, Barbara Mary. A comparative study of Bishop Cuthbert Tunstal and Sir Thomas More. M.A. Diss. Catholic University of America, 1946. [Worldcat OCLC 59102281.]
  8. Butterworth, Charles C. Bishop Tunstall and the English Hortulus. The library chronicle 16:2 (1950): 37–45. [The author of the Hortulus was George Joye.]
  9. Marc'hadour, Germain. [Tunstall's Signature.] Moreana 6 (1965): 97. [Reproduces Tunstall's signature on a copy of Budé's Annotationes in XXIV Pandectarum Libros.]
  10. Rogers, E. F. Margaret of Austria's Gifts to Tunstal, More and Hacket After the Ladies' Peace. [1966] See More: Thomas More's Travels.
  11. Forster, A. Bishop Tunstall's Priests. Recusant History 9 (1967/68): 175–202.
  12. Mesnard, Pierre. Érasme à l'aune de Guillaume Budé. Moreana 19/20 (1968): 165–84. [On Cuthbert Tunstall's letter to Budé (Allen #583), includes French translation.]
  13. Thomas, William Morley House. Cuthbert Tunstal: a theological history. M.A. Diss. University of Western Ontario 1972. [Worldcat OCLC 15757012.]
  14. Loades, D. M. The Last Years of Cuthbert Tunstall, 1547–1559. Durham University Journal ns 35 (1973/74): 10–21. Also The Last Years of Cuthbert Tunstall (1547–1559). (Durham Cathedral Lecture). Durham: Dean and Chapter of Durham, 1973. 14p.
  15. Thomas, M. Tunstal: Trimmer or Martyr? Journal of Ecclesiastical History 24 (1973): 337–55.
  16. Garvin, David W. A critical analysis of the Mattingly thesis: the case of Cuthbert Tunstall. M.A. Diss, Kansas State University, 1977. [Worldcat OCLC 33902325.]
  17. Woods, Robert Lawrence Jr. Politics and Precedent: Wolsey's Parliament of 1523. [1977] See Thomas More's Political Career and Thought.
  18. Redworth, Glyn. A Study in the Formulation of Policy: The Genesis and Evolution of the Act of the Six Articles. Journal of Ecclesiastical History 37 (1986): 42–67.
  19. McConica, James. Cuthbert Tunstall (1474–18 November 1559). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 349–54.
  20. Moreau, J.-P. Politique et theologie chez les catholiques schismatiques anglais (1534–1553). [1988] See Stephen Gardiner.
  21. Herendeen, Wyman H., and Kenneth Bartlett. The Library of Cuthbert Tunstall, Bishop of Durham: (British Library Add. 40,676). Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America 85:3 (Sep. 1991): 235–296. [British Library Additional 40,676 records the holdings of the personal library of Cuthbert Tunstall (1474–1559), Bishop of Durham, a collection uncharacteristic in size and content for its time and one which reflects the historical environment of the period.]
  22. Johnson, C. Latin prayers of Cuthbert Tunstall, Renaissance man, friend of More and Erasmus, last Catholic bishop of Durham (1474–1530–1559). In unum congregati: Festgabe für Augustinus Cardinal Mayer, OSB, zur Vollendung des 80. Lebensjahres. Edited by Stephan Haering. Metten: Abtei-Verlag Metten, 1991. 177–200.
  23. Walker, Greg. Heretical sects in pre-reformation England. History Today 43:5 (May 1993: 42–48.
  24. D'Alton, Craig W. D. Cuthbert Tunstal and Heresy in Essex and London, 1528. Albion 35:2 (2003): 210–228. [Based chiefly on the Harleian Manuscript in the British Library and other primary sources in the Public Record Office.]
  25. O'Connell, M.R. Tunstall, Cuthbert. New Catholic Encyclopedia. Detroit: Gale, 2nd ed. 2003. Vol. 14:237.
  26. Loudon, Mark A. Cuthbert Tunstall, humanist bishop and counsellor to Henry VIII: education and ecclesiastical patronage in Tudor England. Ph. D. Diss. University of Toronto, 2004. [Worldcat OCLC (Abstract) 225710709.]
  27. Mason, John. Bartering problems in arithmetic books 1450–;1890. BSHM Bulletin: Journal of the British Society for the History of Mathematics 22:3 (2007): 160–181.
  28. Powell, Raymond. The English Church at the Frontier of Early Modern Catholicism. The Medieval History Journal 14:1 (2011): 101–127.
  29. Martin, Jan James. Cuthbert Tunstal, Thomas More, John Fisher, and the burning of William Tyndale's 1526 New Testament. Reformation 18:1 (2013): 84–105. (DOI)
  30. Newcombe, D. G. Cuthbert Tunstal (1474–1559). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online.[Sept. 2013] ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/27817)

Christopher Urswick (Urswyck) (c1448– 24 March 1522)

  1. Urswick, Thomas A. Records of the Family Urswyck, Urswick, or Urswick. St. Albans: Privately Printed: 1893. 81–140. [Cited by P. I. Kaufman, The Politique Churche, p. 25, n.25.]
  2. Ferguson, Wallace F. An Unpublished Letter of John Colet, Dean of St. Paul's. [1934] Calendar of Colet's Letters.
  3. McConica, J. K. English Humanists and Reformation Politics. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1965. 70–72, 298.
  4. Gale, F. K. Christopher Urswick, Dean of Windsor, 1448–1522. M.A. Diss. Warburg Institute, University of London, 1974.
  5. Kaufman, Peter Iver. Polydore Vergil and The Strange Disappearance of Christopher Urswick. Sixteenth Century Journal 17:1 (1986): 69–85.
  6. Kaufman, Peter Iver. The Eclipse of the Early Tudor Church: André, Fabyan, and Polydore Vergil. [] See Bernard André.
  7. Trapp, J. B. Christopher Urswick. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 357–60.
  8. Trapp, J. B. Christopher Urswick and His Books: The Reading of Henry VII's Almoner. Renaissance Studies 1 (1987): 48–70. Rpt. in Essays on the Renaissance and the Classical Tradition. London: Variorum Reprints, 1990. XV: 48–70 + Additions and Corrections: 3.
    Review:
    1. G. Marc'hadour, Moreana 98/99 (1988): 112–13.
  9. Trapp, J. B. Urswick, Christopher (1448?–1522). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [Sept. 2010] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/28024)

Polydore Vergil (Polidoro Virgilio) (c.1470–18 April 1555)

This entry needs major revisions.

Check CE, ODNB!, USTC, Shaaber F9–F123, Worldcat; and ESTC?

Anglica Historia

Manuscripts

Add MS of Anglica Historia, Book XXVII, see Denys Hay below

Editions and Translations

  1. Vergil, Polydore. Polydori Vergilii Vrbinatis Anglicae Historiae Libri XXVI. Ed. Simon Grynaeus. Basileae: Apud Io. Bebelium, 1534. [Shaaber F9; USTC 684704 and 684705; STC 24654; ESTC ***.]
  2. Vergil, Polydore. Polydori Vergilii Vrbinatis Angliae Historiae Libri Vigintisex. Basel: Apud Mich. Isingrinium, 1546. Rpt. Cambridge, MA: General Microfilm Co., [19–]. German books before 1601 Roll 1:3. [Shaaber F10; USTC 684706. 2nd revised edition.]
  3. Vergil, Polydore. Polydori Vergilii Urbinatis Anglicae Historiae Libri Vigintiseptem. Basel: Apud Mich. Isingrinium, 1555. Rpt. Menston: Scolar Press, 1972. [Shaaber F11; USTC 684679. 3rd edition. Rpt. of 1546 edition with an extra book (27) on Henry VIII's reign to 1537.]
  4. Vergil, Polydore. Polydori Vergilii Urbinatis Anglicae Historiae . . . Lugduni Batavorum [Leiden]: ***, 1651. [Worldcat, etc ***. ]
  5. Ellis, Henry, ed. Three Books of Polydore Vergil's English History Comprising the Reigns of Henry VI, Edward IV, and Richard III from an Early Translation. Camden Society, Old Series 29. London: J. G. Nichols and Son, 1844. Rpt. New York: AMS Press, 1968. Rpt. New York: Johnson Reprint Corp., 1968. [From a mid 16th century translation.]
  6. Ellis, Henry, ed. Polydore Vergil's English History From an Early Translation Preserved Among the MSS. of the Old Royal Library in the British Museum. Vol. I, Containing the First Eight Books, Comprising the Period Prior to the Norman conquest Camden Society, Old Series 36. London: J.G. Nichols and Son, 1846. Rpt. New York: AMS Press, 1968. Facsimile Rpt. Dyfed, Wales: Llanerch Publishers, 1996.
  7. Hay, Denys, ed. Vergil, Polydore. The Anglica Historia of Polydore Vergil, A.D. 1485–1537. 3rd Camden Series 74. London: Royal Historical Society, 1950. [Latin text and English translation. Critical edition of manuscript version and early printed editions.]
  8. Vergil, Polydore. Anglica Historia (1555). A hypertext critical edition by Dana F. Sutton. The Philogical Museum, 2005, rev. 2010. http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/polverg [Introduction, Text, and translation.]

Excerpts

  1. Vergil, Polydore. From English History. To Prove a Villain: The Case of King Richard III. Ed. by Taylor Littleton and Robert R. Rea. New York: MacMillan Co., 1964. 83–89. [An extract from Book XXV.]

Studies

  1. Gasquet, F. A. Some Materials for a New Edition of Polydore Vergil's History. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society ns 16 (1902): 1–17.
  2. Schütt, M. Polydore Vergil. Die englische Biographik de Tudor-Zeit. Hamburg: Friederichsen, de Gruyter & Co., 1930. 47–49.
  3. Hay, Denys. The Manuscript of Polydore Vergil's Anglica Historia. English Historical Review 54 (1939): 240–51.
  4. Koebner, R. The Imperial Crown of this Realm: Henry VIII, Constantine the Great and Polydore Vergil. Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 26 (1953): 29–52.
  5. Elliot, John R., Jr. Polydore Vergil and the Reputation of King John in the Sixteenth Century. English Language Notes 2 (1964/65): 90–92.
  6. Clough, Cecil H. Federigo Veterani, Polydore Vergil's Anglica Historia and Baldassare Castiglione's Epistola... ad Henricum Angliae regem. English Historical Review 82 (1967): 772–83.
  7. Kelly, H. A. Polydore Vergil. Divine Providence in the England of Shakespeare's Histories. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1970. 85–108, 325.
  8. Hanham, Alison. Polydore Vergil, the Second Italian. Richard III and His Early Historians. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1975. 128–51.
  9. Cespedes, F. V. The Final Book of Polydore Vergil's Anglica Historia: Persecution and the Art of Writing. Viator 10 (1979): 375–96.
  10. Hanham, Alison. Fact and Fantasy: Thomas More as Historian. [1979] See More. Richard III: Historiography and General Literary Studies.
  11. Gransden, A. The Humanist Historians: Thomas More and Polyore Vergil. See More. Richard III: Historiography and General Literary Studies.
  12. Carley, James P. Polydore Vergil and John Leland on King Arthur: The Battle of the Books. Interpretations [Memphis] 15:2 (1984): 86–100. Rpt. in King Arthur: A Casebook. Ed. Edward Donald Kennedy. New York: Garland, 1996. 185–204. [On the treatment of King Arthur in Polydore Vergil's Anglicae Historiae and John Leland's Commentarii de Scriptoribus Britannicis.]
  13. Kaufman, Peter Iver. Polydore Vergil's Fifteenth Century. The Historian 47 (1984/85) 512–23.
  14. Antonovics, A. V. Henry VII, King of England, by the Grace of Charles VIII of France. Kings and Nobles in the Later Middle Ages: A Tribute to Charles Ross. Ed. by Ralph A. Griffiths and James Sherborne. New York: St. Martin's, 1986. 169–184.
  15. Lee, Patricia Ann. Reflections of Power: Margaret of Anjou and the Dark Side of Queenship. Renaissance Quarterly 39:2 (1986): 183–217. [On Margaret of Anjou in Shakespeare's Hen VI.2, Hen VI.3 and Polydore Vergil.]
  16. Candido, J. Thomas More, The Tudor Chroniclers, and Shakepeare's Altered Richard. [1987] See More's Richard III: Dramatic Structure and Shakespeare.
  17. Dean, P. Tudor Humanism and the Roman Past: A Background to Shakespeare. [1988] See More. Richard III: Historiography and General Literary Studies.
  18. Attreed, Lorraine. England's Official Rose: Tudor Concepts of the Middle Ages. Hermeneutics and Medieval Culture. Ed. Patrick J. Gallacher and Helen Damico. Albany: State Univ. of New York P, 1989. 85–95 [On Polydore Vergil, William Camden and Samuel Daniel.]
  19. Freeman, T. S. From Cataline to Richard III: The Influence of Classical Historians on Polydore Vergil's Anglica historia. Reconsidering the Renaissance: Papers from the Twenty-First Annual Conference of the Centre for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies. Ed. M. A. DiCesare. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 93. Binghampton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1992. 191–214. [On Polydore Vergil's use of Sallust, Tacitus and Suetonius.]
  20. Mudan, Kavita. So mutable is that sexe: Queen Elizabeth Woodville in Polydore Vergil's Anglia historia and Sir Thomas More's History of King Richard III. [2009] See More's Richard III: Historiography and General Literary Studies. [Includes Bibliography.]

De Inventoribus Rerum and Other Works

Editions and Translations

  1. Vergil, Polydore. Polydori Vergilii Urbinatis adagiorum liber. Basel: Froben, 1521. [Shaaber F110; USTC 684684. According to Shaaber (P97), the first edition of the Prouerbiorum libellus was published in 1498.]
  2. Vergil, Polydore. Polydori Vergilii Urbinatis de rerum inventoribus. Louvain: 1644. [According to Shaaber (P18) the first edition was published in 1499.]
  3. Vergil, Polydore. Beginnings and Discoveries: Polydore Vergil's De Inventoribus Rerum. An Unabridged Translation and Edition with Introduction, Notes and Glossary. Ed. by Beno Weiss and Louis C. Pérez. Bibliotheca Humanistica & Reformatorica 56. Nieuwkoop: De Graaf Publishers, 1997.

Studies

  1. Perrat, Ch. Le Polydore Vergil de Rabelais. Bibliothèque d'Humanisme et Renaissance 10 (1949): 167–204. [On Rabelais's use of Vergil's De inventoribus rerum.]
  2. Starnes, D. T. Thomas Tyrwitt's Copy of Polydore Vergil's De Inventoribus Rerum. Texas Studies in Language and Literature 7 (1965/66): 255–63.
  3. Copenhaver, B. P. The Historiography of Discovery in the Renaissance: The Sources and Composition of Polydore Vergil's De inventoribus rerum, I–III. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 41 (1978): 192–214.
  4. Rothstein, Marian. Etymology, Genealogy, and the Immutability of Origins. Renaissance Quarterly 43 (1990): 332–347. [On Maurice Sceve, John Lemaire de Belges and Polydore Vergil.]

General Studies

  1. Leadam, I. S. Polydore Vergil in the English Law Courts. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society ns 19 (1905): 279–94.
  2. Whitney, E. A., and P. P. Cram. The Will of Polydore Vergil. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 4th ser. 11 (1928): 117–36.
  3. Hay, Denys. The Life of Polydore Vergil of Urbino. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 12 (1949): 132–51.
  4. Hay, Denys. Polydore Vergil, Renaissance Historian and Man of Letters. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1952.
  5. Alsop, J. D. Polydore Vergil's Final Rewards. Notes and Queries ns 27 (1980): 299–301.
  6. Kaufman, Peter Iver. Polydore Vergil and The Strange Disappearance of Christopher Urswick. [] See Christopher Urswick.
  7. Kaufman, Peter Iver. The Eclipse of the Early Tudor Church: André, Fabyan, and Polydore Vergil. [] See Bernard André.
  8. Copenhaver, Brian F. Polidoro Virgilio of Urbino, c1470–18 April 1555. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 397–99. [Check Bibliography.]
  9. Ruggeri, Romano. Un Amico di Erasmo, Polidoro Virgili. Biblioteca del Rinascimento. Urbino : QuattroVenti, c1992. [Includes correspondence between Polydore Vergil and Erasmus in the original Latin with Italian translation on facing pages.]
  10. Bacchielli, Ronaldo, ed. Polidoro Virgili e la cultura umanistica europea. Urbino: Accademia Raffaello, 2000.
    Review:
    1. Stelio Cro, Moreana 161 (2005): 121–28.
  11. Connell, William J. Vergil, Polydore [Polidoro Virgili] (c.1470–1555). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [2004] (http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/28224)
  12. Arnold, Jonathan. John Colet and Polydore Vergil: Catholic Humanism and Ecclesiology. [] See John Colet: General Studies. [See Arnold's Moreana article for Bibliography on Polydore Vergil.]
  13. Ruggeri, Romano. Polidoro Vergili, Erasmo e la Respublica litteraria. Erasmus and the Renaissance Republic of Letters. Proceedings of a Conference to Mark the Centenary of the Publication of the First Volume of Erasmi Epistolae by P.S. Allen, Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 5–7 September 2006. Edited by Stephen Ryle. Forword by Lisa Jardine. Disputatio, 24. Turnhaut, Belgium: Brepols, 2014. 189–201.

For bibliography, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polydore_Vergil.

Robert Wakefield

Check STC.

  1. Knighton, K. S. Robert Wakefield (d. 1537). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 423–24. [Include bibliography.]
  2. Jones, G. L., ed. and trans. Robert Wakefield: On the Three Languages [1524]. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 68. Binghampton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1989. [Edition and translation of Oratio de Laudibus et Utilitate Trium Linguarum. Introduction (p. 1–39).]
    Review:
    1. G. Hammond, Moreana 115/116 (1993): 121–26.
  3. Woolfson, Jonathan. Wakefield , Robert (d. 1537/8). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [Jan 2008]. (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/28410) [Include Bibliography.]

William Warham, Archbishop of Canterbury (c1452–1532)

Episcopal Registers

  1. Reg. William Warham. Lambeth Palace Library. 2 vols.***

General Studies

  1. Campbell, Lord John. Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal, From the Earliest Times till the Reign of George IV. First Series to the Revolution of 1688. In Three Volumes. 3+ vols. London: John Murray, 1845, 1846, etc. Vol. 1: 428–442. 1846 edition online at https://archive.org/details/livesoflordchan01camp. [cf. Sullivan 1: 155–56. Title varies in later editions, with additional volumes added to bring the account up to Queen Victoria's Reign.]
  2. Lupton, J. H., ed. Appendix C: Character of Archbishop Warham. The Lives of Jehan Vitrier . . . and John Colet. . . . Written in Latin, by Erasmus of Rotterdam in a letter to Justus Jonas, tr., with notes . London: George Bell and Sons, . 61–63. Online at https://archive.org/details/livesjehanvitri00erasgoog [English translation of Erasmus's praise of Warham in Book I of Ecclesiastes. Compare this with Miller's 2015 account below.]
  3. Moyes, James. An English Prelate on the Eve of the Reformation. Dublin Review 114 (April 1894): 390–419. [Appended on pp.401–414 is a transcription of Warham's speech, written in the summer of 1532 and intended for delivery at his coming trial. See Scarisbrick's comments (2008) on this speech.] Online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/docs/Warham1532.pdf
  4. Gairdner, James. Warham, William. Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 50:384.
  5. Allen, P. S. Dean Colet and Archbishop Warham. [1902] See Colet: General Studies.
  6. Scarisbrick, J.J. The Conservative Episcopy in England, 1529–1535. Ph.D. Diss. Cambridge, 1956.
  7. Kelly, Michael J. Canterbury Jurisdiction and Influence during the Episcopate of William Warham, 1503–1532. Ph.D. Diss. Cambridge, 1963.
  8. Kelly, Michael J. The Submission of the Clergy. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 5th ser., 15 (1965): 97–119.
  9. Kitching, Christopher. The Prerogative Court of Canterbury from Warham to Whitgift. Continuity and Change: Personnel and Administration of the Church in England 1500–1642. Edited by Rosemary O'Day and Felicity Heal. Leicester: Leicester UP, 1976. 191–214.
  10. Knighton, C.S. William Warham. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 427–31. [Check Bibliography.]
  11. D'Alton, Craig. William Warham and English heresy policy after the fall of Wolsey. Historical Research 77:197 (Aug. 2004): 337–357. (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1111/j.1468-2281.2004.00213.x)
  12. Scarisbrick, J.J. Warham, William (1450?–1532). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography [Jan 2008]. (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/28741) [Include Bibliography.]
  13. Miller, Clarence H. Tales of Some Deaths in the Late Letters of Erasmus. Liber Amicorum: A Collection of Essays by Elizabeth McCutcheon (Moreana Special Issue) Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): xxiii–xxxi. [Discusses deaths of Warham and Wolsey, pp. xxviii–xxxi. Miller translates Allen 10:#2758/38–83 on pp.146–47 and 10:#2776/43–51, p.173 on Warham's death compare with passage in Eccesiastes translated by Lupton above.]

Richard Whytford (Whitford) (1476?–1542)

See ESTC and USTC for early editions. See also http://lamop-intranet.univ-paris1.fr/auteurs_anglais/?i=visualisation&j=auteur&k=2357

Modern Editions

  1. Raynal, Wilfrid, ed. The Imitation of Christ. Translated by Richard Whitford. London: Chatto & Windus, 1872, 1908. Rpt. without Intro. and Appendices Mount Vernon, N.Y., Peter Pauper Press, n.d. 1908 edition available online at http://www.archive.org/details/ofimitationofchr00thomuoft
  2. Whytford, Richard, trans. The martiloge in Englysshe after the vse of the chirche of Salisbury and as it is redde in Syon with addicyons. Printed by Wynkyn de Worde in 1526. Ed. F. Procter and E. S. Dewick. Henry Bradshaw Society Volume 3. London: [Printed by Harrison and sons], 1893. Available online at https://archive.org/details/martilogeinengl00librgoog
  3. Klein, E. J., ed. The Imitation of Christ. From the First Edition of an English Translation Made c. 1530 by Richard Whitford. New York: Harper & Brothers, Publishers, 1941.
  4. Nugent, E. M., ed. Richard Whytford. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 376–83. [Extracts from The Following of Christ, A Work for Householders and The Jesus Psalter.]
  5. Hogg, J., ed. The Pype or Tonne of the Lyfe of Perfection. By Richard Whitford. Elizabethan and Renaissance Studies 89. Salzburg: Salzburg Studies in English Literature, 1979.

Studies

  1. Klein, J. The Life and Works of Richard Whitford. Yale Ph. D. Diss., 1937.
  2. Klein, E. J. Introduction. The Imitation of Christ. From the First Edition of an English Translation Made c. 1530 by Richard Whitford. Ed. E. J. Klein. New York: Harper & Brothers, Publishers, 1941. xi–lx.
  3. Caraman, P. G. An English monastic reformer of the sixteenth century. Clergy Review new ser., 28/1 (July 1947), 1–16.
  4. Peters, W. A. M. Richard Whitford and St. Ignatius' visit to England. Archivum Historiae Societatis Jesu 25 (1956): 328–50.
  5. Williams, G. Two Neglected London-Welsh Clerics: Richard Whitford and Richard Gwent. Transactions of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion (1961): 23–44 [pt 1]. Rpt. in Welsh Reformation Essays. Cardiff: University of Wales P, 1967. 67–89.
  6. Paul, J. E. The Humanists: Vives, More and Whytford. Catherine of Aragon and her Friends. London: Burns & Oates, 1966. 62–72, 100–102.
  7. White, Helen Richard Whytford and His Work. Studies in Honor of De Witt T. Starnes. Ed. T. P. Harrison et al. Austin, TX: The University of Texas, 1967. 181–214.
  8. Knighton, C. S. Richard Whitford, died c.1543. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 441–442.
  9. Lawrence, Veronica J. The life and writings of Richard Whitford. PhD diss., University of St Andrews, 1987. Available online through https://research-repository.st-andrews.ac.uk/handle/10023/2932
  10. Denley, M. Strictures on Interludes and Plays to Religious and Lay People in the Earlier Sixteenth Century. Notes and Queries ns 35 (1988): 444–45. [A brief note on Whytford's The Pype or Tonne.]
  11. Lawrence, Veronica. Richard Whitford and Translation. The Medieval Translator IV. Edited by Roger Ellis and Ruth Evans. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 123. Binghamton, NY: State University of New York, 1994. 136–152.
  12. Rhodes, J. T. Whitford, Richard (d. 1543?). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [2004] ( http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/29308) [Includes extensive bibliography.]
  13. Alakas, Brandon. A Monastic Reformation of Domestic Space: Richard Whitford's Werke for Housholders. Fifteenth-Century Studies 38 (2013): 1–19.

 R. Whitford, A werke of preparacion or of ordinaunce unto comunion or howselyng.
 The werke for housholders with the golden pistle and alphabete or a crosrowe
 called an A.B.C. (1531?) · ·
 
 R. Whitford, A dayly exercyse and experyence of dethe (1537)	
 

See also Syon Abbey, Margaret Beaufort, and The Imitation of Christ.

Robert Whittinton (Whittington) (1480?–1535?)

For Bibliography, see Carlson below. Check out ESTC.

Selected Editions and Excerpts

ESTC lists some 240 items when "Whittington, Robert" is entered.

  1. Whittinton, Robert. Opusculu[m] Roberti whittintoni in flore[n]tissima Oxoniensi achademia Laureati. Ad inuictissimu[m] principem Henricu[m] regem Angliae [et] franciae. Principem walliae et d[omi]n[u]m Hiberniae: de octenario numero epygramma. Ad honorificentissimu[m] d[omi]n[u]m Thomam wolc Cardinalem [et] legatum de latere libellus de difficultate iusticiae serua[n]dae in reipublicae gubernatione. Ad eundem panegyricon a laude quattuor virtutu[m] cardinalium. Libellus epygrammaton. Ad eximiu[m] principem Carolum Brandon Suffolciae ducem. Ad illustrem virum Thomam More . . . Ad lepidissimum poetam Sceltonem carmen. Eiusdem inuectiua ad quendam zoilum. Impressa Lo[n]dini: per me wynandu[m] de worde, anno post virgineu[m] partu[m] M. CCCCCxix. decimo vero kale[n]das Maij [10 kal. May 1519] [STC 25540.5; ESTC S111697; Gibson #593; Sullivan 4:286 and Sup:120; Boswell #688. Two epigrams in praise of More and Utopia, see Richard S. Sylvester, The Man For All Seasons Again, below.]
  2. Whittinton, Robert. Vulgaria Roberti VVhitintoni Lichfeldiensis, [et] de institutione grammaticulorum opusculum: libello suo de concinnitate grammatices accommodatu[m]: [et] in quattuor partes digestum.Eiusdem distichon. . . . [Londini : I[n] edibus Winandi de Worde, xxi. supra sesquimillesimum nostre salutis anno. [1521]] London: Wynkyn de Worde, 1521. [STC 25572; ESTC S105858; Gibson #594; Sullivan 4:287 and Sup:120; Boswell #689.]
  3. Whittinton, Robert. The Vulgaria of John Stanbridge and the Vulgaria of Robert Whittinton. Ed. Beatrice White. Early English Text Society 187. London: Oxford UP, 1932. [on p.64 in describing More Whittington translates Erasmus' famous phrase homo omnium horarum as a man for all seasons, see Biographers: Erasmus.]
  4. Nugent, E. M., ed. Robert Whittinton. The Thought and Culture of the English Renaissance: An Anthology of Tudor Prose, 1481–1555. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1956. 126–35. [Excerpts from Whittinton's Vulgaria.]

Studies

  1. Bennett, H. S. A Check-List of Robert Whittinton's Grammars. Library 5th ser., 7 (1952): 1–14.
  2. Nixon, H.M. The Gilt Binding of the Whittinton Epigrams, MS Bodley 523. Library 5th ser., 7 (1952): 120–121.
  3. Sylvester, Richard S. The Man For All Seasons Again: Robert Whittington's Verses to Sir Thomas More. [1962] See Thomas More: Poems and Epigrams from the 16th to the 19th Centuries.
  4. Gabel, John Butler. The Year of Robert Whittington's Death. Huntington Library Quarterly 28 (): 77–78.
  5. Carlson, David R. Printed and Manuscript Reduplication of the Same Piece of Writing: Robert Whittinton's Printed Opusculum of 1519 and a Manuscript for Cardinal Wolsey. English Humanist Books: Writers and Patrons, Manuscript and Print, 1475–1525. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1993. 102–122, 224–231, and Figs. 19–22, between pp.74–75.
  6. Orme, Nicholas. Whittington, Robert (c.1480–1553?). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [Sept. 2010] ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/29331)

Nicholas Wilson (d.1548)

For a short bio, see Rogers n. to #200/43, pp.503–504.

  1. (L). Prefatory Letter by Nicholas Wilson to the Christian Reader, Cambridge, Kalend. Ianuarii 1521. [1 January 1522]. See Calendar of Fisher's Letters and Paper.
  2. From John Leland's Epigrammata (1589). John Leland, Epigrammata (printed 1589), edited by Dana Sutton, online at http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/lelandpoems/ See CXXXIV on Nicholas Wilson.
  3. Two Letters from Thomas More to Dr. Nicholas Wilson, Tower of London, 1534. See Rogers #207, and Rogers #208
  4. Carleton, Kenneth. Wilson, Nicholas (d. 1548). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [2004] ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/29679)

Sir Richard Wingfield (c 1469–22 July 1525)

For short bios, see Allen #375***; Rogers intro. to #42, pp.92–93. For joint letters to and from More and Wingfield and Henry VIII or Wolsey, see Rogers #42, 49,50, 51, 53, 55; for other references to Wingfield, see Rogers #102/16, p.251; #116/4, p.279; and #132, p.305n13. For Sir Richard's brother Sir Robert, see below.

  1. Wingfield, John Maurice. Some Records of the Wingfield Family. London, J. Murray, 1925. [Worldcat OCLC 3554127.]
  2. Knighton, C.S. Sir Richard Wingfield. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 452.
  3. Robertson, Mary L. Wingfield, Sir Richard (b. in or before 1469, d. 1525). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [Oct. 2008] ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/29739)

Sir Robert Wingfield (c1464–18 March 1539)

For short bio, see Allen #326A *** and Rogers note to #137/1, p.315. For Sir Robert's brother Sir Richard see above.

  1. Wingfield, Robert, editor. Nobilissima disceptatio super dignitate & magnitudine regnorum Britannici & Gallici, habita ab utriusque oratoribus & legatis in concilio Constantiensi. Imprimebat Lovanii [Louvain] Theodoricus Martinus Alostensis [Thierry Martens] mense Martii [March] 1517. [USTC 403372; Shaaber W117. The Council of Constance was held in 1414–18.]
  2. Wingfield, John Maurice. Some Records of the Wingfield Family. London, J. Murray, 1925. [Worldcat OCLC 3554127.]
  3. Knighton, C.S. Sir Robert Wingfield (c1464–18 March 1539). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1985–87. 3: 453. [Check Bibliography.]
  4. Robertson, Mary L. Wingfield, Sir Robert (b. in or before 1464, d. 1539). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography Online. [Oct. 2008] ( http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ref:odnb/29741)

Cardinal Thomas Wolsey (1471–1530)

This is not meant to be a comprehensive bibliography of Wolsey

See also Salvador Miranda, Thomas Wolsey, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church; online at http://www2.fiu.edu/~mirandas/bios1515.htm#Wolsey.

  1. Fiddes, Richard. The Life of Cardinal Wolsey. London: John Barber, 1724. [ESTC ***; Sullivan 1:350.]
  2. Campbell, Lord John. Lives of the Lord Chancellors and Keepers of the Great Seal, From the Earliest Times till the Reign of George IV. First Series to the Revolution of 1688. In Three Volumes. 3+ vols. London: John Murray, 1845, 1846, etc. Vol. 1: 443–508. 1846 edition online at https://archive.org/details/livesoflordchan01camp. [cf. Sullivan 1: 155–56. Title varies in later editions, with additional volumes added to bring the account up to Queen Victoria's Reign.]
  3. Williams, Robert Folkestone. Lives of the English Cardinals: Including Historical Notices of the Papal Court, From Nicholas Breakspear (Pope Adrian IV) to Thomas Wolsey, Cardinal Legate. 2 Vols. London: Wm. H. Allen, 1868. Vol. II:246–532, 539–43. Online at https://archive.org/details/englishcardinals02willuoft. [Also includes Cardinals Bourchier (124–151), Morton (152–192) and Bainbridge (195–245, 535–539).]
  4. Mandell, Creighton. Cardinal Wolsey. Twelve English Statesmen. London; New York: Macmillan and Co., 1888, 1891, 1903, 1908, 1912, 1921. Rpt. as The Life of Cardinal Wolsey. With Explanatory Notes by Henry Ketcham. New York: A.L.Burt, 1903. 1888 online at https://archive.org/details/cu31924027961766. Librivox recording available at https://archive.org/details/cardinalwolsey_1607_librivox. [Sullivan 2:227.]
  5. Gairdner, James. Wolsey, Thomas. Dictionary of National Biography, 1885–1900. XXI: 796–814 (62:325–343). Online at https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Wolsey,_Thomas_(DNB00).
  6. Gairdner, James. The Fall of Cardinal Wolsey. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 8 (1899): 75–102. [Sullivan 2:3.]
  7. Taunton, E. L. Thomas Cardinal Wolsey, Archbishop of York. American Catholic Quarterly Review 25 (1900): 289–329.
  8. Dwyer, J. J. Note on Wolsey's Reform. Dublin Review 171 (1922): 232–44. [Sullivan 1:304.]
  9. Pollard, A.F. Wolsey. London: Longmans, Green, and Company, 1929. Rpt. with and Intro. by Geoffrey Elton. London: Collins, 1965.
    Review(s):
    1. Conyers Read, The American Historical Review 35:2 (Jan 1930): 337–339.
  10. Belloc, Hilaire. Wolsey. London and Philadelphia: Lippencott, 1930. Rpt. London: Cassell, 1933. Rpt. Kessinger, 2003. [Sullivan 1:70.]
  11. Charles W. Ferguson. Naked to Mine Enemies: The Life of Cardinal Wolsey. Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1958.
  12. Harris, William O. Wolsey and Skelton's Magnyfycence: A Re-evaluation. [1960] John Skelton.
  13. Chambers, D. S. Cardinal Wolsey and the Papal Tiara. Bulletin of the Institute of Historical Research 38 (1965): 20–30.
  14. Casey, Ralph Brinsley. The Social Policy of Cardinal Wolsey. Ph.D. Diss., Rutgers U, 1973.
  15. Lasher, Charles Frederick. The Historiography of Thomas Wolsey. Ph.D. Diss, Catholic U of America, 1973.
  16. Elton, Geoffrey R. Cardinal Wolsey. Studies in Tudor and Stuart Politics and Government. 4 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, Vols. 1–2: 1974; Vol. 3: 1983; Vol. 4: 1992. 1:109–128.
  17. Woods, Robert Lawrence, Jr. The Amicable Grant: Some Aspects of Wolsey's Rule in England, 1525–1526. Ph.D. diss., U of California-Los Angeles, 1974.
  18. Williams, Neville. The Cardinal and the Secretary: Thomas Wolsey and Thomas Cromwell. London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1975; New York: MacMillan, 1976.
  19. Guy, John. Wolsey, the Council and the Council Courts. English Historical Review 91 (1976): 481–505.
  20. Guy, John. The Cardinal's Court: The Impact of Thomas Wolsey in Star Chamber. Hassock, Sussex: The Harvester P, 1977.
  21. Woods, Robert Lawrence Jr. Politics and Precedent: Wolsey's Parliament of 1523. [1977] See Thomas More's Political Career and Thought.
  22. Scarisbrick, J. J. Cardinal Wolsey and the Common Weal. Wealth and Power in Tudor England. Ed. E. W. Ives, R. J. Knecht, and J. J. Scarisbrick. London: The Athlone P. 1978. 45–67.
  23. Mullally, E. Wolsey's Proposed Reform of the Oxford University Statutes: A Recently Discovered Text. Bodleian Library Record 10 (1978/82): 22–27.
  24. Gwyn, Peter. Wolsey's Foreign Policy: The Conferences at Calais and Bruges. Historical Journal 23 (1980): 755–72.
  25. McLane, Paul E. Prince Lucifer and the Fitful Lanternes of Lyght: Wolsey and the Bishops in Skelton's Colyn Cloute. [1980] See John Skelton.
  26. Harvey, Nancy Lenz. Thomas Cardinal Wolsey. London: Collier Macmillan, 1981.
  27. Ridley, Jasper G. Statesman and Saint: Cardinal Wolsey, Sir Thomas More, and the Politics of Henry VIII. [1983] See More: Modern Biographies (1964–Present).
  28. Bernard, G. W. Taxation and Rebellion in Tudor England: Henry VIII, Wolsey and the Amicable Grants of 1525. Hassocks, Sussex: Harvester, 1986.
  29. Lehmberg, Stanford E. Thomas Wolsey, d.29 November 1530. Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation. Ed. P. G. Bietenholz and T. B. Deutscher. 3 vols. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2: . 3: 460–62.
  30. Gwyn, P. The King's Cardinal: The Life and Death of Thomas Wolsey. London: Barrie and Jenkins, 1990. Rpt. London: Pimlico Books, 1992, 2002; ebook 2011.
    Review(s):
    1. Richard Rex, Catholic Historical Review 78 (1992): 607–12.
  31. Gunn, S. J., and P. G. Lindley, eds. Cardinal Wolsey: Church, State and Art. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1991.
    Review(s):
    1. R. Haynes, Sixteenth Century Journal 23 (1992): 825–27.
    2. Richard Rex, Catholic Historical Review 78 (1992): 612–14.
  32. Wilson, Derek A. In the Lion's Court: Power, Ambition, and Sudden Death in the Reign of Henry VIII. [2002] See More: Modern Biographies (1964–Present).
  33. Jack, Sybil M. Thomas Wolsey (1471–1530), royal minister, archbishop of York, and cardinal. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Jan 2012] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/29854) [Include bibliography. 20484 words.]

See also LP Passim, George Cavendish, Henry VIII (Excluding the English Reformation), and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Wolsey for popular fictional treatments of Wolsey.

Elizabeth Woodville [Wydeville, Wydville, Widvile] (c.1437–1492), Queen Consort

Include items from Wikipedia and ODNB? Cross-reference to Thomas More's Richard III.

  1. Scofield, C. L. Elizabeth Wydevile in the Sanctuary at Westminster, 1470. English Historical Review 24 (1909): 90–91.
  2. Fahy, C. The Marriage of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville: A New Italian Source. English Historical Review 76 (1961): 660–72. [A contemporary account (1468), parallels later accounts by Mancini, More and Hall.]
  3. Myers, Alexander Reginald. The Household of Queen Elizabeth Woodville, 1466–67. Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 50 (1967–68): 207–35, 443–81. Rpt. Crown, Household and Parliament in Fifteenth Century England. Ed. by Cecil H. Clough, intro. by R. B. Dobson. History Series 46. London: Hambledon P, 1985. 251–320.
  4. David Baldwin. Elizabeth Woodville: Mother of the Princes in the Tower. Gloucestershire: Sutton, 2004. (2002?)
  5. Mudan, Kavita. So mutable is that sexe: Queen Elizabeth Woodville in Polydore Vergil's Anglia historia and Sir Thomas More's History of King Richard III. [2009] See More's Richard III: Historiography and General Literary Studies. [Includes Bibliography.]
  6. Hicks, Michael. Elizabeth [née Elizabeth Woodville] (c.1437–1492), queen of England, consort of Edward IV. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. [Sept 2011] (http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/8634) [Includes bibliography.]

For popular treatments of Elizabeth Woodville in television, film, and fiction, see Wikipedia.

Thomas Wyatt's Translation of Plutarch's Quyete of Mynde (1527)

Editions

  1. Thomas Wyatt. Tho. wyatis translatyon of Plutarckes boke, of the quyete of mynde. [Imprinted at London : In Fletestrete by Richarde Pynson, printer to the kynges moost noble gracc [sic], [1528]] Online at http://tei.it.ox.ac.uk/tcp/Texts-HTML/free/A09/A09791.html [STC 20058.5; ESTC S110511. Dedicated to Queen Katherine.]
  2. Baskervill, C. R., intro. Plutarch's Quyete of Mynde. Translated by Thomas Wyat. Reproduced in facsimile from the copy in the Henry E. Huntington Library. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1931. [Reprints S.T.C. 20058.5. Wyatt translated from Guillaume Budé's Latin translation of Plutarch's De tranquillitate animi. Baskervill's introduction (pp. v–xv) discusses Wyatt's prose style and his dependence on Budé's Latin translation.]
  3. Muir, K., and P. Thomson, eds. Appendix B: The Quyete of Mynde. The Collected Poems of Sir Thomas Wyatt. Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1969. 440–63. [Transcription made from facsimile of the copy in the Huntington Library.]

Studies

  1. Brilliant, A. N. The Style of Wyatt's The Quyete of Mynde. Essays and Studies ns 24 (1971): 1–21.
  2. Thomson, P. A Note on Wyatt's Prose Style in Quyete of Mynde. Huntington Library Quarterly 25 (1961/62): 147–56.
  3. Thomson, P. Sir Thomas Wyatt: Classical Philosophy and English Humanism. Huntington Library Quarterly 25 (1961/62): 79–96.