International Thomas More Bibliography (V):
Utopia, Part B: Studies


Note: The International Thomas More Bibliography is a very extensively revised and augmented version of the Bibliographical Appendix to my Ph.D. Dissertation. An earlier somewhat revised version of the Utopia section was published online as a digital publication in 1995 in EMLS. Any comments, corrections, suggested additions or queries can be sent to the compiler and editor at lakowskir@gmail.com

Version 1.4a (); © Romuald I. Lakowski ,


Table of Contents

 

International Thomas More Bibliography

Abbreviations
Opera Omnia, Correspondence and Humanistic Works
Polemical and Devotional Works and Trial
Background Studies
Family and Friends, and Biographies
Thomas More and the Creative Arts
Utopia Part A: Editions and Translations
Utopia Part B: Studies
Calendars of the Letters and Papers of Thomas More, John Fisher, and John Colet (Under Development)

Contemporaries of Thomas More

Part I: Fisher, Colet and the Carthusians
Part II: Early English English Renaissance (A—H)
Part III: Early English English Renaissance (J—W)


B. Studies of Utopia

General Studies:

Some Bibliographies of Secondary Scholarship
General Studies of Utopia

Genre, Composition, Parerga, Book I and Conclusion:

Genre and Interpretation
More's Utopian Embassy of 1515 and the Composition of Utopia
Prefatory Letters and Parerga
Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, Humanism and Reform
Raphael Hythloday as Narrator and Persona More
The Conclusion of Utopia

Literary Studies

Dialogue, Dialectic and Drama
Rhetoric, Fiction and Poetics
Irony, Paradox, Humour and Satire
Latin Style
Names in Utopia and the Utopian Language
Utopian Animals: Sheep, Monkeys and Chickens
Utopia: Gold and Chamber Pots

Geography in Utopia

Arcadia, Enclosed Gardens, Cities, Order and Nature
Location and Maps
Geographical Sources

Humanism, Ethics, Philosophy and Religion

Epicurus, Pleasure and Moral Philosophy
War and Peace in Utopia
Utopia and the History of Political Thought
Utopia and Renaissance Humanism
Social and Political Philosophy
Utopian Communism, Law, Property and Prosperity
Religion and Theology
Suicide and Death
Marriage, Divorce and Feminism

Classical and Medieval Sources and Analogues

Classical Sources: General Studies
Plutarch
Aristotle, Augustine, and Cicero
Utopia and Lucian
Other Classical Sources (Excluding Plato)
Utopia and Plato
Utopia and the Middle Ages

Utopia Through the Ages

Early Modern Reception of Utopia
More, Bacon, Andreae, Campanella and Burton
More, Castiglione and Sidney
More and Erasmus
More, Machiavelli, Seyssel and Bodin
Milton and Shakespeare
More, Rabelais, Montaigne, and Voltaire
More, Joseph Hall and Swift
Utopia, Doni and Italy
More, Bartolomé de Las Casas and Vasco de Quiroga
Utopia, Spain, New Spain and America
Utopia in the 16th to 18th Centuries
Utopia and Some Modern Utopian Novels
General Studies of Utopia

Marxism and Literary Theory

Unclassified Articles and Dissertations

Unpublished Dissertations
Unclassified Articles in German


Utopia, Part B: Studies

  1.  

General Studies:

Some Bibliographies of Secondary Scholarship

  1. Gibson, R. W., and J. M. Patrick. Section IX: Utopias and Dystopias, 1500–1750, Nos. 602–859, and Section X: Utopian Addresses, Nos. 860–877. St. Thomas More: A Preliminary Bibliography of His Works and of Moreana to the Year 1750, Compiled by R. W. Gibson, With a Bibliography of Utopiana by R. W. Gibson and J. Max Patrick. New Haven: Yale UP, 1961. 291–419.
  2. Rousseau, Marie-Claude, and P. Delendick. Utopiana in Moreana. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 301–02 + 69 (1981): 163–65 + 83/84 (1984): 143–44 + 95/96 (1987): 177 + 101/102 (1990): 146 + 110 (1992): 64 + 115/116 (1993): 46. [Geritz A007 (partial). Lists only articles (not reviews) until issue 82 (1984).]
  3. Samaan, Angele B. Utopias and Utopian Novels: 1516–1949, A Preliminary Bibliography. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 281–93. [Geritz A031.]
  4. Desroche, Henri. Petite bibliothèque de l'Utopie. Esprit 42 (1974): 663–70. [Geritz A008.]
  5. Negley, Glenn. Utopian Literature: A Bibliography with a Supplementary Listing of Works Influential in Utopian Thought. Lawrence: Regents P of Kansas, 1977. [Geritz A029.]
  6. Sargent, Lyman Tower. Secondary Works on Utopian Literature. British and American Utopian Literature, 1516–1975: An Annotated Bibliography. Boston, MA: G. K. Hall & Co., 1979. 167–290. Rev. ed.? as British and American Utopian Literature, 1516–1985: An Annotated, Chronological Bibliography. New York: Garland, 1988. [Geritz A032; Wentworth 628. Many citations for More's Utopia.]
    Review(s):
    1. Angele B. Samaan, Moreana 110 (1992): 51–54.
  7. Haschak, Paul G. Utopia. Utopian/Dystopian Literature: A Bibliography of Literary Criticism. Metuchen, N.J.: The Scarecrow P, 1994. 174–84. [Geritz A015. Lists over 140 items on More.]
  8. Lakowski, Romuald I. A Bibliography of Thomas More's Utopia. Early Modern Literary Studies 1.2 (1995): 6.1–10. This is a revised version of pp.305–337 (Items [278]–[736]) of my thesis bibliography online at https://circle.ubc.ca/handle/2429/2084 [An earlier version of this ITMB Utopia bibliography. Approx. 700 Items.]
  9. Marc'hadour, Germain. Thomas More: Utopia. Paris: Didier Érudition—CNED, 1998. [A Survey of Scholarship on More's Utopia in different languages.]
    Review(s):
    1. Claude Billot, Moreana 139/40 (1999): 137–48.
    2. Elizabeth McCutcheon, Utopian Studies 11:2 (2000): 198–202.
  10. Heyer, Andreas. Teil II: Die Utopia von Thomas Morus. Sozialutopien der Neuzeit: bibliographisches Handbuch. Vol. 2: Bibliographie der Quellen des utopischen Diskurses von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart. Politica et ars 18,2. Berlin: LIT Verlag, 2008. 151–266? [ISBN 978-3-8258-1997-2. Bibliography proper begins page 193. Limited Preview on Google Books.]

General Studies of Utopia

  1. Dudok, Gerhard. Sir Thomas More and His Utopia. Amsterdam: H. J. Paris, A. J. Kruyt, H. J. Pores, 1923. Published version of Ph.D. Diss. U of Amsterdam, 1923. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/sirthomasmorehis00dudouoft [Wentworth 590; Sullivan 1:296–97.]
  2. Brockhaus, Heinrich. Die Utopia-Schrift des Thomas Morus. Beiträge zur Kulturgeschichte des Mittelalters und der Renaissance 37. Leipzig: B. G. Teubner, 1929. [Sullivan 1:131.]
    Review(s):
    1. Historische Zeitschrift 142 (1930): 276–78.
  3. Campbell, W. E. More's Utopia and His Social Teaching. [1930] See Social and Political Philosophy.
  4. Donner, H. W. Introduction to Utopia. London: Sidgwick and Jackson, 1945. Rpt. Select Bibliographies Reprint Series. Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries P, 1969. Rpt. in part as A Moral Fable. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliff, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 33–39. [Geritz R102; Wentworth 589; Sullivan 1:286–87.]
  5. Battaglia, M. Felice. Saggi sull'Utopia di Tommaso Moro. Bologna: Cesare Zuffi Editore, 1949. [Sum.: Pierre Mesnard, Vers un Nouveau Portrait de Saint Thomas More, Recherches et Débats 7 (1954): 223.]
  6. Hexter, J. H. More's Utopia: The Biography of an Idea. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1952. Rpt. with an epilogue. New York: Harper, 1965. Rpt. Westport, CT: Greenwood P, 1976. The Roots of Utopia and all Evil. (Part II, Section 8) (Harper pp.71–81) rpt. in Utopia: Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1975. 170–77. Rpt. 2nd ed. 1992. 147–54. 3rd ed. 2011: 190–197. Rpt. as A Sermon on Pride. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 58–65. [Geritz R192; Wentworth 602; Sullivan 2:105.]
    Review(s):
    1. Richard J. Schoeck, Catholic Historical Review 38 (1953): 448–49.
    2. Richard J. Schoeck, Modern Language Notes 68 (1953): 498–500.
  7. Surtz, Edward. The Praise of Pleasure: Philosophy, Education and Communism in More's Utopia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1957. Pp. 36–43 rpt. as Utopian Felicity. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 70–75. Pp. 161–74 rpt. as Humanism and Communism. in Utopia: A Revised Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2nd ed. 1992. 169–81; 3rd ed. 2011. 202–13. Pp. 175–191 rpt. as Thomas More and Communism: The Solution. More's Utopia And its Critics. Ed. Ligeia Gallagher. Chicago: Scott, Foresman and Company, 1964. 148–59. [Geritz R403; Wentworth 565.]
    Review(s):
    1. Robert P. Adams, Renaissance News 11 (1958): 129–33.
    2. R. W. Zandvoort, English Studies 41 (1957): 331–33.
  8. Surtz, Edward. The Praise of Wisdom: A Commentary on the Religious and Moral Problems and Backgrounds of St. Thomas More's Utopia. Chicago: Loyola UP, 1957. [Geritz R404; Wentworth 566.]
    Review(s):
    1. R. W. Zandvoort, English Studies 41 (1957): 331–33.
    2. E. F. Rice, Jr., Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte 57 (1960): 112–13.
    3. Craig R. Thompson, Renaissance News 12 (1959): 203–08.
  9. Schoeck, Richard J. The Intellectual Milieu of More's Utopia: Some Notes. Moreana 1 (1963): 40–46. [Geritz R357. On the 5th Lateran Council, Oxford and Cambridge, St. Anselm's Cur Deus Homo and the English law courts as backgrounds to Utopia.]
  10. Elliott, Robert C. The Shape of Utopia: Studies in a Literary Genre. English Literary History 30 (1964): 317–34. Rpt. in The Shape of Utopia. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1970. 25–49. Rpt. in Sir Thomas More: Utopia. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1975. 177–92. Rpt. 2nd ed. 1992. 181–95. [Geritz R125; Wentworth 509.]
  11. Gallagher, Ligeia, ed. Twentieth-Century Opinion. More's Utopia and its Critics. Chicago: Scott, Foresman and Company, 1964. 91–170. [Contains essays by or excerpts from the works of Robert Bolt, Karl Kautsky, R. W. Chambers, Edward Surtz, David Bevington, Russell Ames, and others. Some items listed separately.]
  12. Hexter, J. H. Introduction: Utopia and Its Historical Milieu. [1965] See Book One, Europe, Dialogue of Counsel, and Reform.
  13. Surtz, Edward. Introduction. Utopia. Vol. 4 of The Yale Edition of the Complete Works of St. Thomas More. Ed. J. H. Hexter and Edward Surtz. New Haven: Yale UP, 1965. cxxv–cxciv. [Surtz's introduction deals mainly with the literary art and the sources of Utopia. Complements Hexter's historical introduction (xv–cxxiv).]
  14. Süssmuth, Hans. Studien zur Utopia des Thomas Morus. Ein Beitrag zur Geistesgeschichte des 16. Jahrhunderts. Reformationsgeschichtliche Studien und Texte 95. Münster: Aschendorff, 1967. [Geritz R409. Detailed analysis of classical sources and contemporary interpretations of Utopia.]
    Review(s):
    1. H. W. Donner, Moreana 36 (1972): 87–91.
  15. Nelson, William, ed. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. [Rev.: Henri Meulon, Moreana 22 (1968): 18. Contains essays by or excerpts from the works of R. W. Chambers, H. W. Donner, Karl Kautsky, Gerhard Ritter, Russell Ames, J. H. Hexter, C. S. Lewis, Edward Surtz, David Bevington, T. S. Dorsch, and others. Some items listed separately.]
  16. Johnson, Robbin S. More's Utopia: Ideal and Illusion. New Haven: Yale UP, 1969. [Geritz R207; Wentworth 606.]
    Review(s):
    1. Ward Allen, Moreana 25 (1970): 95–97.
    2. B. W. Beckingsale, Notes and Queries ns 18 (1971): 232–33.
    3. H. W. Donner, Studia Neophilologica 42 (1970): 226–28.
  17. Elliott, Robert C. The Shape of Utopia. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1970. [Geritz R126.]
  18. Adams, Robert M., ed. Criticism. Utopia: A New Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism By Sir Thomas More. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1975. 137–238. Rpt. 2nd rev. ed. 1992. 137–260; 3rd rev. ed. 2011. 157–310. [Contains essays by or excerpts from the works of R. W. Chambers, Karl Kautsky, Russell Ames, J. H. Hexter, C. S. Lewis, Elizabeth McCutcheon, and others. The later editions reprint some essays from the 1st edition, omit others, and add new essays. Some items listed separately.]
  19. Jones, Judith P. The Humanist: Utopia. Thomas More. Boston, MA: G. K. Hall (Twayne), 1979. 59–77, 151–53.
    Review(s):
    1. Robert Griffin, Charting More's Utopia, Science Fiction Studies 9 (1982); 215–16. [Geritz R167.]
  20. Trevor-Roper, Hugh. Sir Thomas More and Utopia. Renaissance Essays. London: Secker & Warburg, 1985; Rpt. Fontana Books, 1986. 24–58. [Geritz R416. Combines two earlier articles: The Intellectual World of Sir Thomas More, and another in Atti dei Convegni Lincei (1980).]
  21. Olin, John C., ed. Interpreting Thomas More's Utopia. New York: Fordham UP, 1989. [Articles also listed separately.]
    Review(s):
    1. Dorothy F. Donnelly, Moreana 100 (1992): 55–62.
    2. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 205–08.
    3. Clare M. Murphy, Sixteenth Century Journal 22 (1991): 883–84.
    4. Anne M. O'Donnell, Erasmus of Rotterdam Society Yearbook 12 91992): 127–29.
    5. Albert Rabil, Jr., Church History 61 (1992): 406–07.
  22. Baker-Smith, Dominic. More's Utopia. Unwin Critical Library. London: Harper Collins Academic, 1991. Rpt. Renaissance Society of America Reprint Texts 11. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2000. Pp. 201–227 rpt. as From Words and Deeds. in Utopia: A Revised Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Trans. Robert M. Adams. Edited with a Revised Translation by George Logan. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 3rd ed. 2011. 241–259. [Geritz R023.]
    Review(s):
    1. Ralph Keen, Sixteenth Century Journal 24 (1993): 736–38.
    2. George M. Logan, Review of English Studies ns 45 (1994): 247–48.
    3. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 222–27.
    4. Miguel Martínez López, St. Thomas More Gazette 4 (1994): 7–10.
    5. Germain Marc'hadour, Utopian Studies 4:2 (1993): 191%ndash;94.
  23. Quarta, Cosimo. Tommaso Moro: Una reinterpretazione dell' Utopia. Bari: Edizioni Dedalo, 1991.
    Review(s):
    1. Eliza Fabrizio, Moreana 121 (1995): 77–82.
  24. Fox, Alistair. Utopia: An Elusive Vision. Twayne Masterworks Studies 103. New York: Twayne, 1993. [Geritz R139.]
    Review(s):
    1. István Bejczy, St. Thomas More Gazette 4 (1994): 11–13.
    2. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 227–33.
  25. Logan, George M. Interpreting Utopia: Ten Recent Studies and the Modern Critical Editions. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 203–58. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana118-119pages203-258.pdf [A review article; reviews also listed separately.]
  26. Cousins, A. D., and Damian Grace, eds. More's Utopia and the Utopian Inheritance. Lanham, MY: University Press of America, 1995. [Some essays listed separately.]
    Review(s):
    1. István Bejczy, Sixteenth Century Journal 27:3 (1996): 947–48.
  27. Wenzel, Paul. Utopian Pluralism: A Systematic Approach to the Analysis of Pluralism in the Debate about Thomas More's Utopia. (Oct 1996?) http://webdoc.gwdg.de/edoc/ia/eese/artic96/wenzel/10_96.html
  28. Machado de Araújo. Joachim Tomás More e Utopia. Porto: Edições Afrontamento, 2006.
  29. Proceedings from the 2005 Thomas More Studies Conference, held at the University of Dallas, November 4–6, 2005. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006). http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tms1.html and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/tms1.pdf. Audio recordings of selected panels available at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/conference2005.html. [Items also listed separately. Some papers listed elsewhere.]
  30. Symposium on Utopia: Book 1 of Utopia: 1) Lehman Jeffrey S. Philosophic Designs: Dialogical Details in Utopia, Book 1. 2) Smith, Stephen W. Literary Designs: Thomas More's Utopia as Literature. 3) Questions and Discussion: More vs. Raphael, Justice and the Learned Professions. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006): 30–36 + 37–43 + 44–50. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/LehmanPhilosophicDesign.pdf and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/SWS_long_paper.pdf and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Symposium1.pdf
  31. Symposium on Utopia: Book 2 of Utopia: 1) Dougherty, Richard. Political Designs: The Politics of Utopia: Classical Influences on More's Utopia. 2) Boyle, John. Theological Designs: Religion in Utopia. 3) Questions and Discussion: Utopia and the Common Good. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006): 51–67 + 68–71 + 72–79. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Dougherty_Book_2.pdf and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Boyle_Religion_in_Utopia.pdf and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Symposium2.pdf
  32. Interpretation of Utopia as a Whole, Part 1. By Jeffrey S. Lehman, Richard Dougherty, Stephen W. Smith and John Boyle. Questions and Discussion: Designs in Utopia. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006): 80–81 + 84–88 + 82–83 + 89–90 + 91–101. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Lehman_Remarks_for_Symposium_3.pdf and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Dougherty.pdf and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/SWS_remarks.pdf and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Boyle.pdf and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Symposium3.pdf [Stephen W. Smith's remarks are subtitled: On The Second Letter to Giles: A Portrait of the Reader as a Sharp-Sighted Man.]
  33. Interpretation of Utopia as a Whole, Part 2 By Nathan Schlueter, Michael Foley, Samuel Bostaph, Jason Boffetti, Gabriel Bartlett, and Russell Osgood. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006): 102–112. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Interpretation_of_Utopia_as_a_Whole.pdf
  34. Utopia, a Round Table Discussion. [Utopia: A Year Later.] With Clarence H. Miller, George M. Logan, Elizabeth McCutcheon, et al. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006): 113–124. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/UTOPIA_a_year_later.pdf [This discussion actually took place a year later at the 2006 Thomas More Studies Conference on Richard III.]
  35. Foley, Michael. Variations on a Utopian Diversion: Student Game Projects in the University Classroom. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006): 188–95. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Foley.pdf [Reclassify?]
  36. Grace, Damian. Utopia. A Companion to Thomas More. Ed. A. D. Cousins, and Damian Grace. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 2009. 178–207. [Sum.: p.16. A survey of Utopia and its interpretors.]
  37. Davis, J. C. Thomas More's Utopia: Sources, Legacy, and Interpretation. The Cambridge Companion to Utopian Literature. Ed. Gregory Claeys. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010. 28–50. (DOI)
  38. Prescott, Anne Lake. More's Utopia: Medievalism and Radicalism. A Companion to Tudor Literature. Ed. Kent Cartwright. Blackwell companions to literature and culture. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. 279–94.
  39. Baker-Smith, Dominic. Reading Utopia. The Cambridge Companion to Thomas More. Ed. George Logan. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2011. 141–67. DOI)

Genre, Composition, Parerga, Book I and Conclusion

Genre and Interpretation

  1. Chambers, Raymond Wilson. The Meaning of Utopia, and Utopia and the Problems of 1516. Thomas More. London: Jonathan Cape, 1935. 125–44. Rpt. Ann Arbor, MI: U of Michigan P, 1958. Rpt. London: Penguin Books in Association with Jonathan Cape (A Peregrine Book), 1963. 118–37. Pp. 125–32, 135–37, 143–44 rpt. in Utopia: A New Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1975. 148–59. Rpt. 2nd ed. 1992. 137–47; 3rd ed. 2011. 167–79. [Chambers argues that the virtues of the pagan Utopians show up the vices of Christian Europe, and that The underlying thought of Utopia always is, With nothing save Reason to guide them, the Utopians do this; and yet we Christian Englishmen, we Christian Europeans . . . ! Pp.138–43 (1963, pp.130–35) deal with the "Location" of Utopia.]
  2. Donner, H. W. The Interpretation of Utopia. Studia Neophilologica 15 (1942–1943): 43–48. [Geritz R101; Wentworth 588. Donner follows Chambers: The First Book offers practical suggestions for reform, the Second Book is ironical.]
  3. Sanderlin, George. The Meaning of Thomas More's Utopia. College English 12 (1950/51): 74–77. [Geritz R351. Emphasises the literary quality of Utopia.]
  4. Sowards, J. K. Some Factors in the Re-Evaluation of Thomas More's Utopia. Northwest Missouri State College Studies 16 (1952): 31–58. [Geritz R382; Wentworth 638.]
  5. Surtz, Edward L. Interpretations of Utopia. Catholic Historical Review 38 (1952): 156–74. [Geritz R398; Wentworth 639. On three interpretations of Utopia: a) as a jeu d'esprit, b) as a serious program for action, or c) the Catholic interpretation, that Utopia is essentially a document of humanistic reform. Surtz opts for the third.]
  6. Lewis, C. S. [Utopia.] English Literature in the Sixteenth Century, Excluding Drama. Oxford History of English Literature, Vol. 3. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1954. 167–71. Rpt. in Essential Articles for the Study of Thomas More. Ed. Richard S. Sylvester and Germain Marc'hadour. Hamden, CT: Archon, 1977. 389–92. Rpt. as [A Jolly Invention.] in Utopia: A New Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1975. 217–20. 2nd ed. 1992. ***–***; 3rd ed. 2011. 198–202. [For Lewis Utopia has more to do with fiction and satire than the history of political thought, it is: a holiday work, a spontaneous overflow of intellectual high spirits, a revel of debate, paradox, comedy and (above all) of invention.]
  7. Coles, Paul. The Interpretation of More's Utopia. Hibbert Journal 56 (1958): 365–70. [Geritz R072; Wentworth 585; Sullivan 1:208–209. Literature vs. politics: Coles opts for politics.]
  8. Schulte Herbrüggen, Hubertus. More's Utopia as a Paradigm. Trans. by author from Utopie und Anti-Utopie. Von der Struckturanalyse zur Strukturtypologie. Beiträge zur Englishen Philologie 43. Bochum-Langendreer: Pöppinghaus, 1960. 16–37. Rpt. in Essential Articles for the Study of Thomas More. Ed. Richard S. Sylvester and Germain Marc'hadour. Hamden, CT: Archon, 1977. 251–62, 620–23. [Geritz R365; Wentworth 503.]
    Review(s):
    1. Gerhard Müller-Schwefe, Notes and Queries ns 12 (1965): 239–40.
  9. Prévost, André. L'Utopie: le genre litteraire. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 161–68. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages161-168.pdf [Geritz R327.]
  10. Sawada, Paul Akio. Toward the Definition of Utopia. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 135–46. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages135-146.pdf [Geritz R354; Wentworth 516.]
  11. Brann, Eva. An Exquisite Platform: Utopia. Interpretation: A Journal of Political Philosophy 3 (1972): 1–26. [Geritz R056; Wentworth 580.]
  12. Hay, Denys. Sir Thomas More's Utopia: Literature or Politics. Problemi Attuali di Scienza e di Cultura. Rendiconti dell' Academia Nazionale dei Lincei 175 (1972): 3–17. Rpt. in Renaissance Essays. London: Hambledon P, 1988. 249–63. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 285–299.
  13. Abrash, Merritt. Missing the Point in More's Utopia. Extrapolation 19 (1977): 27–38. [Sum.: Abrash R001; Wentworth 536.]
  14. Fox, Alistair. In Search of the Real Thomas More: An Approach to Utopia. Thomas More: The Rhetoric of Character. Ed. Alistair Fox and Peter Leech. Dunedin: U of Otago (A University Extension Publication), 1979. 17–34, 103–06. [Sum.: pp. 6–8; Geritz R137; Wentworth 596.]
  15. Suzuki, Yoshinori. Utopia Reinterpreted. Moreana 67/68 (1980): 31–34.
  16. Wooden, Warren W. Utopia and Dystopia: The Paradigm of Thomas More's Utopia. Southern Humanities Review 14:2 (1980): 97–110. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 69 (1981): 114 + 78 (1983): 29–30; Geritz R447; Wentworth 504.]
  17. Blaim, Artur. More's Utopia: Persuasion or Polyphony? [1982] See Dialogue, Dialectic and Drama.
  18. Hexter, J. H. Das dritte Moment der Utopia und seine Bedeutung. Utopieforschung: Interdisziplinäre Studien zur neuzeitlichen Utopie. [Utopia: Interdisciplinary Studies on modern Utopias] Ed. Wilhelm Voßkamp. 3 vols. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzler, 1982. 2: 151–67.
  19. Blaim, Artur. The Genre Structure of More's Utopia and the Tradition of Carnivalized Literature. Revista canaria de estudios ingleses 6 (1983): 1–14. [Geritz R044; Wentworth 506. Blaim first emphasizes the polyphony of different genre conventions, but then locates Utopia within the tradition of mennipean satire and carnivalesque literature.]
  20. Fox, Alistair. The Morean Synthesis: Utopia. Thomas More: History and Providence. New Haven: Yale UP, 1983. 50–75. Pp. 53–75 rpt. without most of Fox's notes as [An Intricate, Intimate Compromise.] in Utopia: A Revised Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2nd ed. 1992. 154–69; Rpt. 3rd ed. 2011. 228–40.
    Review(s):
    1. William G. Palmer, Southern Humanities Review 19 (1985): 354–55.
  21. Ludwig, Hans-Werner. Thomas More's Utopia: Historical Setting and Literary Effectiveness. Intellectuals and Writers in Fourteenth-Century Europe. The J. A. W. Bennett Lectures, Perugia, 1984. Ed. Piero Boitani and Anna Torti. Tübingen: Gunter Narr; Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1986. 244–64. [Geritz R241; Wentworth 513.]
  22. Marius, Richard. The Building of Utopia, and Utopia's Religion and Thomas More's Faith. Thomas More: A Biography. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984. Rpt. Vintage Books, 1985. 152–88, 531.
    Review(s):
    1. William G. Palmer, Southern Humanities Review 19 (1985): 356–57.
  23. Palmer, William G. Still More on Utopia: A Revival of The Catholic Interpretation? A Review Essay. Southern Humanities Review 19 (1985): 347–58. [Geritz R312. Reviews interpretations of Hexter, Fenlon, Bradshaw, Fox and Marius.]
  24. Levine, Joseph M. Thomas More and the English Renaissance: History and Fiction in Utopia. The Historical Imagination in Early Modern Britain: History, Rhetoric, and Fiction, 1500–1800. Ed. by Donald R. Kelley and David Harris Sacks. Cambridge: Woodrow Wilson Center Press and Cambridge UP, 1997. 69–92. [Sum.: pp.6–7.]
  25. Martínez López, Miguel. The Influence of Thomas More in the Creation and Development of Utopia as a Literary Genre. Europa: Wiege des Humanismus und der Reformation. 5 Internationales Symposion der Amici Thomas Mori 20. bis 27. Mai 1995 in Mainz. Dokumentation. Ed. Hermann Boventer and Uwe Baumann. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1997. 321–33.
  26. Bejczy, István. L'Utopie et les limites de l'interprétation. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Abulensis: Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies, Ávila, 4–9 August 1997. Ed. Rhoda Schnur, et al. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 207. Tempe, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2000. 113–118. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/actaconventusneo00inteuoft
  27. Havlíček, Aleš. Is More's Utopia a Utopian Book? Res Publica Litterarum. Documentos de trabajo del Grupo de Investigación Nomos. Suplemento Monográfico Utopía, 2006–07. Instituto Lucio Anneo Séneca. Ed. Francisco Lisi Bereterbide. Archivo Institucional de la Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. http://e-archivo.uc3m.es/bitstream/10016/554/1/iescpB060707.pdf and http://en.scientificcommons.org/20188479
  28. Saage, Richard. Utopia and Thomas More's Three Identities. Ideal Constitutions in the Renaissance: Papers for the Munich February 2006 Conference. Ed. Heinrich C. Kuhn, and Diana Stanciu. Renaissance Intellectual History, Band 1. Edited Heinrich C. Kuhn, Sachiko Kusukawa, Marianne Pade and Gregorio Piaia. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2009. 73–82. [On the political, humanist and religious aspects of Utopia.]

See also Utopia: Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, and Reform and Utopia: Social and Political Philosophy

More's Utopian Embassy of 1515 and the Composition of Utopia

  1. Surtz, Edward. St Thomas More and his Utopian Embassy of 1515. Catholic Historical Review 39 (1953/4): 272–97. [Geritz R405; Wentworth 643. The standard account of More's 1515 diplomatic mission.]
  2. Hexter, J. H. Introduction: The Composition of Utopia, and Appendix A: More's Visit to Antwerp in 1515. Utopia. Vol. 4 of The Yale Edition of the Complete Works of St. Thomas More. Ed. Edward Surtz and J. H. Hexter. New Haven: Yale UP, 1965. xv–xxiii, 571–76. Rpt. as Appendices A and B to Chapter 2: The Utopian Vision: Thomas More. Utopia and Its Historical Milieux. The Vision of Politics on the Eve of the Reformation: More, Machiavelli, and Seyssel. New York: Basic Books; London: Allen Lane, 1973. 138–49.
  3. Starnes, Colin. Appendix: On Hexter's Account of More's Visit to Antwerp in 1515. The New Republic: A Commentary on Book I of More's Utopia Showing Its Relation to Plato's Republic. Waterloo, Ont.: Wilfrid Laurier UP, 1990. 109–11.
  4. O'Brien, Brian. J. H. Hexter and the Text of Utopia: A Reappraisal. Moreana 110 (1992): 19–32. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana110pages19-32.pdf [Sum.: p. 32; Geritz R305. In opposition to Hexter, O'Brien suggests that More kept revising Book II as he went along, making it less of a political statement, and strengthening the complex ironies of the work.]

Prefatory Letters and Parerga

  1. Pons, Émile. Les langues imaginaires dans le voyage utopique. Un précurseur: Thomas Morus. [1930] See Names in Utopia and the Utopian Language.
  2. Marsh, T. N. The First Bishop of Utopia: An Attempt at Identification. Notes and Queries ns 4:1 (1957): 30–32. [Geritz R258.]
  3. Surtz, Edward. More's Apologia pro Utopia sua. Modern Language Quarterly 19 (1958): 319–24. [Geritz R402; Wentworth 531.]
  4. Allen, Peter R. Utopia and European Humanism: the Function of the Prefatory Letters and Verses. Studies in the Renaissance 10 (1963): 91–107. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 120–136. [Sum.: G. M. Moreana 2 (1964): 111–112; Geritz R009; Wentworth 527; Sullivan S2:3.]
  5. Derrett, J. Duncan M. The Utopian Alphabet. Moreana 12 (1966): 61–66. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana12pages61-65.pdf [Geritz R092; Wentworth 408.]
  6. O'Grady, Walter. A Note on Busleyden's Letter to Thomas More. Moreana 11 (1966): 33–38. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana11pages33-38.pdf [Geritz R306; Wentworth 530.]
  7. McKinnon, Dana G. The Marginal Glosses in More's Utopia: The Character of the Commentator. Renaissance Papers, 1970. Ed. D. G. Donovan. Columbus, SC: The Southeastern Renaissance Conference: 1971. 11–19. [Sum.: McKinnon R277; Wentworth 529.]
  8. Blom, Nicolas van der. 2 x unus = ?? (à propos de l'Utopie 42/5 et de Allen II 467.17). Moreana 36 (1972): 39–46. [Geritz R047. Two notes: 1. Erasmus as Bishop of Utopia; 2. on More's Letter to Erasmus, 20th Sept. 1516 about Utopia.]
  9. Blom, Nicolas van der. Érasme évêque d'Utopie. Moreana 59/60 (1978): 31–34. [Suggests that Erasmus's Declamatiuncula (LB IV: 623–624) is a mock-acceptance speech for the position of Bishop of Utopia. See also Germain Marc'hadour, and Henri Gibaud, Election ou ordination? in Religion and Theology.]
  10. Carpenter, Nan C. St, Thomas More and Music: Busleiden's Organ. [1978] See Thomas More and Music
  11. Schoeck, Richard J. The Ironic and the Prophetic: Towards Reading More's Utopia as a Multidisciplinary Work. Quincentennial Essays on St. Thomas More. Ed. Michael J. Moore. Boone, NC: Albion, 1978. 124–34. Rev. vers. as More's Utopia and Intertextuality. Intertextuality and Renaissance Texts. Gratia, Bamberger Schriften zur Renaissanceforschung 12. Bamberg: H. Kaiser-Verlag, 1984. 83–105. [Geritz R358 and R361; Wentworth 630. Analyses Budé's letter to Lupset in the Utopia parerga.]
  12. Wooden, Warren W. A Reconsideration of the parerga of Thomas More's Utopia. Quincentennial Essays on St. Thomas More. Ed. Michael J. Moore. Boone, NC: Albion, 1978. 151–60. [Geritz R442; Wentworth 533.]
  13. Kouskoff, Georges. IUS, FAS, AEQUUM: analyse de mots-clés. Moreana 73 (1982): 109–10. [On certain doublets in Budé's Prefatory Letter.]
  14. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. My Dear Peter: The Ars Poetica and Hermeneutics for More's Utopia. Angers: Éditions Moreana, 1983. [Geritz R270; Wentworth 528.]
    Review(s):
    1. Jacques Gury, Moreana 77 (1983): 49–51.
    2. Arthur F. Kinney, Moreana 78 (1983): 25–28.
    3. Arthur F. Kinney, Renaissance Quarterly 40 (1987): 121–23.
    4. Philip Sheldrake, Heythrop Journal 27 (1986): 323.
  15. Astell, Ann W. Rhetorical Strategy and the Fiction of Audience in More's Utopia. [1985] See Rhetoric, Fiction and Poetics.
  16. Truchet, Sybil. The Eutopians. Cahiers Elisabethains 28 (1985): 17–22. [Geritz R417; Wentworth 532. On the Christian Humanist Eutopian authors of the Prefatory Letters to Utopia.]
  17. Wooden, Warren W., and J. N. Wall. Thomas More and the Painter's Eye: Visual Perspective and Artistic Purpose in More's Utopia. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies 15 (1985): 231–63. [Geritz R449.]
  18. Bleiler, E. F. Pieter Gillis and More's Utopia. Extrapolation 27 (1986): 304–19.
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 97 (1988): 112–14.
  19. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. Mendacium Dicere and Mentiri: A Utopian Crux. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Sanctandreani. Proceedings of the Fifth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies: St. Andrews, 24 August to 1 September 1982. Ed. I. D. McFarlane. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 38. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1986. 449–57. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 51–63. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/sanctaactaconvent00inteuoft [Geritz R267; Wentworth 478.]
  20. Garanderie, Marie-Madeleine de la. Guillaume Budé lecteur de l'Utopie. Miscellanea Moreana: Essays for Germain Marc'hadour. Moreana 100: Volume XXVI Mélanges Marc'hadour. Ed. Clare M. Murphy, Henri Gibaud and Mario A. Di Cesare. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 61. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1989. 327–38. [Sum.: Moreana 98/99 (1988): 161, 255–56; Geritz R150.]
  21. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. More's Utopia and Its Parerga (1516–1518). Europa: Wiege des Humanismus und der Reformation [Europe: Cradle of Humanism and the Reformation]. 5 Internationales Symposion der Amici Thomas Mori 20. bis 27. Mai 1995 in Mainz. Dokumentation. Ed. Hermann Boventer and Uwe Baumann For the Thomas Morus Gesellschaft. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1997. 183–95. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 133–148.
  22. Billingsley, Dale. Halfhearted Busleyden. Moreana 122 (1995): 49–55. Online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana122pages49-55.pdf [Sum.: pp. 119–20; Geritz R041.]
  23. Schroeder, Karl G. Jerome de Busleyden and Thomas More. Moreana 121 (1995): 3–10. [Sum.: p. 117; Geritz F301. On More's meeting with Busleyden in 1515, and on Busleyden's prefatory letter to Utopia.]
  24. Schoeck, R. J. Thomas More and the Book: Utopia as Book. Thomas More . . . and More: Freundesgabe für / Liber Amicorum for Hubertus Schulte Herbrüggen. Edited by Christoph M. Peters and Friedrich-K. Unterweg. Frankfort am Main; New York: Peter Lang, 2002. 89–106. [Summ.: Gerhard Helmstaedter, Moreana 156 (2003): 112.]
  25. Baker, David Weil. Ruin and Utopia. Moreana 155 (2003): 49–66. Online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana155pages49-66.pdf [Sum.: pp.49–50. On Busleyden's Prefatory Letter to Utopia on on his and More's shared antiquarian interests.]
  26. Kinney, Arthur. Utopia's First Readers. Challenging Humanism: Essays in Honor of Dominic Baker-Smith. Ed. Ton Hoenselaars, and Arthur F. Kinney. Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press, 2005. 23–53. [Sum.: Ton Hoenselaars, p.13. On the parerga and More's early humanist readers, and on changes in reading in the Elizabethan Period.]
  27. Smith, Stephen W. On The Second Letter to Giles: A Portrait of the Reader as a Sharp-Sighted Man. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006): 82–83. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/SWS_remarks.pdf
  28. Burstein, Stanley M. The Source of the Utopian Alphabet: a Suggestion. Notes and Queries ns 56 (2009): 26–27. [Suggests a source in Diodorus Siculus' summary of Iambulus.]
  29. Vielle, M. Christophe. La langue de l'île d'Utopie : les Indes orientales vues des Flandres à la Renaissance. See Geographical Sources. [2013]
  30. Aretoulakis, Emmanouil. The Prefatory/Postscript Letters to St. Thomas More's Utopia: The Culture of Seeing as a Reality-Conferring Strategy. Journal of Early Modern Studies [Firenze UP] 3 (Mar. 2014): 91–113. (DOI)

Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, Humanism and Reform

  1. Lehmberg, Stanford E. English Humanists, the Reformation, and the Problem of Counsel. Archiv für Reformationsgeschichte 52 (1961): 74–91. [More, Elyot and Starkey on the problem of counsel.]
  2. Hexter, J. H. Utopia and Geneva. Action and Conviction in Early Modern Europe. Ed. T. K. Rabb and J. E. Seigel. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1969. 77–89. Rpt. in The Vision of Politics on the Eve of the Reformation: More, Machiavelli, and Seyssel. New York: Basic Books; London: Allen Lane, 1973. 107–17. [Geritz R195; Wentworth 447. Hexter treats Utopia as a straight-forward program. See Dermott Fenlon, England and Europe: Utopia and its aftermath, for a corrective to Hexter's rather simpleminded view of Calvin's Geneva as the embodiment of More's utopian reform program.]
  3. Davis, J. C. More, Morton, and the Politics of Accommodation. Journal of British Studies 9:2 (1970): 27–49. [Geritz R081; Wentworth 586. On More's treatment of Morton in Richard III and the Utopia.]
  4. Johnson, Robbin S. The Argument for Reform in More's Utopia. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 123–34. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages123-134.pdf [Geritz R206; Wentworth 605.]
  5. Khanna, Lee Cullen. Utopia: The Case for Open-mindedness in the Commonwealth. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 91–105. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages91-106.pdf Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 249–263. [Geritz R218; Wentworth 610. The consistent theme of Utopia is the importance of open-mindedness for the improvement of the social order.]
  6. Quattrocki, Ed. Injustice, not Councilorship: The Theme of Book One of Utopia. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 19–28. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages19-28.pdf [Geritz R330; Wentworth 535.]
  7. Hexter, J. H. Thomas More and the Problem of Counsel. Quincentennial Essays on St. Thomas More. Ed. Michael J. Moore. Boone, NC: Albion, 1978. 55–66. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 56–67. [Geritz R193; Wentworth 534.]
  8. Jones, Emrys. Commoners and Kings: Book One of More's Utopia. Medieval Studies for J. A. W. Bennett: Aetatis Suae LXX. Ed. P. L. Heyworth. Oxford, Clarendon P, 1981. 255–72. [Geritz R208; Wentworth 500.
    Review(s):
    1. Piero Boitani, Studies in the Aage of Chaucer 5 (1983): 168–69.
    2. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 78 (1983): 31–32.
  9. Ludwig, Hans-Werner. Thomas More's Utopia: Historical Setting and Literary Effectiveness. [1984] See Genre and Interpretation.
  10. Perlette, John M. Of Sites and Parasites: The Centrality of the Marginal Anecdote in Book 1 of More's Utopia. English Literary History 54 (1987): 231–52. [Geritz R322; Wentworth 502.]
  11. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. War Games in Utopia. [1989] See War and Peace in Utopia.
  12. Slavin, Arthur J. Platonism and the Problem of Counsel in Utopia. in Reformation, Humanism, and Revolution. Vol. 1 of Proceedings of the Folger Institute Center for the History of British Political Thought. Ed. Gordon J. Schochet. 6 vols. Washington, DC: Folger Institute, Folger Shakespeare Library: 1990. I: 207–234. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 379–406. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 123/24 (1995): 149–50.]
  13. Starnes, Colin. The New Republic. [1990] See Utopia and Plato.
  14. Slavin, Arthur J. Consilium et timor mortis: On Speaking, Writing and Silence in Utopia. Renaissance and Reformation ns 16:3 (1992): 17–30. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 268; Geritz R378.]
  15. Lakowski, Romuald I. The Dialogue in Book I of Utopia. Sir Thomas More and the Art of Dialogue. Diss. U of British Columbia, 1993. 77–123. Online at http://projects.chass.utoronto.ca/emls/iemls/work/chapters/utop-chp.html [1996] [Discusses the Parerga, Book I and the Conclusion to Book II.]
  16. Logan, George M. Utopia and Deliberative Rhetoric. Moreana 31: 118/119 (1994): 103–20. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana118-119pages103-120.pdf Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 485–502. [Sum.: pp. 293–94; Geritz R236. A detailed examination of Book I and its relation to the topoi of deliberative rhetoric especially honestas and utilitas.]
  17. Shephard, Robert. Utopia, Utopia's Neighbours, Utopia, and Europe. [1995] See War and Peace in Utopia.
  18. Totaro, Rebecca. Bubonic Plague in Utopia and Old World Implications. QWERTY [Pau, France] 8 (1998): 67–85. A condensed version published as Thomas More's Pestilence in Parenthesis. Suffering in Paradise: The Bubonic Plague in English Literature from More to Milton. Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne UP, 2005. 69–86.
  19. Vieira, Maria de Fátima. Algumas reflexões sobre a função do Livro I em Utopia de Sir Thomas More. Revista da Faculdade de Letras do Porto: Estudos 1 (2001): 51–***.
  20. Nelson, Julia R. Sir Thomas More, Christian Humanism and Utopia. Archive: A Journal of Undergraduate History [University of Wisconsin-Madison] 7 (2004): 59–91. Online at http://uwho.rso.wisc.edu/Archive/Julia%20Nelson.pdf
  21. Kearney, James. Idleness. Cultural Reformations: Medieval and Renaissance in Literary History. Ed. Brian Cummings and James Simpson. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010. 570–88. [Deals mainly with the problems of Idleness and sturdy beggary in Book I of Utopia.]
  22. Maczelka, Csaba. Sermo, Colloquium, Decorum: The Dialogic Roots of Sir Thomas More’s Utopia. ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes and Reviews 27:3 (2014): 97–104. Eprint online at http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/UNRBBCuXBkrRgdqvmCtu/full (doi)
  23. Houston, Chloë. Copious Discourse: Utopia and Dialogue. The Renaissance Utopia: Dialogue, Travel and the Ideal Society. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2014. 15–40.
  24. Benestad, J. Brian. Thomas More's Utopia and Catholic Social Doctrine. Thomas More: Why Patron of Statesmen? Edited by Travis Curtright. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2015. 75–93. [Sum.: pp.2–3. An analysis of Book I.]
  25. Stoner, James R., Jr. Images of the Statesman in Utopia. [2015] See Utopia: Social and Political Philosophy.

See also Utopia: Dialogue, Dialectic and Drama and Utopia: Social and Political Philosophy

Raphael Hythloday as Narrator and Persona More

  1. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. Thomas More, Raphael Hythlodaeus, and the Angel Raphael. Studies in English Literature 9 (1965): 21–38. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 17–36. [Geritz R273; Wentworth 480.]
  2. Sylvester, Richard S. Si Hythlodaeo Credimus: Vision and Revision in Thomas More's Utopia. Soundings 51 (1968): 272–89. Rpt. in Essential Articles for the Study of Thomas More. Ed. Richard S. Sylvester and Germain Marc'hadour. Hamden, CT: Archon, 1977. 290–301, 630–31. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 201–218. [Geritz R412; Wentworth 526.]
  3. Allen, Ward S. Hythloday and the Root of all Evil. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 51–60. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages51-60.pdf [Geritz R010; Wentworth 519; Sullivan S2:3–4.]
  4. Coogan, Robert. Nunc vivo ut volo. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 29–45. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages51-60.pdf [Geritz R073; Wentworth 520.]
  5. Seeber, Hans Ulrich. Hythloday as Preacher and a Possible Debt to Macrobius. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 71–86. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages71-86.pdf [Geritz R368; Wentworth 415. Pp. 71–78 deals with use of the rhetoric of preaching; pp. 79–86 deals with the influence of the description of the Antipodes in Cicero's In somnium Scipionis and Macrobius' Commentary.]
  6. Gury, Jacques. Raphaël Hythlodée et Isaïe. Moreana 41 (1974): 107.
  7. Löffler, Arno. Die Figur des Hythlodaeus in Thomas Mores Utopia. Germanisch-Romanische Monatsschrift 24 (1974): 168–82. [Sullivan S2:87; Geritz R233.]
  8. Weiner, Andrew D. Raphael's Eutopia and More's Utopia: Christian Humanism and the Limits of Reason. Huntington Library Quarterly 39 (1975): 1–27. [Sum.: James Perrin Warren, Moreana 58 (1978): 82; Geritz R426; Wentworth 517.]
  9. Wooden, Warren W. Satiric Strategy in More's Utopia: The Case of Raphael Hythloday. [1979] See Irony, Paradox, Humour and Satire.
  10. Hester, M. Thomas. The Letter Killeth, but the Spirit Giveth Life: Raphael Hythlodaeus and the Law of Love. Scholia Satyrica [Tampa, University of South Florida, Dept. of English] 6 (1980): 3–8. [Geritz R188.]
  11. Rudat, Wolfgang E. H. Thomas More, Hythloday, and Odysseus: An Anatomy of Utopia. American Imago 37 (1980): 38–48. [Sum.: p. 47–48; Geritz R347. A psychoanalytic study.]
  12. Weiner, Andrew D. Erasmus, More and the Shape of Persuasion. Moreana 65/66 (1980): 87–98. [Geritz R425; Wentworth 493.]
  13. Hammond, Eugene R. Hythloday's Questions: Clues to his Character? Or Provokers of Thought? Moreana 70 (1981): 25–27. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana70pages25-27.pdf [Geritz R180.]
  14. Rudat, Wolfgang E. H. More's Raphael Hythloday: Missing the Point in Utopia Once More. Moreana 69 (1981): 41–64. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana69pages41-64.pdf [Geritz R345; Wentworth 524.]
  15. Engeman, Thomas. Hythloday's Utopia and More's England: An Interpretation of Thomas More's Utopia. Journal of Politics 44:1 (1982): 131–149.
  16. Surtz, Edward. Like a Fountain Stirred. Ed. Elizabeth McCutcheon. Moreana 77 (1983): 53–65. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana77pages31-34.pdf [Geritz R399; Wentworth 640. On the role of Hythloday, the symbol of the council and the art of drama in Utopia.]
  17. Mortimer, Anthony. Hythlodaeus and Persona More: The Narrative Voices of Utopia. Cahiers Elisabethains 28 (1985): 23–35. [Geritz R294; Wentworth 522.]
  18. Opanasets, Nicholas. More Platonism. Review of Politics 51 (1989): 412–34. [Sum.: p.412. On Raphael Hythloday and Socrates.]
  19. Wilson, N. G. The Name Hythlodaeus. [1992] See Names in Utopia and the Utopian Language.
  20. Miller, Clarence H. Style and meaning in More's Utopia: Hythloday's Sentences and Diction. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Hafniensis. Proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies, Copenhagen, 12 August to 17 August 1991. Ed. R. Schnur, et al. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 120. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1994. 675–83. Rpt. in Miller, Clarence H. Humanism and Style: Essays on Erasmus and More. Intro. by Jerry Harp. Bethlehem: Lehigh UP, 2011. 71–79, 133–135. Condensed version (omitting Latin in quotes) rpt. in Miller, Clarence H., trans. Utopia. A New Translation with an Introduction. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001. xi–xix. 2nd ed. 2014 With an Afterword by Jerry Harp. [Sum.: (2011) pp.15–16.] Online at http://www.archive.org/details/hafniactaconvent00inteuoft [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 127/28 (1996): 109; Geritz R286. Miller argues Hythloday's brief sentences and universalist diction in praise of Utopia are indicative of his narrow-mindedness and naiveté (George M. Logan).]
  21. Marc'hadour, Germain. Raphaël Hythlodée: le portugais découvreur de l'Utopie. QWERTY [Pau, France] 8 (1998): 55–65.
  22. Weiner, Andrew D. Taking More Seriously: Humanism, Cultural Criticism, and the Possibility of the Past. Challenging Humanism: Essays in Honor of Dominic Baker-Smith. Ed. Ton Hoenselaars, and Arthur F. Kinney. Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press, 2005. 54–74. [Sum.: p.13. Although Weiner discusses Greenblatt and Skinner at the beginning, the main focus of his article is on the importance of Persona More in Utopia.]
  23. Schlueter, Nathan. Sir Thomas More's Noble Lie. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006):170–76. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Schlueter.pdf
  24. Galimidi, José Luis. Barbarus durum reijcit, quicquid non est plane barbarum: The political problem of transmitting true principles in Thomas More's Utopia. Ideal Constitutions in the Renaissance: Papers for the Munich February 2006 Conference. Ed. Heinrich C. Kuhn, and Diana Stanciu. Renaissance Intellectual History, Band 1. Edited Heinrich C. Kuhn, Sachiko Kusukawa, Marianne Pade and Gregorio Piaia. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2009. 91–111. [On Hythloday and Persona More.]
  25. Stoner, James R., Jr. Images of the Statesman in Utopia. [2015] See Utopia: Social and Political Philosophy.

The Conclusion of Utopia

  1. Allen, Ward S. The Tone of More's Farewell to Utopia: A Reply to J. H. Hexter. Moreana 51 (1976): 108–18. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana51pages108-118.pdf [Geritz R014; Wentworth 463; Sullivan S2:4.]
  2. Hexter, J. H. Intention, Words and Meaning: The Case of More's Utopia. New Literary History 6 (1976) 529–41. [Geritz R190; Wentworth 469. A Response to Allen above.]
  3. White, Thomas I. Festivitas, Utilitas, et Opes: The Concluding Irony and Philosophical Purpose of Thomas More's Utopia. Quincentennial Essays on St. Thomas More. Ed. Michael J. Moore. Boone, NC: Albion, 1978. 134–50. [Geritz R429; Wentworth 647.]
  4. Mezciems, Jenny. Utopia and the Thing which is not: More, Swift, and Others Lying Idealists. [1982] See More and Swift.
  5. McCabe, Richard A. Ut publica est opinio: An Utopian Irony. Neophilologus 72 (1988): 633–39. [Geritz R262.]

Literary Studies

Dialogue, Dialectic and Drama

  1. Williamson, George. Sir Thomas More's View of Drama. Modern Language Notes 43 (1928): 294–96.
  2. Campbell, W. E. More's Utopia. [1929] See Social and Political Philosophy.
  3. Bevington, David M. The Dialogue in Utopia: Two Sides of the Question. Studies in Philology 58 (1961): 496–509. Rpt. in More's Utopia And its Critics. Ed. Ligeia Gallagher. Chicago: Scott, Foresman and Company, 1964. 160–70. Rpt. as The Divided Mind. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliff, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 76–87. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 57–70. [Geritz R039; Wentworth 497; Sullivan S2:15.]
  4. Crossett, John. More and Seneca. Philological Quarterly 40 (1961): 577–80. [Geritz R077.]
  5. Schoeck, Richard J. A Nursery of Correct and Useful Institutions: On Reading More's Utopia as Dialogue. Moreana 22 (1969): 19–32. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana22pages19-32.pdf Rpt. in Essential Articles for the Study of Thomas More. Ed. Richard S. Sylvester and Germain Marc'hadour. Hamden, CT: Archon, 1977. 281–89, 627–30. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 219–232. [Geritz R362; Wentworth 631.]
  6. Bertagnoni, Marialisa. Discordia concors: Utopia e Il Dialogo del conforto. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 183–89. [Sum.: (Fr.) G.M. p. 189. More used the dialogue form in both Utopia and the Dialogue of Comfort to dramatise inner conflicts.]
  7. Cavanaugh, John R. Utopia: Sound from Nowhere. Moreana 35 (1972): 27–38. [Geritz R068; Wentworth 467. On elements of orality in the text of More's Utopia.]
  8. Brückmann, Patricia. In familiari colloquio: An Intervention in Utopia. Familiar Colloquy: Essays Presented to Arthur Edward Barker. Ed. Patricia Brückmann. Ottawa, Ont.: Oberon Press (for U of Western Ontario), 1978. 9–14. [Sum.: G. M. Moreana 91/92 (1986): 102; Geritz R059.]
  9. Schaeffer, John D. Socratic Method in More's Utopia. [1981] See Utopia and Plato.
  10. Blaim, Artur. More's Utopia: Persuasion or Polyphony? Moreana 73 (1982): 5–20. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana73pages5-20.pdf [Geritz R045; Wentworth 498.]
  11. Surtz, Edward. Like a Fountain Stirred. [1983] See Raphael Hythloday as Narrator.
  12. Gordon, Walter M. Dialogue, Myth and More's Utopian Drama. Cithara 25:1 (1985): 19–34. [Geritz R159; Wentworth 499.]
  13. Perlette, John M. Irresolution as Solution: Rhetoric and the Unresolved Debate in Book I of More's Utopia. [1987] See Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, and Reform.
  14. McLean, Andrew M. Thomas More's Utopia as Dialogue and City Encomium. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Guelpherbytani: Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies: Wolfenbuttel, 12 August to 16 August 1985. Ed. Stella P. Revard, Fidel Rädle, Mario A. Di Cesare. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 53. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1988. 91–97. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/guelphactaconven00inteuoft [Geritz R279; Wentworth 514.]
  15. Grace, Damian. Utopia: A Dialectical Interpretation. Miscellanea Moreana: Essays for Germain Marc'hadour. Moreana 100: Volume XXVI Mélanges Marc'hadour. Ed. Clare M. Murphy, Henri Gibaud and Mario A. Di Cesare. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 61. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1989. 273–302. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana100pages274-302.pdf [Sum.: Moreana 98/99 (1988): 160, 254–55; Geritz R161; Wentworth 468.]
  16. Wegemer, Gerard B. The Rhetoric of Opposition in Thomas More's Utopia: Giving Form to Competing Philosophies. [1990] See Rhetoric, Fiction and Poetics.
  17. Zell, Rosmarie. Dialogue as Way to Peace in the Utopia of Thomas More. History of European Ideas 20 (1995): 899–905. [Geritz R450.]

Rhetoric, Fiction and Poetics

  1. Kinney, Arthur F. Rhetoric as Poetic: Humanist Fiction in the Renaissance. English Literary History 43 (1976): 413–43. [Geritz R220; Wentworth 474. On Erasmus' Praise of Folly, More's Utopia and Gasciogne's The Adventures of Master F. J.]
  2. Altman, Joel B. Propedeutic for Drama: Questions as Fiction. [1978] See More, Castiglione and Sidney.
  3. Kinney, Arthur F. Rhetoric and Poetic in Thomas More's Utopia. Malibu: Undena, 1979. [Geritz R219; Wentworth 473.]
    Review(s):
    1. Elizabeth McCutcheon, Moreana 69 (1981): 111–13.
  4. Davis, Walter R. Thomas More's Utopia as Fiction. Centennial Review 24 (1980): 249–68. [Sum.: G.M. and Henri Gibaud, Moreana 69 (1981): 113 + 79/80 (1983): 143; Geritz R084; Wentworth 508. Utopia as a humanist fiction: a new way, a hypothetical way, of thinking about life.]
  5. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. My Dear Peter: The Ars Poetica and Hermeneutics for More's Utopia. [1983] See Prefatory Letters and Parerga.
  6. New, Peter. Fiction and Purpose in Utopia, Rasselas, The Mill on the Floss and Women in Love. London: MacMillan, 1985. 12–82, 308–10. [Geritz R303; Wentworth 620.]
  7. Astell, Ann W. Rhetorical Strategy and the Fiction of Audience in More's Utopia. Centennial Review 29 (1985): 302–19. [Geritz R017; Wentworth 464. On the Parerga and on More's contemporary humanist audience.]
  8. Kinney, Arthur F. Encomium Sapientiae: Thomas More and Utopia. Humanist Poetics: Thought, Rhetoric, and Fiction in Sixteenth-century England. Amherst, MA: U of Massachusetts P, 1986. 57–88, 461–68. [Geritz K006.]
  9. Perlette, John M. Irresolution as Solution: Rhetoric and the Unresolved Debate in Book I of More's Utopia. Texas Studies in Language and Literature 29 (1987): 28–53. [Geritz R321; Wentworth 485.]
  10. Wegemer, Gerard B. The Rhetoric of Opposition in Thomas More's Utopia: Giving Form to Competing Philosophies. Philosophy and Rhetoric 23 (1990): 288–306. Rev. vers. rpt. in Thomas More on Statesmanship. Washington, DC: Catholic U of America P, 1996. 91–108, 224–226. [Geritz R424; Wentworth 492.]
  11. Baker-Smith, Dominic. The Location of Utopia: Narrative Devices in a Renaissance Fiction. Addressing Frank Kermode: Essays in Criticism and Interpretation. Ed. Margaret Tudeau-Clayton and Martin Warner. London: MacMillan P, 1991. 109–23.
  12. Di Luca, Adolfo. La retorica della persuasione nell'Utopia di Thomas More. Il Lettore di Provincia 23:81 (1991): 75–93. [Geritz R096.]
  13. Baker-Smith, Dominic. Living in Two Cities: The Status of Fiction in More's Utopia. Thomas Morus Jahrbuch 1992. 62–70.
  14. Logan, George M. Utopia and Deliberative Rhetoric. [1994] See Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, and Reform.

Irony, Paradox, Humour and Satire

  1. Heiserman, A. R. Satire in the Utopia. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 78 (1963): 163–74. Rpt. in Die Englische Satire. ed. Wolfgang Weiss. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchges, 1982. 172–200. [Sum.: G. M. Moreana 2 (1964): 109–110; Geritz R185; Wentworth 510.]
  2. Barnes, W. J. Irony and the English Apprehension of Renewal. Queens Quarterly 73 (1966): 357–76. [Geritz R030; Wentworth 465. On irony in More's Utopia and Sidney's Apology.]
  3. Vickers, Brian. The Satiric Structure of Gulliver's Travels and More's Utopia. [1968] See More and Swift.
  4. Wooden, Warren W. Sir Thomas More, Satirist: A Study of the Utopia as Menippean Satire. Diss. Vanderbilt U, Nashville, Tennessee, 1971. [Geritz R444; DAI 32/2 (1971): 938A.]
  5. Wooden, Warren W. Thomas More and Lucian: A Study in Satiric Influence and Technique. [1972] See Utopia and Lucian.
  6. Nagel, Alan F. Lies and the Limitable Inane: Contradiction in More's Utopia. Renaissance Quarterly 26 (1973): 173–80. [Geritz R301; Wentworth 483.]
  7. Stevens, Irma N. Aesthetic Distance in the Utopia. Moreana 43/44 (1974): 13–24. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana43-44pages13-24.pdf [Geritz R386; Wentworth 488.]
  8. Wooden, Warren W. Anti-Scholastic Satire in Sir Thomas More's Utopia. Sixteenth Century Journal 8:Supp. (1977): 29–45. [Sum.: James Perrin Warren, Moreana 58 (1978): 84; Geritz R441; Wentworth 494.]
  9. Wooden, Warren W. Satiric Strategy in More's Utopia: The Case of Raphael Hythloday. Renaissance Papers. 1977: 1–9. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 63/2 (1979): 102; Geritz R443; Wentworth 495.]
  10. Kennedy, William J. The Style of Ironic Discourse: More's Utopia. Rhetorical Norms in Renaissance Literature. New Haven: Yale UP, 1978. 94–105, 211–12. [Geritz R214; Wentworth 471.]
  11. White, Thomas I. Festivitas, Utilitas, et Opes: The Concluding Irony and Philosophical Purpose of Thomas More's Utopia. [1978] See The Conclusion of Utopia.
  12. Wooden, Warren W. The Wit of Thomas More's Utopia. Studies in the Humanities 7:2 (1979): 43–51. [Geritz R448; Wentworth 496.]
  13. Voisine, Jacques. Fiction littéraire et satire politique: l'Utopie de Thomas More à l'origine d'un nouveau genre. Cahiers de l'U. E. R. Froissart [Université de Valenciennes] no. 4 (1980): 61–72. [Sum.: Jacques Gury, Moreana 73 (1982): 61.]
  14. Blaim, Artur. The Genre Structure of More's Utopia and the Tradition of Carnivalized Literature. [1983] See Genre and Interpretation.
  15. Rudat, Wolfgang E. H. Classical Allusion and Dissociating Irony in More's Utopia. The Mutual Commerce: Masters of Classical Allusion in English and American Literature. Heidelberg: Winter, 1985. 49–58.
  16. McCabe, Richard A. Ut publica est opinio: An Utopian Irony. [1988] See The Conclusion of Utopia.
  17. Fox, Alistair. Paradox Equivocation: The Self-Subversiveness of Thomas More's Utopia. Politics and Literature in the Reigns of Henry VII and Henry VIII. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1989. 92–107. [Geritz R138.]
  18. Rossetti, Lorenzo. Les paradoxes d'Utopia. Moreana 103 (1990): 41–48. [Sum.: pp. 47–48; Geritz R343.]
  19. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. Puns, Paradoxes, and Heuristic Inquiry: The De Servis Section of More's Utopia. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Torontonensis. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies: Toronto, 8 August to 13 August 1988. Ed. Alexander Dalzell, Charles Fantazzi, Richard J. Schoeck. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 86. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1991. 91–99. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 91–100. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/toronactaconvent00inteuoft [Geritz R271.]
  20. Reilly, Edward J. Irony in Gulliver's Travels and Utopia. [1992] See More and Swift.
  21. Bénéton, Phillippe. L'Utopie expliquée par Thomas More. See Dialogues, Colloquys, and Fictional Letters. [2004]
  22. Gilman, Donald. The reality of paradox: reality, fantasy, and Thomas More's Utopia. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Upsalienis: Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies (Uppsala 2009). Ed. Astrid Steiner-Weber. 2 vols. Leiden: Brill, 2012. I: 405–414.

Latin Style

  1. Fyfe, W. Hamilton. Tacitus's Germania and More's Utopia. [1936] See Other Classical Sources (Excluding Plato).
  2. Surtz, Edward. Appendix B: Vocabulary and Diction in Utopia. Utopia. Vol. 4 of The Yale Edition of the Complete Works of St. Thomas More. Ed. Edward Surtz and J. H. Hexter. New Haven: Yale UP, 1965. 577–82.
  3. Jennings, Vivien. The Latin editions of Sir Thomas More's Utopia: A study of their editiong and censorship. Diss. Catholic U of America, 1966.
  4. Monsuez, R. Le Latin de Thomas More dans Utopia. Annales publiées par la Faculté des lettres et sciences humaines de Toulouse, Hommages à Paul Dottin ns 2/1. Caliban 3 (1966): 35–78. [Geritz R289.]
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 11 (1966): 91–92.
  5. Surtz, Edward. Aspects of More's Latin Style in Utopia. Studies in the Renaissance 14 (1967): 93–109. [Geritz R394; Wentworth 489.]
  6. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. Denying the Contrary: More's Use of Litotes in the Utopia. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 107–21. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages107-122.pdf Rpt. in Essential Articles for the Study of Thomas More. Ed. Richard S. Sylvester and Germain Marc'hadour. Hamden, CT: Archon, 1977. 263–74, 623–5. Pp. 116–21 rpt. in Sir Thomas More: Utopia. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1975. 224–30. Rpt. 2nd ed. 1992. 224–29; 3rd ed. 2011. 220–28. [Geritz R265; Wentworth 476. See also McCutcheon's Some Notes on Litotes in Thomas More's The History of King Richard III. in Richard III: Literary Studies.]
  7. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. The Language of Utopian Negation: Book II of More's Utopia. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Bononiensis: Proceedings of the Fourth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies: Bologna, 26 August to 1 September 1979. Ed. Richard J. Schoeck. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 37. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1985. 510–19. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 37–50. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/bononactaconvent00inteuoft [Sum.: Seymour B. House, Moreana 95/96 (1987): 108; Geritz R266; Wentworth 477.]
  8. Malsbary, Gerald. Hythlodaeus' 464-word Marathon Sentence: How does it work? Moreana 51:195–196 (June 2014): 153–175. Online at http://thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana195-196pages153-175.pdf. [Sum.: pp.153–54. Analyses Hythoday's 464 word sentence at CW 4:86/31–90/22 on the Achorians.]

Names in Utopia and the Utopian Language

  1. Vossius, Gerardus Joannes. De Utopia Mori ac paradoxis in illa vocabulis agit. Opera omnia. 6 Vols. Amsterdam: P. and J. Blaeu, 1698. Vol. 4: 340–41. [Cf. Gibson 582.]
  2. Picton, J. A., et al. Sir Thomas More's Utopia. Notes and Queries 77 (1888): 101–02, 229–31, 371. [Argument about the origins of the name Utopia: Eutopia (Good-place) vs. Outopia (No-place).]
  3. Pons, Émile. Les langues imaginaires dans le voyage utopique. Un précurseur: Thomas Morus. Revue de littérature comparée 10 (1930): 589–607. [On the names in Utopia, includes an analysis of the Utopian Tetrastich in the Parerga.]
  4. Ryba, Bohumil. De Thomae Mori vocabulis Utopianis. Charisteria Thaddaeo Sinko oblata. Varsaviae-Wratislaviae: Sumptibus Societatis Philologiae Polonarum, 1951. 289–93. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 127/28 (1996): 104–105. See also Ryba's Czech translation of Utopia inOther Translations.]
  5. Schoeck, Richard J. Levels of Word-Play and Figurative Signification in More's Utopia. Notes and Queries ns 1 (1954): 512–13. [Geritz R359. On Abraxa and Almost an Island: A Suggested Allegorical Interpretation.]
  6. Simmonds, James D. More's Use of Names in Book II of Utopia. Die Neueren Sprachen ns 10 (1961): 282–84. [Geritz R372. Repeats (without knowing the original source in the Second Letter to Giles) the derivations given by More himself of the names in Book II of Utopia.]
  7. Allen, Ward. Speculations on St. Thomas More's Use of Hesychius. Philological Quarterly 46 (1967): 156–66. [Geritz R013; Wentworth 401; Sullivan S2:4. On the possible derivations of some Greek names in Utopia from Hesychius's Greek dictionary, and on their Gnostic origins.]
  8. Lassalle, Jean-Pierre. Quelques Hypothèses sur More et la Tradition. Moreana 18 (1968): 49–52. [On the names Abraxa and Raphael Hythloday.]
  9. Preston, Raymond. The Macarian King and the Eight Beatitudes. Moreana 50 (1976): 119. [makarios (blessed) is the Greek word used nine times in the Beatitudes (Matt. 5:3). The Macarian king embodies the first beatitude.]
  10. Herrmann, Léon. L'Utopien et le Lanternois. Les pseudonymes et les cryptogrammes français de Thomas More et de François Rabelais. Paris: Nizet, 1981.
    Review(s):
    1. Elizabeth McCutcheon, Moreana 73 (1982): 41–42.
    2. Jacques Voisine, Revue de littérature comparée 57 (1983): 113–14.
  11. Rudat, Wolfgang E. H. Thomas More and Hythloday: Some Speculations on Utopia. Bibliothèque d'Humanisme et Renaissance 43 (1981): 123–27. [Geritz R346; Wentworth 486.]
  12. Prévost, André. La Clef du Mystère Utopien. Moreana 73 (1982): 35–39. [A criticism of Herrmann's views.]
  13. Bleiler, E. F. Pieter Gillis and More's Utopia. [1986] See Prefatory Letters and Parerga.
  14. Romm, James. More's Strategy of Naming in the Utopia. Sixteenth Century Journal 20 (1991): 173–83. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 428–438. [Sum.: p.173; Geritz R340.]
  15. Starnes, Colin. Preface. The New Republic: A Commentary on Book I of More's Utopia Showing Its Relation to Plato's Republic. Waterloo, Ont.: Wilfrid Laurier UP, 1990. vii–xiii. [On the origins of the names syphogrant, tranibor and barzanes.]
  16. Wilson, N. G. The Name Hythlodaeus. Moreana 110 (1992): 33. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana110pages19-32.pdf Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 457. [Geritz R437. Suggests that the name may mean ironically mean hostile to nonsense or purveyor of nonsense.]
  17. Morrish, Jennifer. A Note on the Neo-Latin Sources for the word Utopia. [2001] See Humanism and Classical Political Philosophy
  18. Mancel, François. Jeux des mots grecs et gréco-latins dans L'Utopie de Thomas More: Les prétendues îles-soeurs et la pseudo-aporie. Signification silénique du vocable Utopie. Moreana 183/84 (2011): 225–46. [Sum.: pp.225–26.]

Utopian Animals: Sheep, Monkeys and Chickens

  1. Ingenbleek, Yves. Sir Thomas More on Imprinting. Animal Behavior 24 (1976): 16–17. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 55/56 (1977): 34. On CW4, 114/19–24.]
  2. Billingsley, Dale B. A Mare's Nest: Pliny, Mandeville and Hythloday on the Incubation of Eggs. Moreana 67/68 (1980): 80. [Geritz R042. On possible sources in Pliny and Mandeville.]
  3. Williams, Franklin B. Utopia's Chickens Come Home to Roost. Moreana 69 (1981): 77–78. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana69pages77-78.pdf [Geritz R433. On a possible source for More's account of the incubation of Utopian chickens in Bernard von Bredenbach's Peregrinatio in Terram Sanctam (1486).]
  4. Renkl, Margaret. Did Utopian Chickens Dance? Moreana 77 (1983): 35–38. [Renkl writes about her own childhood experiences of incubating a chicken, and of her discovery of imprinting behaviour.]
  5. Morgan, Nicole S. Le petit singe cercopithèque mangeur de bibliothèque. Moreana 118/19 (1994): 141–153. [Sum.: pp.296–97; Geritz R293. More about the Library than the Monkey.]
  6. Burlinson, Christopher. Humans and Animals in Thomas More's Utopia. Utopian studies 19:1 (2008): 25–48.
  7. Doyle, Charles Clay. Sheep Eat Men: A Retrospective Proverb. Moreana 51:197–198 (Dec. 2014): 167–79. [Sum.: pp.167–68. Traces the history of the expressions Sheep are eating men and Sheep devour men, which though not actually found in Utopia are based on CW 4:64–66. See also Moreana XIII:51 (1976):63.

Utopia: Gold and Chamber Pots

  1. Crossett, John. More and Lucian. [1957] See Utopia and Lucian.
  2. Allen, Ward. Some Remarks on Gold. Moreana 18 (1968): 5–6. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana18pages5-6.pdf [Geritz R012. On the symbolic meaning of gold in the Bible and its inversion in Utopia.]
  3. Doyle, Charles Clay. Utopia and the Proper Place of Gold: Classical Sources and Renaissance Analogues. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 47–49. Rpt. Gazette Thomas More 33/2 (Spring 2016): 12–13. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages47-50.pdf [Geritz R113; Wentworth 407. On the accounts of the discovery of gold after the end of the Golden Age in Ovid, Horace, Boethius, Spenser, Fletcher, and Milton.]
  4. Doyle, Charles Clay. Poggio and the Anemolian Ambassadors, and Ambassadors in Chains: A Pun in Utopia? Moreana 58 (1978): 61–63 and 59/60 (1978): 90. Rpt. Gazette Thomas More 33/2 (Spring 2016): 13–14. [Geritz R112 and R109. On a possible source for the account of the golden chains of the Anemolian ambassadors (CW4, 152–56) in Poggio Bracciolini's Facetiae (1470).]
  5. Derrett, J. Duncan M. The Utopians' Stoic Chamber-Pots. Moreana 73 (1982): 75–76. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 167–168. [Geritz R093. On Plutarch as a possible source for CW4, 152/6–8.]
  6. Doyle, Charles Clay. The Utopians' Therapeutic Chamber-Pots. Moreana 73 (1982): 75. [Geritz R114. On the Freudian implications of golden chamber pots.]
  7. Wilson, Katharina M. An Affront to Silver and Gold: Tertullian's De cultu feminarum and More's Utopia. Moreana 73 (1982): 69–74. [Geritz R435; Wentworth 420.]

Geography in Utopia

Arcadia, Enclosed Gardens, Cities, Order and Nature

  1. Boewe, Charles. Human Nature in More's Utopia. The Personalist 41 (1960): 303–09. [Geritz R049; Wentworth 578.]
  2. Berger, Harry, Jr. The Renaissance Imagination: Second World and Green World. Centennial Review 9 (1965): 36–78. Rpt. in Second World and Green World: Studies in Renaissance Fiction-Making. Intro. John Patrick Lynch. Berkeley: U of California P, 1988. 3–40. Pp. 63–74 rpt. as [Utopia: Game, Chart, or Prayer?] Sir Thomas More: Utopia. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1975. 203–12. [Geritz R036; Wentworth 576; Sullivan S2:13.]
  3. Mumford, Lewis. Utopia, the City, and the Machine. Daedalus 94 (1965): 271–92. Rpt. in Utopias and Utopian Thought. Ed. Frank E. Manuel. Boston: Beacon P, 1965. 3–24. [Geritz R298.]
  4. Levin, Harry. [Utopia.] The Myth of The Golden Age in the Renaissance. Bloomington: Indiana UP; London: Faber & Faber, 1969. 89–93. [Geritz J016.]
  5. Meulon, Henri. More homme d'action: le défenseur de la cité. Moreana 21 (1969): 89–97. [Geritz F206.]
  6. Gury, Jacques. The Abolition of the Rural World in Utopia. Moreana 43/44 (1974): 67–69 + 46 (1975): 95–96. [Geritz R175.]
  7. Gury, Jacques. Sequentia Utopica: 2. Similitudo concordiam facit. Moreana 42 (1974): 101–102. [Geritz R173. On the uniformity of city life in Utopia.]
  8. Rebhorn, Wayne A. Thomas More's Enclosed Garden: Utopia and Renaissance Humanism. English Literary Renaissance 6 (1976): 140–55. [Geritz R332; Wentworth 558.]
  9. Sylvester, Richard S. Images of the City in Thomas More's Utopia. Les Cités au Temps de la Renaissance. Ed. Marie-Thérèse Jones-Davies. Centre de Recherches Sur La Renaissance 2. Université de Paris-Sorbonne: Institut de Recherches Sur Les Civilisations de l'Occident Moderne. Angers: Moreana, 1977. 191–205. [Geritz R411; Wentworth 644.]
  10. Wooden, Warren W. Utopia and Arcadia: An Approach to More's Utopia. College Literature 6 (1979): 30–40. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 78 (1983): 29; Geritz R446; Wentworth 518.]
  11. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. Time in More's Utopia. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Turonensis: Proceedings of the Third International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies, Tours 6–10 September 1976. Ed. Jean-Claude Margolin. De Pétrarque à Descartes, 38. 2 vols. Paris: J. Vrin, 1980. 697–707. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 3–15. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 69 (1981): 106; Geritz R274; Wentworth 554.]
  12. Gundersheimer, Werner L. Patronage in the Renaissance: An Exploratory Approach. Patronage in the Renaissance. Ed. Guy Fitch Lytle and Stephen Orgel. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1981. 3–23, esp. 6–8. [Geritz R170. Briefly discusses enclosed gardens in Utopia.]
  13. Donnelly, Dorothy F. Temporal and Cosmic Order: The Making of a New Vision in Thomas More's Utopia. Proceedings of the PMR Conference 9 (1984): 103–16. Rev. vers. rpt. as Reshaping Utopia: Thomas More's Utopia. in Patterns of Order and Utopia. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1998. 61–77, 118–125. [Geritz R099; Wentworth 545.]
  14. D'Amico, Jack. The Garden of King Utopus: Leisure in Utopia. Midwest Quarterly [Pittsburg, KS] 26 (1985): 499–509. [Geritz R079; Wentworth 543. On leisure, gardens, games and sports in More's Utopia and Elyot's Governor.]
  15. McLean, Andrew M. Thomas More's Utopia as Dialogue and City Encomium. [1985] See Dialogue, Dialectic and Drama.
  16. Chené, Adèle. La proximité et la distance dans l'Utopie de Thomas More. [1986] See Geography and Maps.
  17. Freeman, John. A Model Territory: Enclosure in More's Utopia. The Territorial Rights of Nations and Peoples. Ed. John R. Jacobson. New York: Edwin Mellen Press, 1989. 241–67. [Geritz R144.]
  18. Dooley, Patrick K. More's Utopia: An Ecosystem at Climax Stage. Moreana 101/102 (1990): 37–46. [Sum.: pp. 45–46; Geritz R104; Wentworth 437.]
  19. McClung, William A. Projectar Utopia. Trans. Didia Marques Reckert. A Simbólica do Espaço: Cidades, Ilhas, Jardins. Ed, Yvette Kace Centeno, and Lima de Freitas. Lisbon: Editorial Estamopa, 1991. 87–105. [Geritz R264.]
  20. Freeman, John. More's Island of Improvement: A Field Theory Approach to Utopia. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 61–84. [Sum.: pp.290–91; Geritz R145. For Freeman the description of Utopian agriculture reflects the agrarian revolution in Europe caused by the demise of the feudal system and the rise of the enclosure movement denounced in Book I. Utopian agriculture is an alternative to "enclosures" that reinstates the "open field" system of the English commons, thus paradoxically making Utopia one vast enclosure.]
  21. McClung, William A. Designing Utopia. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 9–28. [Sum.: p. 287; Geritz R263. On the problem of mapping Utopia and visualising Utopian architecture.]
  22. Manley, Lawrence. The City and Humanism. Literature and culture in early modern London. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1995. 23–62. [Geritz R244.]
  23. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. More's Utopia, Callenbach's Ecotopia, and Biosphere 2. More's Utopia and the Utopian Inheritance. Ed. A. D. Cousins, and Damian Grace. Lanham, MY: University Press of America, 1995. 69–88. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 149–170. [Geritz R269.]
  24. Jones, Sarah Rees. Thomas More's Utopia and Medieval London. Pragmatic Utopias: Ideals and Communities, 1200–1630. Ed. Rosemary Horrox, Sarah Rees Jones, and Richard Barrie Dobson. Cambridge: CUP, 2001. 117–135.
  25. Ribhegge, Wilhelm. Thomas More's Utopia: The Humanist View of City and Court in the Renaissance. Wolfenbütteler Renaissance Mitteilungen 29 (2005): 18–31
  26. Carpinelli, Francis. Pollutions Beyond the Walls — In More's London and in his Utopia. Moreana 51:197–198 (Dec. 2014): 83–113. [Sum.: pp.83–84.]
  27. Zuzanek, Jiri. Work and Leisure in Thomas More’s Utopia. Leisure Studies Online 06 May 2016: 1–10. (doi)

Maps and Location

  1. Plank, Robert. The Geography of Utopia: Psychological Factors Shaping the Ideal Location. Extrapolation 6:2 (1964): 39–49.
  2. Goodey, Brian R. Mapping Utopia: A Comment on the Geography of Sir Thomas More. The Geographical Review 60 (1970): 15–30. [Geritz R158; Wentworth 552.]
  3. Nagel, Alan F. Lies and the Limitable Inane: Contradiction in More's Utopia. [1973] See Irony, Paradox, Humour and Satire.
  4. Gury, Jacques. Sequentia Utopica: 1. About the Maps of Utopia. Moreana 42 (1974): 99–101. [Geritz R173. On the relationship between the Maps in the 1516 and 1518 editions of Utopia.]
  5. Bony, Alain. Fabula, Tabula: L'Utopie de More et l'image du monde. Études Anglaises 30 (1977): 1–19. [Geritz R051; Sullivan S2:19.]
  6. Kruyfhooft, Cécile. A Recent Discovery: Utopia by Abraham Ortelius. The Map Collector, no. 16 (Sept. 1981): 10–14.
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, M for Map: Maps of Utopia, Moreana 73 (1982): 103–105. [Geritz R248.]
  7. Rousseau, Marie-Claude. Ex non insula . . . insulam: l'île, fil d'Ariane de l'Utopie. Moreana 69 (1981): 129–36. [Geritz R344.]
  8. Chené, Adèle. La proximité et la distance dans l'Utopie de Thomas More. Renaissance and Reformation 22 (1986): 277–88. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 106/107 (1991): 202: Geritz R069.]
  9. Margolin, Jean-Claude. Sur L'insularité d'Utopia: Entre L'érudition et la rêverie. Miscellanea Moreana: Essays for Germain Marc'hadour. Moreana 100: Volume XXVI Mélanges Marc'hadour. Ed. Clare M. Murphy, Henri Gibaud and Mario A. Di Cesare. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 61. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1989. 303–21. [Sum.: Moreana 98/99 (1988): 160, 255; Geritz R253.]
  10. Baker-Smith, Dominic. The Location of Utopia: Narrative Devices in a Renaissance Fiction. [1991] See Rhetoric, Fiction and Poetics.
  11. Freeman, John. More's Place in No Place: The Self-Fashioning Transaction in Utopia. [1992] See Utopia and Literary Theory.
  12. McClung, William A. Designing Utopia. [1994] See Arcadia, Enclosed Gardens, Cities, Order and Nature.
  13. Shephard, Robert. Utopia, Utopia's Neighbours, Utopia, and Europe. Sixteenth Century Journal 26 (1995): 843–56. [Sum.: p.843; Geritz R371.]
  14. Quarta, Cosimo. L'Utopia come generatrice di nuovi mondi [Utopia and its Capacity to Generate New Worlds]. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 121–40. [Sum.: pp. 294–96; Geritz R329.]
  15. Bishop, Malcolm. Ambrosius Holbein's Memento mori map for Sir Thomas More's Utopia. The meanings of a masterpiece of early sixteenth century graphic art. British Dental Journal 199:2 (2005): 107–112.
  16. Davis, J. C. Going Nowhere: Traveling to, through, and from Utopia. Utopian Studies 19:1 (2008): 1–25.
  17. [Ortelius' Map of Utopia.] Cartographica Neerlandica Background for Ortelius Map No. 234. http://www.orteliusmaps.com/book/ort234.html [Accessed 7 Dec. 2016].

Geographical Sources

  1. Jevons, H. Stanley. Contemporary Models of Sir Thomas More: Utopia and the Socialist Inca Empire. TLS 2 Nov. 1935: 692. [Geritz R205; Sullivan 2:166. On parallels between Utopia and Peru.]
  2. Parks, George B. More's Utopia and Geography. Journal of English and Germanic Philology 37 (1938): 224–36. [Geritz R316; Wentworth 557.]
  3. Morgan, Arthur E. Nowhere Was Somewhere: How History makes Utopias and how Utopias make History. Chapel Hill, NC: U of North Carolina P, 1946. Pp. 34–38 rpt as [Is Utopia an Account of the Inca Empire?] Sir Thomas More: Utopia. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1975. 230–33. [Geritz R291; Wentworth 411; Sullivan 2:339.]
  4. McCann, Franklin T. America in Imaginative English Fiction before 1550. English Discovery of America to 1585. New York: Crown P; London: Oxford UP, 1952. Rpt. New York: Octagon Books, 1969. 69–97, 187–88, 218–19. [Sullivan 2:306–307. On Barclay's The Ship of Fools, More's Utopia and John Rastell's Interlude of the Four Elements.]
  5. Randles, W. G. L. The Sources of Sir Thomas More's Utopia. Revista da Faculdade de Letras [Lisbon] Ser.2, 21 (1955): 5–18. [See Matos Expansion, p.386n8 & 396n37. On Utopia and Camões' Lusiades.]
  6. Liljegren, Sten Bodvar. Studies on the Origin and Early Tradition of Utopian Fiction. Uppsala Institute, Essays and Studies on English Language and Literature 23. Uppsala: A.-B. Lundequistska Bokhandeln; Copenhagen: Ejnar Munksgaard, 1961. [Geritz R232; Wentworth 611. On the relationship of More's Utopia to the contemporary European voyages of discovery.]
    Review(s):
    1. (Review Article) Mahmoud A. Manzaloui, Reflexions on Professor S. B. Liljegren's Studies on . . . Utopian Fiction, Moreana 2 (1964): 37–50.
  7. Bernstein, Michel. Nouvelles lumieères sur l'Utopie. Bibliothèque d'Humanisme et Renaissance 24 (1962): 479–82. [Sullivan S2:13–14. On a Russian study by M. P. Alexeev on the Slavic sources of Utopia.]
  8. Derrett, J. Duncan M. Thomas More and Joseph the Indian. Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland April, 1962: 18–34. [Geritz R091; Wentworth 404.]
  9. Manzalaoui, Mahmoud A. More's Reference to the Syrians in Utopia, Book I, Notes and Queries ns 10 (1963): 290–92. [Geritz R246; Sullivan 2:280.]
  10. Derrett, J. Duncan M. Gemistus Plethon, the Essenes, and More's Utopia. Bibliothèque d'Humanisme et Renaissance 27 (1965): 597–606. [Geritz R089; Wentworth 403.]
  11. Derrett, J. Duncan M. More's Utopia and Indians in Europe. Moreana 5 (1965): 17–18. [Geritz R090.]
  12. Matos, Luís de. A Utopia de Tomás More e a expansão portuguesa. Instituto Superior de Ciências Sociais e Politica Ultramarina, Estudios Politicos e Sociais [Lisbon] 4:3 (1966): 809–820. [Sum.: José V. de Pina Martins,Moreana 69 (1981): 150, n.6. A comparison of Duarte Barbosa and Raphael Hythloday.]
  13. Sieber, Marc. Realität oder Utopie? Gedanken zur Zielsetzung der Kolonisation. [Reality or Utopia? Thoughts on the Objective [Goal] of Colonization.] Discordia Concors: Festgabe für Edgar Bonjour zu seinem siebzigsten Geburtstag an 21. August 1968. 2 vols. Basel and Stuttgart: Helbing & Lichtenhahn, 1968. 1: 107–20. [On the Portuguese and Spanish voyages of discovery and conquest as background to Utopia.]
  14. Minattur, Joseph. More's Utopia and Kerala. Moreana 22 (1969): 39–43. Rpt. from Keralam Vol. 1:1. [Geritz R287; Wentworth 410.]
  15. Seeber, Hans Ulrich. Hythloday as Preacher and a Possible Debt to Macrobius. [1971] See Raphael Hythloday as Narrator.
  16. Moser, Fernando de Mello. Tomás Moro e o seu heterónimo português. O Boletim de Sociedade de Geografia de Lisboa 97a 1–3, 4–6 (1979): 71–88. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 69 (1981): 64. On Utopia and the Portuguese Voyages of Expansion (c.1515), See also Moreana 69: 137–38.]
  17. Murphy, Clare M. Ottoman Analogs to Utopia. Moreana 69 (1981): 65–75 + 73 (1982): 79. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana69pages65-76.pdf [Geritz R299; Wentworth 412.]
  18. Wands, J. W. Antipodal Imperfection: Hall's Mundus Alter et Idem and its Debt to More's Utopia. [1981] See More, Hall and Swift.
  19. Murphy, Clare M. The Turkish Threat and Thomas More's Utopia. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Bononiensis: Proceedings of the Fourth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies: Bologna, 26 August to 1 September 1979. Ed. Richard J. Schoeck. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 37. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1985. 158–71. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/bononactaconvent00inteuoft [Sum.: Seymour B. House, Moreana 95/96 (1987): 107–108; Geritz R300; Wentworth 413.]
  20. Arciniegas, Germán. Utopia: Protest and Illusion. America in Europe: A History of the New World in Reverse. Trans. from the Spanish by Gabriela Arciniegas and R. Victoria Arana. San Diego: Harcourt Bruce Jovanovich, 1986. 49–71, 269–73. Translated from the Original Spanish Edition: America en Europa. Buenos Aires: Editorial Sudamericana, 1975. [A rather fanciful and scattered essay on the influence of Vespucci's account on More, and on America as Utopia.]
  21. Strosetzki, Christoph. L'Utopie de Thomas More: Une réponse au débat sur le Nouveau Monde. Moreana 101/102 (1990): 5–24. [Sum.: pp.23–24; Geritz R391.]
  22. Cave, Alfred A. Thomas More and the New World. Albion 23 (1991): 209–29. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 407–427. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 264.]
  23. Matos, Luís de. L'Vtopia de Thomas More et l'Expansion Portugaise. L'Expansion Portugaise dans la littérature latine de la Renaissance. Portuguese Foreword by José V. de Pina Martins. Lisbon: Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Seviço de Educaçáo, 1991. 383–422. [A fundamental study. Contains chapters on Vespucci, Utopia, Damião de Góis, etc. In his chapter on More, Matos places special emphasis on the Itinerarium Portugallensium (1508) as a source for Utopia. See also Matos's Facsimile edition of the Itinerarium, which discusses More in the Introduction.]
  24. Helmstaedter, Gerhard. Neue Welt und Neue Insel: Vespucci, Hythlodäus und die Insel Utopia. [New World and New Island: Vespucci, Hythloday and the Island of Utopia] Thomas Morus Jahrbuch 1992. 55–61.
  25. Marc'hadour, Germain. Thomas More and the New World. Thomas Morus Jahrbuch 1992. 85–93. [Sum.: Paul Akio Sawada, Moreana 117 (1994): 135–36.]
  26. Matos, Luís de. Introdução. Itinerarium Portugallensium. Reprodução fac-similada da edição princeps (Milão, 1508). Lisbon: Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Seviço de Educaçáo, 1992. xi–lxxvii. [Includes extensive discussion of the Itinerarium as a source for More's Utopia (xlix–lxxvi).]
  27. Fausett, David. Chapter 3. Early Austral Fiction. Writing the New World: Imaginary Voyages and Utopias of the Great Southern Land. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse UP, 1993. 28–43, esp. 37–43, 187–90.
    Review(s):
    1. James Burns, Early Modern Literary Studies 2.2 (Aug. 1996): 11.1–7. http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/02-2/rev_bur1.html
  28. Stobbart, Lorraine. Utopia: Fact or Fiction? The Evidence from the Americas. Stroud, Gloucestershire: Alan Sutton, 1992. [Geritz R390. Claims that More's Utopia is based on Mayan Yucatan (discovered 1517).]
    Review(s):
    1. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 233–36.
  29. Rennie, Neil. Chapter 1. The Distant Past. Far-Fetched Facts: The Literature of Travel and the Idea of the South Seas. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995. 1–29, 223–232.
    Review(s):
    1. Michel J. Tolley, Utopian Studies 8:1 (1997): 220–22.
  30. Maroto Camino, Mercedes. Mapping Terra Incognita: The Reification of America in the works of Hernán Cortés, Amerigo Vespucci and Thomas More. Traveller's Tales, Real and Imaginary, in the Hispanic World and its Literature. Ed. Alun Kenwood. Melbourne: Voz Hispánica, 1993. 7–22. [Geritz R357.]
  31. Marc'hadour, Germain. Raphaël Hythlodée: le portugais découvreur de l'Utopie. [1998] See Raphael Hythloday as Narrator.
  32. Lakowski, Romuald I. Geography and the More Circle: John Rastell, Thomas More and the New World. Renaissance Forum 4.1 (1999):3.1–22. http://www.hull.ac.uk/renforum/v4no1/lakowski.htm
  33. Lakowski, Romuald I. Utopia and the Pacific Rim: The Cartographical Evidence. Early Modern Literary Studies 5.2 (September, 1999):5.1–19. http://purl.oclc.org/emls/05-2/lakocart.htm [Sum.: http://purl.oclc.org/emls/05-2/abstracts.htm]
  34. Houston, Chloé. Traveling Nowhere: Global Utopias in the Early Modern Period. A Companion to The Global Renaissance: English Literature and Culture in the Era of Expansion. Ed. by Jyotsna G. Singh. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009. 82–98.
  35. Wood, Sam. Courtly Pride and Christian Virtue: Thomas More's Utopia as a Guide to Speaking to Erasmus's Half-Christian Turk. Tudor Court Culture. Eds. Thomas Betteridge and Anna Riehl. Selinsgrove: Susquehanna UP, 2010. 25–41, 167–70.
  36. Vielle, M. Christophe. D'Anvers à Calicut: Pieter Gillis, Utopia, Sanskrit et Malayāam. Prepublication. Societas Belgica Indiae Orientalis, Bruxelles; Institut orientaliste de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, 2009. Available Online at http://belgianindology.blogs.lalibre.be/list/s-b-i-o-library/1050387222.pdf [Deals with possible Indian sources of the Utopian alphabet.] Revised version published as La langue de l'île d'Utopie : les Indes orientales vues des Flandres à la Renaissance. Acta Orientalia Belgica 26 (2013): 203–22.
  37. Lakowski, Romuald Ian. Science and Utopia: Thomas More's Knowledge of Renaissance Science. Moreana 53:203–204 (2016): 119–145. [Sum.: pp.119–120.]

See also Utopia, Spain, New Spain and America

Humanism, Ethics, Philosophy and Religion

Epicurus, Pleasure and Moral Philosophy

  1. Surtz, Edward. Epicurus in Utopia. English Literary History 16 (1949): 89–103. Rpt. as Fortunes of Epicurus in Utopia. The Praise of Pleasure: Philosophy, Education and Communism in More's Utopia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1957. 23–35, 205–209. [Geritz R396; Wentworth 563.]
  2. Surtz, Edward. The Defense of Pleasure in More's Utopia. Studies in Philology 46 (1949): 99–112. Rpt. as The Defense of Pleasure. The Praise of Pleasure: Philosophy, Education and Communism in More's Utopia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1957. 17–22, 203–205. [Geritz R395; Wentworth 562.]
  3. Surtz, Edward. The Link Between Pleasure and Communism in Utopia. [1955] See Utopian Communism, Law, Property and Prosperity.
  4. Marc'hadour, Germain. Utopian Epicureanism. Moreana 11 (1966): 69–71. [G.M. compares different translations of CW 4: 144/20–21.]
  5. Jones, Judith P. The Philebus and the Philosophy of Pleasure in Thomas More's Utopia. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 61–69. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages61-70.pdf [Geritz R209; Wentworth 408.]
  6. Lacombe, M.-M. La sagesse d'Épicure dans l'Utopie de More. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 169–82. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages169-182.pdf [Geritz R225.]
  7. Le Doeuff, Michèle. La rêverie dans Utopia. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale [Paris] 78 (1973): 480–86. [Sum.: James Perrin Warren, Moreana 58 (1978): 82–83; Geritz R230.]
  8. Morgan, Alice B. Philosophic Reality and Human Construction in the Utopia. Moreana 39 (1973): 15–23. [Geritz R290; Wentworth 556.]
  9. Evans, John X. The Kingdom Within More's Utopia. [1977] See Religion and Theology.
  10. Simon, Elliott. P. Thomas More's Utopia: Creating an Image of the Soul. Moreana 69 (1981): 21–40. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana69pages21-40.pdf [Geritz R373; Wentworth 633.]
  11. White, Thomas I. Pride and the Public Good: Thomas More's Use of Plato in Utopia. [1982] See Utopia and Plato.
  12. Kenyon, Timothy A. The Problem of Freedom and Moral Behavior in Thomas More's Utopia. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (1983): 349–73. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 195-219. [Geritz R215; Wentworth 608.]
  13. Galibois, Roland. L'Utopie: éloge du plaisir? Moreana 98/99 (1988): 171–88. [Sum.: p.188; Geritz R149.]
  14. White, Thomas I. The Key to Nowhere: Pride and Utopia. Interpreting Thomas More's Utopia. Ed. John C. Olin. New York: Fordham UP, 1989. 37–60. [Geritz R431; Wentworth 648. Essentially a reworking of White's earlier paper Pride and the Public Good.]
    Review(s):
    1. Clare M. Murphy, Sixteenth Century Journal 22 (1991): 883.
    2. Albert Rabil, Jr., Church History 61 (1992): 406.
    3. Dorothy F. Donnelly, Moreana 100 (1992): 57–59.
    4. George M. Logan, Moreana 31: 118/119 (1994): 206–08.
  15. Baumann, Uwe. Die Utopia des Thomas Morus: Entwurf für eine politische Ethik? Thomas Morus Jahrbuch 1994. 100–114.
  16. Moulakis, Athanasios. Pride and the Meaning of Utopia. History of Political Thought 11 (1990): 241–56. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 263.]
  17. Grace, Damian. Knowledge and Politics in More's Utopia. QWERTY [Pau, France] 8 (1998): 47–54. [On the relationship between the Utopians' Epicurean theories and their political practice. Cicero's De finibus was the main source for More's knowledge of Epicureanism.]
  18. Greenblatt, Stephen. Utopian Pleasure. Cultural Reformations: Medieval and Renaissance in Literary History. Ed. Brian Cummings and James Simpson. Oxford Twenty-First Century Approaches to Literature. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2010. 305–320.
  19. Phélippeau;, Marie-Claire. Thomas More et l'ouverture humaniste. [2014] See More and Humanism.
  20. Vilar, Mariano, A. Pleasure and Variety in Thomas More’s Utopia. Moreana 53:203–204 (2016): 147–70. [Sum.: pp.147–48.]

War and Peace in Utopia

  1. Oncken, Hermann. Die Utopia des Thomas Morus und das Machtproblem in der Staatslehre. [1922] See Social and Political Philosophy.
  2. Belgion, Montgomery. Disarmament in the Sixteenth Century. Dublin Review 194 (1934): 1–15. [On Erasmus' Querela pacis and More's Utopia.]
  3. Brie, Friedrich. Machtpolitik und Krieg in der Utopia des Thomas Morus. Historiches Jahrbuch des Görresgesellschaft 61 (1941): 116–37.
  4. Reilly, Joseph John. War and More's Utopia, Catholic World 154 (1941): 151–59. Rpt. in Of Books and Men. New York: Messner, 1942. 261–73. [Geritz R333; Wentworth 559.]
  5. Falls, Mary Robert. The Problem of War in the Utopia of St. Thomas More. M.A. Diss., Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., 1944. [Sullivan 1:340.]
  6. Caspari, Fritz. Sir Thomas More and Justum Bellum. Ethics 56 (1945/46): 303–08. [Geritz R066; Wentworth 542; Sullivan 1:173–74. A critique of Oncken's views on Utopian warfare. See also S. Avineri's article.]
  7. Ferguson, Arthur B. The Indian Summer of Chivalry: Studies on the Decline and Transformation of Chivalric Idealism. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1960. 168–72, 216–18. [Geritz G026.]
  8. Avineri, Shlomo. War and Slavery in More's Utopia. International Review of Social History 7 (1962): 260–90. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 89–119. [Geritz R018; Wentworth 537. On twentieth-century views of Utopian warfare: mainly German (Oncken) and neo-Catholic dialogic) interpretations.]
  9. Holquist, Michael. How to Play Utopia: Some Brief Notes on the Distinctiveness of Utopian Fiction. Yale French Studies 41 (1968): 106–23. Rpt. in Game, Play, Literature. Ed. Jacques Ehrmann. Boston: Beacon, 1971. 106–23. [Geritz R197; Wentworth 604. The relationship of chess to battle is like that between utopia and actual society. ]
  10. Di Scipio, Guiseppe C. De re militari in Machiavelli's Prince and More's Utopia. Moreana 77 (1983): 11–22. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana77pages11-22.pdf [Geritz R097; Wentworth 544.]
  11. Dust, Philip. Alberico Gentili's Commentaries on Utopian War. Moreana 37 (1973): 31–40. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana37pages31-40.pdf Rpt. in Three Renaissance Pacifists: Essays in the Theories of Erasmus, More and Vives. American University Studies 23, Series IX History. New York: Peter Lang, 1987. 105–121. Rpt. in Europa: Wiege des Humanismus und der Reformation. 5 Internationales Symposion der Amici Thomas Mori 20. bis 27. Mai 1995 in Mainz. Dokumentation. Ed. Hermann Boventer and Uwe Baumann. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1997. 305–313. [Geritz R119; Wentworth 546. On the comments on Utopian warfare in the De Iure Belli of the Protestant, Italo-Anglo jurist, Alberico Gentili (1552–1608).]
  12. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. War Games in Utopia. The Portrayal of Life Stages in English Literature, 1500–1800: Infancy, Youth, Marriage, Aging, Death, Martyrdom. Essays in Honor of Warren Wooden. Ed. J. Watson, and P. McM. Pittman. Studies in British History 10. Lewiston, NY: The Edwin Mellon P, 1989. 29–56. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 65–89. [Sum.: Albert J. Geritz, Moreana 109 (1992): 87–88. On warfare in Europe (Book I), and in the De re militari section of Book II.]
  13. Müllenbrock, Heinz-Joachim. Krieg in Morus' Utopia. Anglia: Zeitschrift für englische Philologie 120:1 (Oct. 2002): 1–29. (Online)

See also More: Pacifism

Utopia and the History of Political Thought

  1. Hexter, J. H. Introduction: Utopia and Its Historical Milieu. Utopia. Vol. 4 of The Yale Edition of the Complete Works of St. Thomas More. New Haven: Yale UP, 1965. xxiii–cxxiv. Rpt. as The Utopian Vision: Thomas More. Utopia and Its Historical Milieux. The Vision of Politics on the Eve of the Reformation: More, Machiavelli, and Seyssel. New York: Basic Books; London, Allen Lane, 1973. 19–107, 117–37.
  2. Hay, Denys. Sir Thomas More's Utopia: Literature or Politics. [1972] See Genre and Interpretation.
  3. Fenlon, Dermott B. England and Europe: Utopia and its Aftermath. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society 5th ser. 25 (1975): 115–35. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 351–371. [Geritz R132; Wentworth 594. Utopia as part polis, part family and part monastery.]
    Review(s):
    1. William G. Palmer, Southern Humanities Review 19 (1985): 349–51.
  4. Skinner, Quentin. Utopia and the Critique of Humanism. The Foundations of Modern Political Thought. 2 vols. Vol. 1. The Renaissance. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1978. I: 215–18, 246–47, 255–62. [Geritz R374; Wentworth 634.]
  5. Bradshaw, Brendan. More on Utopia. Historical Journal 24 (1981): 1–27. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 116–142. [Geritz R054; Wentworth 579.]
    Review(s):
    1. William G. Palmer, Southern Humanities Review 19 (1985): 351–54.
  6. Logan, George M. The Meaning of More's Utopia. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1983. Rpt. Princeton Reprint Library. Princeton: Princeton UP, 2014. [Geritz R235; Wentworth 612. A study of More's indebtedness to the tradition of classical and medieval political speculation: De optimu statu reipublicae.]
    Review(s):
    1. Elizabeth McCutcheon, Renaissance and Reformation 21:1 (1985): 73–77 (Online).
    2. Clarence H. Miller, Catholic Historical Review 72 (1986): 87–88.
    3. Anne Lake Prescott, Renaissance Quarterly 37 (1984): 444–47.
    4. André Prévost, Moreana 83/84 (1984): 145–50.
  7. Norbrook, David. The Utopia and Radical Humanism. Poetry and Politics in the English Renaissance. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1984. 18–31, 288–91. [Geritz R304; Wentworth 484. Reflects influence of J. G. A. Pocock and Quentin Skinner.]
  8. Levine, Joseph M. Method in the History of Ideas: More, Machiavelli and Quentin Skinner. Annals of Scholarship 3:4 (1986): 37–60. [Pp. 52–56, 59–60 is a response to Skinner's discussion of More in Foundations of Political Thought (1978), and in Skinner's review article of the Yale Utopia, see Reviews of Utopia Editions.]
  9. Skinner, Quentin. Sir Thomas More's Utopia and the Language of Renaissance Humanism. The Languages of Political Theory in Early-Modern Europe. Ed. Anthony Pagden. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1987. 123–57. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 328–362. Revised and updated version as Thomas More's Utopia and the Virtue of True Nobility. Visions of Politics. 3 vols. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2002. II: 213–44. (DOI) [Geritz R376; Wentworth 636. On otium, negotium, true nobility, and The Best State of a Commonwealth. A very tightly argued paper; retracts some of his earlier statements in Foundations of Modern Political Thought (1978), and in Past and Present, see Reviews of Utopia Editions. See also Brendan Bradshaw, More on Utopia above.]
    Review(s):
    1. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 208–15.
  10. Skinner, Quentin. Political Philosophy: Sir Thomas More, Utopia and its Context. The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Ed. Charles S. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner, Eckhard Kessler, and Jill Kraye. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1988. 448–52. [Essentially a summary of Sir Thomas More's Utopia and the Language of Renaissance Humanism.]
  11. Logan, George M. The Argument of Utopia. Interpreting Thomas More's Utopia. Ed. John C. Olin. New York: Fordham UP, 1989. 7–35. [Geritz R234; Wentworth 475. On honestas and utilitas, on the conflict between rhetoric and philosophy in Utopia, Book I, and on Utopia as a best commonwealth exercise and on Utopian moral philosophy.]
    Review(s):
    1. Clare M. Murphy, Sixteenth Century Journal 22 (1991): 883.
    2. Albert Rabil, Jr., Church History 61 (1992): 406.
    3. Dorothy F. Donnelly, Moreana 100 (1992): 55–57.
  12. Logan, George M. Introduction. Thomas More: Utopia. Ed. George M. Logan and Robert M. Adams. Cambridge Texts in the History of Political Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1989. xi–xxx; Rev. ed. 2002. xi–xxix. [Sum.: Clare M. Murphy, Sixteenth Century Journal 22 (1991): 884–85. Incorporates material from The Argument of Utopia.]
  13. Tuck, Richard. Humanism and Political Thought. The Impact of Humanism on Western Europe. Ed. by Anthony Goodman and Angus MacKay. London: Longman, 1990. 43–65, esp. 61–63.
  14. Bradshaw, Brendan. Transalpine Humanism. The Cambridge History of Political Thought, 1450–1700. Ed. J. H. Burns, with the Assistance of Mark Goldie. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1991. 95–131, 685, esp. 110–125.
  15. Hankins, James. Humanism and the origins of modern political thought. The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Humanism. Edited by Jill Kraye. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1996. 118–141. (DOI) [Includes discussion of Machiavelli (134–37), and More (137–40).]
  16. Voegelin, Eric (d. 1985). The Order of Reason: Erasmus and More. History of Political Ideas. Volume IV: Renaissance and Reformation. The Collected Works of Eric Voegelin. Volume 22. Ed. with an Intro. by David L. Morse and William M. Thompson. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 1998. 88–130.
  17. Curtis, Cathy. The Best State of the Commonwealth: Thomas More and Quentin Skinner. Rethinking the Foundations of Modern Political Thought. Ed. Annabel Brett, and James Tully, with Holly Hamilton-Bleakley. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2006. 93–112.

Utopia and Renaissance Humanism

  1. Mesnard, Pierre. Thomas Morus ou l'Utopie d'un Humaniste. L'Essor de la Philosophie politique au XVIe siècle. Paris: Boivin & cie. 1936. 141–77. Rpt. in Bibliothèque d'histoire de la philosophie. Paris: J. Vrin, 1951, 1969. 141–77 + Supplément bibliographique 7–9. [Geritz J019; Sullivan 2:319.]
  2. Surtz, Edward. Logic in Utopia. Philological Quarterly 29 (1950): 389–401. Rpt. in The Praise of Pleasure: Philosophy, Education and Communism in More's Utopia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1957. 87–101, 215–18. [Geritz R401; Wentworth 641.]
  3. Surtz, Edward. Thomas More and the Great Books. Philological Quarterly 32 (1953): 43–57. Rpt. in The Praise of Pleasure: Philosophy, Education and Communism in More's Utopia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1957. 135–150, 223–25. [Geritz R408; Wentworth 568.]
  4. Surtz, Edward. The Setting for More's Plea for Greek in Utopia. Philological Quarterly 35 (1956): 353–65. Rpt. as Intellectual Salvation. The Praise of Pleasure: Philosophy, Education and Communism in More's Utopia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1957. 119–134, 220–23. [Geritz R406; Wentworth 567.]
  5. Mason, Harold Andrew. More's Utopia: The Vindication of Christian Humanism. Humanism and Poetry in the Early Tudor Period. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1959. 104–40. [Geritz G060; Wentworth 285. On More's Utopia as an expression of the ideals of Christian Humanism. Criticizes Donner's and Chamber's interpretations.]
  6. Gueguen, John A. Why is There No University in Utopia? Moreana 77 (1983): 31–34. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana77pages31-34.pdf [Geritz R169. Gueguen cites More's Letter to Oxford (1518) to illustrate scholastic opposition in the universities to the new humanist learning (including Greek)—the only kind of learning favoured in Utopia.]
  7. Schoeck, Richard J. Utopia: A Humanistic Masterpiece Revisited. Thomas Morus Jahrbuch 1989. 139–51. [Geritz R364.]
  8. Clair, André. Un paradigme de l'humanisme: l'Utopie de Thomas More. Ethique et Humanisme. Paris: Le Cerf, 1989. 223–46.
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 114 (1993): 102–03.
  9. Pavkovic, Aleksandar. Prosperity and Intellectual Needs: The Credibility and Coherence of More's Utopia. [1993] See Utopian Communism, Law, Property and Prosperity.
  10. Lampe, Jean-Claude. Sagesse et Humanisme dans l'Utopie de Thomas More. Mémoires de l'Académie Nationale des Sciences, Arts, Belles-Lettres de Caen. 32 (1994): 3–44. [Sum.: Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 127/28 (1996): 109–111.]
  11. Caspari, Fritz. Humanism as Utopia's Central Principle. Thomas Morus Jahrbuch 1995. 46–52. Rpt. in Europa: Wiege des Humanismus und der Reformation. 5 Internationales Symposion der Amici Thomas Mori 20. bis 27. Mai 1995 in Mainz. Dokumentation. Ed. Hermann Boventer and Uwe Baumann. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1997. 175–81. [Geritz R065.]
  12. Morrish, Jennifer. A Note on the Neo-Latin Sources for the word Utopia. Humanistica lovaniensia 50 (2001): 119–30. [Argues that More derived Nusquama from the Neo-Latin translations of Plato by Ficino and Decembrius.]
  13. Nelson, Eric. Greek Nonsense in More's Utopia. Historical Journal 44:4 (2001): 889–917. Rpt. in The Greek Tradition in Republican Thought. Ideas in Context. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2004. 19–48. Rpt. in Utopia: A Revised Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Trans. Robert M. Adams. Edited with a Revised Translation by George Logan. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 3rd ed. 2011. 259–283. [Sum.: (2004) p.1. Locates Sir Thomas More's Utopia within the broader context of the 16th-century Greek revival in England.]
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 147/48 (2001): 70–72.
  14. Logan, George M. Humanist More, and Questions and Discussion. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006): 1–13 + 14–23. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/LoganHumanistMore.pdf and http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/LoganQandD.pdf Audio recording available at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/conference2005.html. [Deals with both Utopia and Richard III. The discussion afterwards deals mainly with Richard III.]
  15. Nelson Eric. Utopia Through Italian Eyes: Thomas More and the Critics of Civic Humanism. Renaissance Quarterly 59:4 (2006): 1029–1057. [Sum.: p.1029.]

See also Utopia and Plato, and Aristotle, Cicero, and Augustine, etc.

Social and Political Philosophy

  1. Cruse, Hans. Die Utopia des Thomas Morus und die Soziale Frage. Berlin: L. Menzel, 1904. 44pp. [Sullivan 1:233.]
  2. A Social Optimist. TLS 27 Jul. 1917: 349–50, 369, 381–82, 393, 405. [Leading article + several letters.]
  3. Oncken, Hermann. Die Utopie des T. Morus und das Machtproblem in der Staatslehre. Sitzungsberichte der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften Philosophisch-historische Klasse 13 (1922). 2 Abhandlung. Vortrag. Heidelberg: Winter, 1922. [Oncken's famous (or notorious) attack on Utopia, made in the aftermath of WWI, which sees it as an expression of English proto-imperialism and lust for power politics. See also next item: Oncken's introduction to Gerhard Ritter's 1922 German translation of Utopia.]
  4. Oncken, Hermann. Einleitung. Ritter, Gerhard, trans. Thomas Morus: Utopia. Trans. Gerhard Ritter. Berlin: R. Hobbing, 1922. 5*–45*. Rpt. Stuttgart: Reclam-Verlag, 1964, 1983, 2003.
  5. Allen, John William. A History of Political Thought in the Sixteenth Century. London: Methuen. 1928. 153–56. Rpt. as A Sad and Witty Book. in Sir Thomas More: Utopia. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1975. 220–24. Rpt. 2nd rev. ed. 1992. 220–23. Rpt. in part as The Saddest of Fairy Tales. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 104–106. [Sullivan I:12; Geritz R008; Wentworth 570.]
    Review(s):
    1. Criterion 8 (1928/29): 563–64.
  6. Bendemann, Oswald. Studie zur Staats- und Sozialauffassung des Thomas Morus. Berlin-Charlottenburg: Gebr. Hoffmann, 1928. [A rebuttal of Oncken's interpretation of Utopia, see (Social and Political Philosophy).]
    Review(s):
    1. H. C. Matthes, Englische Studien 67 (1932): 266–70.
  7. Campbell, W. E. More's Utopia. Dublin Review 185 (1929): 194–216. [Wentworth 581; Sullivan 1:164. A Catholic interpretation: Utopia as dialogue. More's Catholic social philosophy. Utopia as an embodiment of the three 'evangelical counsels', and as an attempt to regulate the desires for pleasure, property and power.]
  8. Campbell, W. E. More's Utopia and His Social Teaching. London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1930. Rpt. New York: Russell & Russell, 1973. [Geritz R061; Wentworth 582; Sullivan 1:163–64. A Catholic interpretation.]
    Review(s):
    1. H. S. Bennett, Review of English Studies 7 (1931): 465–66.
    2. Pierre Janelle, History 17 (1930): 265–66.
  9. Freund, Michael. Zur Deutung der Utopia des Thomas Morus: Ein Beitrag zur Geschichte der Staatsräson in England. Historische Zeitschrift 142 (1930): 254–76.
  10. Delcourt, Marie. Le pouvoir du roi dans l'Utopie. Mélanges offerts à M. Abel Lefranc, professeur au Collège de France, membre de l'Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-lettres, par ses élèves et ses amis. Paris: E. Droz, 1936. 101–12. [Geritz R085.]
  11. Ritter, Gerhard. Machstaat und Utopie: Vom Streit um die D¨monie der Macht seit Machiavelli und Morus. Munich and Berlin: R. Oldenburg, 1940. Italian trans. as Il volto demoniaco del potere. Bologna: 1958. English trans. by F. W. Pick as The Corrupting Influence of Power. Hadleigh, Essex: Tower Bridge Publications, 6th ed. 1952. Pp. 70–89 of English trans. rpt. as Utopia and Power Politics. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 40–52. [Geritz G074; Wentworth 455. A disciple of Hermann Oncken. First written when the Nazis were in power. See also Ritter's 1922 German translation of Utopia in German Translations.]
  12. Adams, Robert P. The Philosophic Unity of More's Utopia. Studies in Philology 38 (1941): 45–65. [Geritz R005; Wentworth 569. On nature and reason in Utopia.]
  13. White, Helen C. The Utopia and Commonwealth Tradition. Social Criticism in Popular Religious Literature of the Sixteenth Century. New York: MacMillan, 1944. Rpt. New York: Octagon, 1973. 41–81, 292–95. [Geritz R427; Wentworth 462. More's social criticism in Utopia is in some ways, especially in its compassion for the poor, closer to Langland than Plato. On More's Christian humanism and his influence on Starkey's Dialogue, (1536) and John Hale's [William Stafford] A Discourse of the Common Weal of this Realm of England (1549).]
  14. Hamilton, Robert. More's Utopia: Its Bearing on Present Conditions. Hibbert Journal 44 (1945): 242–47. [Geritz R179; Sullivan 2:81–82. Utopia and modern totalitarianism, and the need for decentralization.]
  15. Campbell, Mildred. Introduction. The Utopia of Sir Thomas More. Toronto and New York: D. Van Nostrand, 1947. vii–xli. [On the historical background to the Utopia.]
  16. Grace, William J. The Conception of Society in More's Utopia. Thought 22 (1947): 283–96. [Geritz R162; Wentworth 597.]
  17. Campbell, W. E. The Utopia of Sir Thomas More. The King's Good Servant: Papers read to the Thomas More Society of London. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1948. 26–39. [Geritz R062; Wentworth 583; Sullivan 1:165–66. Deals with the questions of whether More was a dreamer in writing Utopia, of whether he was a Communist or was inconsistent and on religious toleration.]
  18. Ames, Russell. Citizen More and his Utopia. Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1949. Rpt. New York: Russell & Russell, 1969. Introduction rpt. in More's Utopia And its Critics. Ed. Ligeia Gallagher. Chicago: Scott, Foresman and Company, 1964. 135–47. Intro, Rpt. in part as The Bourgeois Point of View. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 53–57. Pp. 3–21 rpt. as More the Social Critic. in Utopia: A Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1975. 160–170. rpt. 2nd ed. 1992. ***–***; 3rd ed. 2011. 179–190. [Sullivan I:15–16; Geritz R016; Wentworth 571.]
  19. Campbell, W. E. More's Utopia. Erasmus, Tyndale and More. London: Eyre & Spottiswoode, 1949. 79–96. [cf. Sulllivan 1:161.]
  20. Mucchielli, Roger. L'Utopie de Thomas Morus. Les Utopies à la Renaissance. Travaux de l'Institut pour l'Étude de la Renaissance et de l'Humanisme 1. Brussels: Presses Universitaires de Bruxelles; Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1963. 99–106. [On Utopia and the Ideal City: the dialectic of utopia.]
  21. Parker, Thomas M. Sir Thomas More's Utopia. [1966] See Utopian Communism, Law, Property and Prosperity.
  22. Sawada, Paul Akio. Laus Potentiae or the Praise of Realpolitik? Hermann Oncken and More's Utopia. Moreana 15/16 (1967): 145–67. [Geritz R353; Wentworth 629.]
  23. Khanna, Lee Cullen. More's Utopia: A Literary Perspective on Social Reform. Diss. Columbia U, 1969. [Geritz R217.]
  24. Stevens, Richard G. The New Republic in More's Utopia. Political Science Quarterly 84 (1969): 387–411. [Geritz R387; Wentworth 560. Church and State, and toleration in Utopia: A modern liberal American interpretation.]
  25. Caudle, M. Sir Thomas More's Utopia: Origins and Purposes. Social Science 45 (1970): 163–69.
  26. Khanna, Lee Cullen. Utopia: The Case for Open-mindedness in the Commonwealth. [1971] See Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, and Reform.
  27. Hansot, Elizabeth. The Utopia of Thomas More. Perfection and Progress: Two Modes of Utopian Thought. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1974. 59–78. [Geritz R182; Wentworth 599. Utopia as a thought experiment.]
  28. Blockmans, W. P. Thomas More, Utopia, and the Aspirations of the Early Capitalist Bourgeoisie. Rotterdam: Erasmus Universiteit, 1978. [Sum.: A. E. de Schryrer, Moreana 70 (1981): 96.]
  29. Davis, J. C. The Re-Emergence of Utopia: Sir Thomas More. Utopia and the Ideal Society: A Study of English Utopian Writing, 1516–1700. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1981. 41–61. [Geritz R082 and R083; Wentworth 587. Reads Utopia as a straight-forward program. Misses all the complex ironies and playfulness of More's golden little book.]
    Review(s):
    1. Jacques Gury, Moreana 73 (1982): 59–61.
    2. C. Hill, London Review of Books 3:13 (16 July 1981): 9–10.
  30. Gury, Jacques. Libre citoyens d'Utopie. Moreana 69 (1981): 119–27. [Geritz R171.]
  31. Simon, Elliott P. Thomas More's Utopia: Creating an Image of the Soul. [1981] See Pleasure and Moral Philosophy.
  32. Elias, Norbert. Thomas Morus' Staatskritik: mit Überlegungen zur Bestimmung des Begriffs Utopie. [Thomas More's Critique of the State: With Reflections on the Definition of Utopia.] Utopieforschung: Interdisziplinäre Studien zur neuzeitlichen Utopie. [Utopia: Interdisciplinary Studies on modern Utopias] Ed. Wilhelm Voßkamp. 3 vols. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzler, 1982. 2: 101–50.
  33. Nendza, James. Political Idealism in More's Utopia. Review of Politics 46 (1984): 428–51. [Sum.: p.428. On Utopian manners, education, institutions, crafts, family life, and government. On the defects of Utopia, and on More's intention.]
  34. Nendza, James. Religion and Republicanism in More's Utopia. The Western Political Quarterly 37:2 (1984): 195–211.
  35. Sargent, Lyman Tower. More's Utopia: An Interpretation of its Social Theory. History of Political Thought 5 (1984): 195–210. [Geritz R352.]
  36. Tamura, Hideo. Yutopia e no Sekkin—shakaishisoteki apurochi. [Approaches to Utopia: An Essay in the History of Social Thought]. Tokyo: Chuo UP, 1985. [A collection of 13 articles in Japanese.]
    Review(s):
    1. Paul Akio Sawada, Moreana 98/99 (1988): 89–93.
  37. Kenyon, Timothy. Thomas More's Conception of the Human Condition. and The Utopia of Moral Conduct. [1989] See Utopian Communism, Law, Property and Prosperity.
  38. Baker, David. First Among Equals: The Utopian Princeps. Moreana 30: 115/116 (1993): 33–45. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana115-116pages33-45.pdf Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 458–470. [Sum.: p. 182–83; Geritz R019. Even Utopia has a prince, but unlike the European monarchs of the 16th century he is elected. However, his very existence is also a reminder that even Utopia is not free from the pursuit of preeminence.]
  39. Farnell, James E. The Governmental Structure of Utopia. Moreana 130 (1997): 11–26. [Sum.: p.11.] Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana130pages11-26.pdf
  40. Grace, Damian. Knowledge and Politics in More's Utopia. [1998] See Epicurus, Pleasure and Moral Philosophy.
  41. Wegemer, Gerard. Utopia: A Model Respublica of Peace, Libery and Self-Government. [2011] See Aristotle, Augustine, and Cicero.
  42. Hallberg, Peter. Thomas More's cosmopolitan civil science: The new world and utopia reconsidered. History of political thought 33:4 (2012): 578–606. [Sum.: http://philpapers.org/rec/HALTMC-4]
  43. Van Malssen, Tom. The State of Philosophy and Thomas More's Utopia. Interpretation: A Journal of Political Philosophy 40:1 (2013):25–55.
  44. Pei, Zhang. The Birth of Utopia. Canadian Review of Comparative Literature 41:3 (2014): 304–312.
  45. Benestad, J. Brian. Thomas More's Utopia and Catholic Social Doctrine. [2015] Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, Humanism and Reform.
  46. Stoner, James R., Jr. Images of the Statesman in Utopia. Thomas More: Why Patron of Statesmen? Edited by Travis Curtright. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2015. 37–53. [Sum.: p.2.]
  47. Wilde, Lawrence. Thomas More's Utopia: Arguing for Social Justice. London: Routledge, 2015, 2016 (pbk).

See also General Studies of Utopia, Utopia and Plato, Utopia: Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, and Reform, and More: Political Thought

Utopian Communism, Justice, Law, Property and Prosperity

  1. Carmichael, Montgomery. The Utopia: Its Doctrine of the Common Life. Dublin Review 191 (1932): 173–87. [Wentworth 539.]
  2. Surtz, Edward. Thomas More and Communism. [1949] See More: Political Thought
  3. Surtz, Edward L. The Link Between Pleasure and Communism in Utopia. Modern Language Notes 70 (1955): 90–93. Rev. vers. in The Praise of Pleasure. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1957. Ch.13. ***–***. [Geritz R400; Wentworth 564.]
  4. Foriers, Paul. Les Utopies et le droit. Les Utopies à la Renaissance. Travaux de l'Institut pour l'Étude de la Renaissance et de l'Humanisme 1. Brussels: Presses Universitaires de Bruxelles; Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1963. 233–61. Rpt. La pensée juridique de Paul Foriers. 2 vols. Brussels: Etablissemments E. Bruylant, 1982. Vol. I: ***–***. [Sum.: J. Jacques, Moreana 10 (1966): 51–52.]
  5. Parker, Thomas M. Sir Thomas More's Utopia. Essays in Modern English Church History in Memory of Norman Sykes. Ed. G. V. Bennett and J. D. Walsh. London: Adam & Charles Black, 1966. 1–17. [Geritz R315; Wentworth 624. On reason as the basis of law in Utopia and in More's trial.]
  6. Stevens, Richard G. On the Practicality of More's Utopia. [1966] See Utopia and Plato.
  7. Park, James W. The Utopian Economics of Sir Thomas More. American Journal of Economics and Sociology 30 (1971): 123–34. [Geritz R314; Wentworth 623.]
  8. McLean, Andrew. Utopian Communism and the State. Humanism and the Rise of Science in England. London: Heinemann, 1972. 56–63. [Follows Hexter.]
  9. McLean, Andrew M. A Note on Thomas More and Thomas Starkey. Moreana 41 (1974): 31–36. [Geritz R278; Wentworth 449.]
  10. Bärsch, C.E. Das Modell der kommunistischen Gesellschaft und seine Verwirklichung in der Utopie des Thomas Morus. [The model of communist society and its realization in the Utopia of Thomas More]. Ed. Hermann Boventer. 500 Jahre Thomas Morus: Humanist, Staatsmann, Märtyrer. Bensberg: Veröffentlichungen der Th. Morus Akademie, 1978. 13–37.
  11. Slavin, Arthur J. Tis far off, And rather like a dream: Common Weal, Common Woe and Commonwealth. Explorations in Renaissance Culture 14 (1988): 1–27. [Geritz R379; Wentworth 456. On property in More's Utopia and Morison's A Lamentation and The Remedy for Sedition.]
  12. Kenyon, Timothy. Thomas More's Conception of the Human Condition. and The Utopia of Moral Conduct. Utopian Communism and Political Thought in Early Modern England. London: Pinter Publishers, 1989. 39–117. [Geritz R216; Wentworth 609. Studies More's and Gerrard Winstanley's (b.1609) views on communism. Analyses More's views on communism in Utopia in relation to More's theology as expressed in his polemical works.]
    Review(s):
    1. J. C. Davis, History of Political Thought 11 (1990): 360–62.
    2. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 215–19.
  13. Doyon, Jacques. La loi dans l'Utopie de More. Moreana 103 (1990): 95–99. [Geritz R115.]
  14. Pavkovic, Aleksandar. Prosperity and Intellectual Needs: The Credibility and Coherence of More's Utopia. Utopian Studies 4:1 (1993): 26–37. Rpt. in part in More's Utopia and the Utopian Inheritance. Ed. A. D. Cousins, and Damian Grace. Lanham, MY: University Press of America, 1995. 23–35. [Geritz R318 and R319.]
    Review(s):
    1. Patricia Silvia Resines, Moreana 121 (1995): 83–85.
  15. Demenier, Hubert. La propriété en utopie: réflexions d'un juriste. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 85–101. [Sum.: pp. 291–93; Geritz R086. On the role of property in Utopia, Utopia as one big family.]
  16. Farnell, James E. Nusquama and Natural Law. Moreana 151/52 (2002): 85–114. [Sum.: pp.85–86.] Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana151-152pages85-114.pdf
  17. W. B. Gerard , W. B., and Eric Sterling. Sir Thomas More's Utopia and the transformation of England from absolute monarchy to egalitarian society. Contemporary Justice Review 8:1 (September 2005): 317–328. (doi)
  18. Bostaph, Samuel. Utopia from an Economist's Perspective. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006):196–98. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Bostaph.pdf
  19. Miller, Clarence H. No Lawyers in Utopia. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006):24–25. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/No_Lawyers_in_Utopia.pdf
  20. Osgood, Russell K. Law in Sir Thomas More's Utopia as Compared to His Lord Chancellorship. Thomas More Studies 1 (2006):177–87. http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/tmstudies/Osgood.pdf
  21. Stein, Joshua. Sir/St. Thomas More on the US Constitution: More Perfect is not Utopian. Contemporary Justice Review 9:3 (September 2006): 317–328. DOI)
  22. Cormack, Bradin. No More to Medle of the Matter: Thomas More, Equity, and the Claims of Jurisdiction. A Power to Do Justice: Jurisdiction, English Literature, and the Rise of Common Law, 1509–1625. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2007. 85–129, 350–57. [On Law in Utopia (102–129) and the Dialogue of Conscience (85–102) (Rogers 206).]
  23. Bostaph, Samuel. Deepening the Irony of Utopia: An Economic Perspective. History of Political Economy 42:2 (2010): 361–382. (DOI)
  24. Lorenzo, David J. Utopia. Cities at the End of the World: Using Utopian and Dystopian Stories to Reflect Critically on our Political Beliefs, Communities, and Ways of Life. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014. 15–44.

See also More, the Law and Literature

Religion and Theology

  1. Lecler, Joseph. Saint Thomas More (1478–1535): L'Utopie. Histoire de la tolérance au siècle de la Réforme. Paris: Aubier, Éditions Montaigne, 1955. 150–157. Translated from the French by T. L. Westow as Saint Thomas More (1478–1535): The Utopia. Toleration and the Reformation. Vol. 1. New York: Association Press; London: Longmans, 1960. 134–42. [Geritz R228; Wentworth 553. On toleration in Utopia and More's treatment of Heretics.]
  2. Miles, Leland. The Platonic Source of Utopia's Minimum Religion. [1956] See Utopia and Plato.
  3. Yates, Frances. Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1964. Rpt. in Frances Yates: Selected Works 2. London: Routledge, 1999. 185–187. [Sum.: J. B. Trapp, Erasmus, Colet, More, 124. On Pico della Mirandula as a source for Utopian religious hermeticism.]
  4. Gleason, John B. Sun Worship in More's Utopia. Le Soleil à la Renaissance: sciences et mythes. Travaux de l'Institut pour l'Étude de la Renaissance et de l'Humanisme 2. Brussels: Presses Universitaires de Bruxelles; Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1965. 433–45. [Geritz R157; J. Jacques, Moreana 8 (1965): 87. On the sources of sun-worship in the Church Fathers and the Pseudo-Platonic Epinomis, which was accepted as being Platonic by almost all Renaissance writers.]
  5. Beumer, Johannes. Läßt sich die Utopia des Thomas More ökumenisch deuten? Theologie und Philosophie 41 (1966): 75–83.
  6. Allen, Ward. Speculations on St. Thomas More's Use of Hesychius. [1967] See Names in Utopia and the Utopian Language.
  7. Halkin, Léon-E. Mithra dans l'Utopie. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 157–60. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages157-160.pdf [On Mithraism and the supreme god in Utopia.]
  8. Peters, Robert S. Utopia and More's Orthodoxy. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 147–55. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana31-32pages147-156.pdf [Geritz R323; Wentworth 625.]
  9. Sawada, Paul Akio. Toward the Definition of Utopia. [1971] See Genre and Interpretation.
  10. Adam, Michel. La spiritualité du travail dans l'Utopie de S. Thomas More. Revue d'Histoire de la Spiritualité 49 (1973): 421–42. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 43/44 (1974): 172–73.]
  11. Egan, Willis J. Thomas More: Other-Worldling and Prophet of Secularity. Moreana 51 (1976): 102–107. [Geritz R121.]
  12. Evans, John X. The Kingdom Within More's Utopia. Moreana 55/56 (1977): 5–21. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana51pages108-118.pdf [Geritz R130; Wentworth 593.]
  13. Gordon, Walter M. The Monastic Achievement and More's Utopian Dream. Medievalia et Humanistica ns 9 (1979): 199–214. [Geritz R160; Wentworth 521.]
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 75/76 (1982): 163–64.
  14. Marius, Richard. Utopia's Religion and Thomas More's Faith. [1984] See Genre and Interpretation.
  15. Marc'hadour, Germain, and Henri Gibaud. Election ou ordination: tentation utopienne et tentative coréene. Moreana 87/88 (1985): 167–71. [Geritz R252. On the question of whether priests for Utopia could be chosen without being ordained by a Christian bishop or Pope. See also articles by N. van der Blom in Prefatory Letters and Parerga.]
  16. Winkler, Gerhard B. Cönobium, Religion und Toleranz. Oder: Wie christlich sind Thomas Mores Utopier? A Yearbook of Studies in English Language and Literature 1985/86. Ed. Otto Rauchbauer. Festschrift für Siegfried Korninger.(Wiener Beiträge zur englischen Philologie 80.) Vienna: Braumüller, 1986. 277–86. [Geritz R439. On the monastic way of life as a basis for Utopia, and on religious tolerance in Utopia.]
    Review(s):
    1. E. H. L. Baumann, Moreana 98/99 (1988): 37–38.
  17. Kaufman, Peter Iver. Humanist Spirituality and Ecclesial Reaction: Thomas More's Monstra. Church History 56 (1987): 25–38. [Geritz R211; Wentworth 607.]
  18. Surtz, Edward. The Praise of Wisdom: A Commentary on the Religious and Moral Problems and Backgrounds of St. Thomas More's Utopia. [1987] See General Studies of Utopia.
  19. Marc'hadour, Germain. Utopia and Martyrdom. Interpreting Thomas More's Utopia. Ed. John C. Olin. New York: Fordham UP, 1989. 61–76. [Geritz R251; Wentworth 555. On the Buthrescae, and the spirituality of work. And on witness and martyrdom among Utopians and Christians.]
    Review(s):
    1. Clare M. Murphy, Sixteenth Century Journal 22 (1991): 884.
    2. Albert Rabil, Jr., Church History 61 (1992): 406.
    3. Dorothy F. Donnelly, Moreana 100 (1992): 59–60.
  20. Bedouelle, Guy-T. Utopie. Dictionaire de Spiritualité. Paris: Beauchesne, 1992. Vol. 16, cols. 101–113. [Sum.: István Bejczy and Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 110 (1992): 119.]
  21. Boventer, Hermann. Die gute Anfang und die böse Ender der Utopie [The Good Beginning and Bad Ending of Utopia]. Thomas Morus Jahrbuch 1992. 71–78. [Sum.: P. A. Sawada, Moreana 117 (1994): 136.]
  22. Marc'hadour, Germain. The Meaning of Pontifex in More's Utopia: Hythloday's Sentences and Diction. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Hafniensis. Proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies, Copenhagen, 12 August to 17 August 1991. Ed. R. Schnur, et al. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 120. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1994. 607–18. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/hafniactaconvent00inteuoft [Sum.: Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 130 (1997): 78; Geritz R249.]
  23. Martinez López, Miguel. The Life of the Essenes and the Life of the Utopians: A Case Study. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 43–59. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana118-119pages103-120.pdf [Sum.: pp.289–90. On the Essenes as a precedent for the community life of the Utopians.]
  24. Baker-Smith, Dominic. Utopia and the Franciscans. [1995] See More, St. Francis and the Franciscans.
  25. Martinez López, Miguel. The Idea of a Commonwealth According to the Essenes and St. Thomas More's The Best State of a Commonwealth and the new Island of Utopia. More's Utopia and the Utopian Inheritance. Ed. A. D. Cousins, and Damian Grace. Lanham, MY: University Press of America, 1995. 53–68.
  26. Warner, J. Christopher. Sir Thomas More, Utopia, and the Representation of Henry VIII, 1529–1533. Renaissance and Reformation 20:4 (1996): 59–72. Available Online [Sum.: p.59; G.M. Moreana 145 (2001): 46–47.]
  27. Gordon, Walter M. Thomas More's Utopia: Preface to Reformation. Renaissance and Reformation 21:3 (1997): 63–79. Available Online) [Sum.: p.63.]
  28. Baker, David Weil. Heresy and Utopia. Divulging Utopia: Radical Humanism in Sixteenth-Century England. Amherst, MA: U of Massachusetts P, 1999. 48–75, 189–196. [Contrasts More's treatment of religion in Utopia and the Responsio ad Lutherum. See also Baker's study of Robynson's translation in Studies of the Translations.]
    Review(s):
    1. Elizabeth McCutcheon, Moreana 149 (2002): 139–45, esp.142.
  29. Galibois, Roland. Religion et socialisme dans l'Utopie de Thomas More et dans les écrits du premier Tillich. Québec: Presses de l'Université Laval, et Paris, L'Harmattan, 2002. [Sum.: Guy Bedouelle, Moreana 160 (2004): 110–12.]
  30. Kessler, Sanford. Religious Freedom in Thomas More's Utopia. Review of Politics 64 (2002): 207–29. (DOI)
  31. DeCook, Travis. Utopian Communication. SEL Studies in English Literature 1500–1900 48.1 (2008) 1–22. (DOI)
  32. Webb, Darren. Christian Hope and the Politics of Utopia. Utopian Studies 19:1 (2008) 113–44.
  33. Gangale, Guiseppe. Utopia and Providence in the Humanism of Thomas More: Man is a god for man, if he knows his duty. Moreana 183/84 (2011): 193–203. [Sum.: pp. 193–94.]

Suicide and Death

  1. Belliard, Pierre. Thomas Moore et l'euthanasie. La Table Ronde 127/28 (Jul./Aug. 1958): 113–15. [Sum.: R. D. Jameson, AES 1 (1958): 1378.]
  2. Gatto, Louis C. Suicide and Utopian Philosophy. Ball State University Forum 9 (1968): 33–38. [Geritz R151; Wentworth 550.]
  3. Graziani, RenÉ. Non-Utopian Euthanasia: An Italian Report, c. 1554. Renaissance Quarterly 22 (1969): 329–33. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 26 (1970): 81; Geritz R163.]
  4. Derrett, J. Duncan M. St. Thomas More and the Would-be Suicide. [1970] See Early More Biographies: General Studies.
  5. Green, Paul D. Suicide, Martyrdom, and Thomas More. [1972] See Dialogue of Comfort.
  6. El-Gabalawy, Saad. The Ars Moriendi in More's Utopia. Mosaic 11:4 (1978): 115–26. [Geritz R122; Wentworth 548.]
  7. Maxcey, Carl E. Justice and Order: Martin Luther and Thomas More on the Death Penalty and Retribution. [1983] See Thomas More: Law and Politics
  8. Samaan, Angele B. Death and the Death-Penalty in More's Utopia and Some Utopian Novels. Moreana 90 (1986): 5–15. [Geritz R350.]
  9. Marc'hadour, Germain. Suicide et euthanasie chez More. Moreana 143/144 (2000): 139–46. [Deals with A Dialogue of Comfort as well as Utopia.]

Marriage, Divorce and Feminism

  1. Bataillon, Marcel. L'Ostension prenuptiale utopienne et l'antique habit des espagnes. Moreana 35 (1972): 57–58.
  2. Wilson, Katharina. Thomas More and Theophrastus—An Idea Put to Work. Moreana 67/68 (1980): 35–38. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana67-68pages35-38.pdf [Geritz R436. On Utopian pre-marital customs and a possible source in Theophrastus.]
  3. Woll, Mari Anne. Om Kvindens placering i Thomas Mores Utopia. [About Women's place in Thomas More's Utopia] Kvindestudier 5: Utopi og subkultur [Women's Studies 5: Utopia and subculture]. Ed. Nynne Koch. Copenhagem: Delta, 1981. 32–71. [Geritz R440. Danish article.]
  4. Doyle, Charles Clay. Baring Some Facts. Moreana 95/96 (1987): 17–19. [Geritz R110. On sources for the prenuptial naked showing of marriage partners.]
  5. Telle, Émile V. Marriage and Divorce on the Isle of Utopia—Utopian Reverberations with Erasmus of Rotterdam. Erasmus of Rotterdam Society Yearbook 8 (1988): 91–117. [Sum.: G. M. Moreana 101/02 (1990): 201–202.]
  6. Greenblatt, Stephen. Utopian Desire. Litteraria Pragensia 2.4 (1992): 30–41. [Geritz R165. Greenblatt uses Utopian marriage customs to claim that More was a sexual puritan.]
  7. Mueller, Janel. The Whole Island like a Single Family: Positioning Women in Utopian Patriarchy. Rethinking the Henrician Era: Essays on Early Tudor Texts and Contexts. Ed. Peter C. Herman. Urbana, IL: U of Illinois P, 1994. 93–122. [Sum.: p.8; Geritz R296.]
  8. Bruce, Susan. Virgins on the World and Feasts of the Family: Sex and the Social Order in Two Renaissance Utopias. [1997] See More, Bacon and Campanella
  9. Huebert, Ronald. Privacy: The Early Social History of a Word. Sewanee Review 105 (1997): 21–38, esp. 21–23, 26–27, 31. [Geritz R200.]

Classical and Medieval Sources and Analogues

General Studies

  1. Sherwin, Proctor Fenn. Some Sources of More's Utopia. Bulletin of the University of New Mexico, no. 88 [Language ser. 1:3] (Sept. 1917): 167–91. [Wentworth 416. On Plato's Republic, St. Augustine's De Civitate Dei and Erasmus's Institutio Principis Christiani (following Seebohm) as sources for Utopia.]
  2. Finley, M. I. Utopianism Ancient and Modern. The Critical Spirit: Essays Presented in Honour of Herbert Marcuse. Ed. Kurt H. Wolff, and Barrington Moore, Jr. Boston: Beacon P, 1967. 1–20.

Plutarch

  1. Schoeck, Richard J. More, Plutarch, and King Agis: Spartan History and the Meaning of Utopia. Philological Quarterly 35 (1956): 366–75. Rpt. in Essential Articles for the Study of Thomas More. Ed. Richard S. Sylvester and Germain Marc'hadour. Hamden, CT: Archon, 1977. 275–80, 625–27. [Geritz R360; Wentworth 414.]
  2. Africa, Thomas W. Thomas More and the Spartan Image. Historical Reflections 6 (1979): 343–52. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 69 (1980): 80.]
  3. Vickers, Brian. Utopia and Plutarch's Moralia. Notes and Queries ns 40 (1993): 152. [Geritz R418.]

Aristotle, Augustine, and Cicero

  1. Raitiere, Martin N. More's Utopia and The City of God. Studies in the Renaissance 20 (1973): 144–69. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 320–344. [Geritz R331; Wentworth 454.]
  2. White, Thomas, I. A Study of the Influence of Plato and Aristotle on Thomas More's Utopia. See Utopia and Plato [1974]
  3. Marc'hadour, Germain. Thomas More entre Aristote et Platon. Platon et Aristote à la Renaissance: XVIe colloque international de Tours. De Pétrarque à Descartes 32. Paris: J. Vrin, 1976. 483–91.
  4. White, Thomas I. Aristotle and Utopia. Renaissance Quarterly 29 (1976): 635–75. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 372–412. [Geritz R428; Wentworth 418.]
  5. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. More's Utopia and Cicero's Paradoxa Stoicorum. Moreana 86 (1985): 3–22. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana86pages3-22.pdf Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 261–280. [Geritz R268; Wentworth 479.]
  6. Wegemer, Gerard B. The Literary and Philosophic Design of Thomas More's Utopia. Diss. U of Notre Dame, 1986. [Geritz R423. DAI 47/3 (1986) 917A. On More's indebtedness to Plato, Cicero, and Augustine.]
  7. Wegemer, Gerard. Ciceronian Humanism in More's Utopia. Moreana 104 (1990): 5–26. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana104pages5-26.pdf Rev. vers. rpt. in Thomas More on Statesmanship. Washington, DC: Catholic U of America P, 1996. 109–127, 226–230. [Sum.: pp. 25–26; Geritz R421; Wentworth 461. Throughout Utopia More draws on Cicero: Morus defends Ciceronian Humanism while Hythloday represents the opposing view.]
  8. Wegemer, Gerard B. The City of God in Thomas More's Utopia. Renascence 44:2 (1992): 115–35. Rev. vers. rpt. in Thomas More on Statesmanship. Washington, DC: Catholic U of America P, 1996. 128–149, 230–232. [Geritz R422.]
  9. Bejczy, István. More's Utopia: The City of God on Earth? Saeculum: Jahrbuch für Universalgeschichte [Freiburg] 46 (1995): 17–30. Online at http://dare.ubn.kun.nl/bitstream/2066/28294/1/28294___.PDF [Geritz R033.]
  10. Piaia, Gregorio. Nauigauit quidem non ut Palinurus, sed ut Vlysses: Imo uelut Plato: Is More's Utopia an Ideal Constitution? Ideal Constitutions in the Renaissance: Papers for the Munich February 2006 Conference. Ed. Heinrich C. Kuhn, and Diana Stanciu. Renaissance Intellectual History, Band 1. Edited Heinrich C. Kuhn, Sachiko Kusukawa, Marianne Pade and Gregorio Piaia. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2009. 83–90. [Mainly on the Augustinian elements in Utopia.]
  11. Grace, Damian. Utopia and Academic Scepticism. [1995] See In Defence of Humanism and Poetry.
  12. Wegemer, Gerard. Utopia: A Model Respublica of Peace, Liberty and Self-Government. Young Thomas More and the Arts of Liberty. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, . 139–59.

Utopia and Lucian

  1. Crossett, John. More and Lucian. Modern Language Notes 72 (1957): 169–70. [Geritz R076; Sullivan 1:231. On Charon 12, as a source for the claim in Utopia that iron is better than gold.]
  2. Dorsch, T. S. Sir Thomas More and Lucian: An Interpretation of Utopia. Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen 203 (1967): 345–63. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 166–184. Pp. 349–63 rpt. as A Detestable State. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliff, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 88–99. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 14 (1967): 117; Geritz R107; Wentworth 406.]
  3. Wooden, Warren W. Thomas More and Lucian: A Study in Satiric Influence and Technique. University of Mississippi: Studies in English 13 (1972): 44–57. [Geritz R445; Wentworth 421.]
  4. Branham, R. Bracht. Utopian Laughter: Lucian and Thomas More. Moreana 86 (1985): 23–43. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana83-84pages51-53.pdf [Geritz R055; Wentworth 466.]
  5. Ginzburg, Carlo. The Old World and the New Seen from Nowhere. No Island is an Island: Four Glances at English Literature from a World Perspective. New York: Columbia UP, 2000. 1–25, 90–96.
    Review(s):
    1. Miguel Martinez López, Utopian Studies 12 (2001): 186–88.

See also Translation of Lucian

Other Classical Sources (Excluding Plato)

  1. Hadas, Moses. Utopian Sources in Herodotus. Classical Philology 30 (1935): 113–21.
  2. Fyfe, W. Hamilton. Tacitus's Germania and More's Utopia. Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada 3rd ser. 30 (1936), sec. 2: 57–59. [Sullivan 1:380.]
  3. Schoeck, Richard J. More's Attic Nights: Sir Thomas More's Use of Aulus Gellius' Noctes Atticae, and Aulus Gellius: A Post-Praefatio. [1960] See Thomas More and the Classics
  4. Crossett, John. More and Herodotus. Notes and Queries ns 7 (1960): 366–67. [Geritz R078; Sullivan 1:231.]
  5. Crossett, John. More and Seneca. [1961] See Dialogue, Dialectic and Drama.
  6. Field, P. J. C. The Emperor Constantine and Pythagoras. Moreana 47/48 (1975): 21–23. [Geritz R134. Two notes: 1. On the Roman visit to Utopia (CW 4: 108); 2. On Pythagoras as a possible source for the Utopian chess-like games (rithmomachia) at CW 4: 128/19&n.]
  7. Kytzler, Bernhard. Marginalia Utopia: Acht Beobachtungen zur Utopia des Thomas Morus (1478–1978). Arktouros: Hellenic Studies Presented to Bernard M. W. Knox on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday. Ed. Bernhard Macgregor Walker Knox, Glen W. Bowersock, Walter Burkert and Michael C. J. Putnam. Berlin-New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1979. 447–60.
  8. Ijsewijn, Jozef. Traces de Tacite et César dans l'Utopie. Moreana 65/66 (1980): 32.
  9. Allen, Ward. St. John Chrysostom: A Footnote to Utopia. Moreana 78 (1983): 21–22. [Geritz R011.]
  10. Baumann, Uwe. Herodotus, Aulus Gellius and Thomas More's Utopia. Moreana 77 (1983): 5–10. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana77pages5-10.pdf [Geritz R031; Wentworth 402.]
  11. Dust, Philip. Two Allusions to the Iliad in the Utopia. Moreana 98/99 (1988): 213–14. [Geritz R120.]
  12. Parrish, John Michael. A New Source for More's Utopia. Historical Journal 40 (1997): 493–98. [On Seneca's De Otio as a possible source for Utopia.]

See also Utopia: Utopian Chickens, Gold and Chamber Pots

Utopia and Plato

  1. Berger, Lina. Thomas Morus und Plato: ein Beitrag zur Geschichte des Humanismus. Zeitschrift für die gesamte Staatswissenschaft 35 (1879): 187–216, 405–83.
  2. Cassirer, Ernst. The Platonic Renaissance in England. Trans. James P. Pettegrove. Austin: U of Texas P, 1953. 22–24, 107–111, 119–120, 172–173, 186–187. Rpt. in Part as Religion without Dogma. Twentienth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 106–108. [Geritz R067; Wentworth 32; Sullivan 1:174.]
  3. Falke, Rita. Thomas More—Imo, velut Plato. Bulletin de l'Association Guillaume Budé 4th ser. (1956), no. 2: 89–96.
  4. Miles, Leland. The Platonic Source of Utopia's Minimum Religion. Renaissance News 9 (1956): 83–90. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 49–56. [Geritz R284; Wentworth 409. Plato's Laws and Republic as sources for Utopian religious practises.]
  5. Barker, Ernest. Appendix B: The Later History of the Republic. The Political Thought of Plato and Aristotle. London: Methuen, 1906, 1959. 525–30. Pp. 326–29 Rpt. as [Sir Ernest Barker: Utopia and Plato's Republic]. Twentieth Century Interpretations of Utopia. Ed. William Nelson. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1968. 100–02. [Geritz R028; Sullivan S2:10.]
  6. Walsh, Chad. From Utopia to Nightmare. Westport, CT: Greenwood P, 1962. 40–45. [Geritz R420; Wentworth 645.]
  7. Mölk, Ulrich. Philologische Bemerkungen Zu Thomas Morus' Utopia. Anglia 82 (1964): 309–20. [Geritz R288. On Plato, Cicero's Somnium Scipionis and Lucian as background to Utopia.]
  8. Gleason, John B. Sun Worship in More's Utopia. [1965] See Religion and Theology.
  9. Neumann, Harry. On the Platonism of More's Utopia. Social Research 30 (1966): 495–512. [Geritz R302; Wentworth 523. Character-More speaks for the author.]
  10. Stevens, Richard G. On the Practicality of More's Utopia. Social Research 33 (1966): 30–46. [Geritz R388; Wentworth 561. On property in Utopia and on Utopian communism.]
  11. Billard, Claude. La probleme de la justice dans la Republique de Platon et l'Utopie de Thomas More. Diss. Université de Paris-Nanterre, 1967.
    Review(s):
    1. Marie-Claude Rousseau, Moreana 18 (1968): 99–101.
  12. Steintrager, James. Plato and More's Utopia. Social Research 36 (1969): 357–72. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 233–248. [Geritz R385; Wentworth 457. On Plato's Republic and More's Utopia.]
  13. Jones, Judith P. The Philebus and the Philosophy of Pleasure in Thomas More's Utopia. [1971] See Epicurus, Pleasure and Moral Philosophy.
  14. White, Thomas, I. A Study of the Influence of Plato and Aristotle on Thomas More's Utopia. Diss. Columbia 1974.
  15. Marc'hadour, Germain. Thomas More entre Aristote et Platon. [1976] See Aristotle, Cicero and Augustine.
  16. Gordon, Walter M. The Platonic Dramaturgy of Thomas More's Dialogues. [1978] See Thomas More: Literary Dialogue.
  17. Baker-Smith, Dominic. Thomas More and Plato's Voyage: An Inaugural Lecture given on 1st June 1978 at University College Cardiff. Cardiff: University College Cardiff P, 1978. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 39–55. [On Renaissance Platonism and Neo-Platonism as a background to Utopia: Plato, Valla, Pico, Ficino, Savonarola, and Erasmus' Moria.]
  18. Gueguen, John A. Reading More's Utopia as a Criticism of Plato. Quincentennial Essays on St. Thomas More. Ed. Michael J. Moore. Boone, NC: Albion, 1978. 43–54. [Geritz R168; Wentworth 442.]
  19. Schaeffer, John D. Socratic Method in More's Utopia. Moreana 69 (1981): 5–20. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana69pages5-20.pdf [Geritz R355; Wentworth 487.]
  20. White, Thomas I. Pride and the Public Good: Thomas More's Use of Plato in Utopia. Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (1982): 329–54. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. II: 169–194. [Geritz 432; Wentworth 419.]
    Review(s):
    1. David Bradshaw, Moreana 83/84 (1984): 51–53. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana83-84pages51-53.pdf
  21. Baker-Smith, Dominic. The Escape from the Cave: Thomas More and the Vision of Utopia. Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters 15 (1985): 148–61. Rpt. in Between Dream and Nature: Essays on Utopia and Dystopia. Ed. Dominic Baker-Smith and C. C. Barfoot. Costerus, ns 61. Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters Studies in Literature 2. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1987. 5–19. [Sum.: G. M. Moreana 94 (1987): 74; Geritz R022; Wentworth 572. On Plato, Ficino and Pico as background to Utopia.]
  22. Dougherty, James. Geometries of Perfection: Atlantis, Utopia and the City of the Sun. [1986] See More, Bacon and Campanella.
  23. Wegemer, Gerard B. The Literary and Philosophic Design of Thomas More's Utopia. [1986] See Aristotle, Cicero and Augustine.
  24. Miething, Christoph. Politeia und Utopia: Zur Epistemologie de literarischen Utopie. Germanisch-Romanische Monatsschrift 37.3 (1987): 247–63. [Geritz R283. Compares More to Plato and Dante.]
  25. Opanasets, Nicholas. More Platonism. [1989] See Raphael Hythloday as Narrator.
  26. Corrigan, Kevin. The Function of the Ideal in Plato's Republic and St. Thomas More's Utopia. Moreana 104 (1990): 27–49. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana104pages27-49.pdf [Sum.: p.49; Geritz R074; Wentworth 435. On Utopia and Plato's Republic, and Erasmus' Praise of Folly (pp. 39–41).]
  27. Slavin, Arthur J. Platonism and the Problem of Counsel in Utopia. [1990] See Book One, Europe, the Dialogue of Counsel, and Reform.
  28. Starnes, Colin. The New Republic: A Commentary on Book I of More's Utopia Showing Its Relation to Plato's Republic. Waterloo, Ont.: Wilfrid Laurier UP, 1990. [Geritz R384.]
    Review(s):
    1. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 219–22.
    2. Aleksandar Pavkovic, Moreana 113 (1993): 91–94.
  29. Baker-Smith, Dominic. Uses of Plato by Erasmus and More. Platonism and the English Imagination. Edited by Anna Baldwin and Sarah Hutton. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1994. 86–99. (http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511553806.010)
  30. Baker-Smith, Dominic. Civitas philosophica: Ideas and Community in Thomas More. Forme del neoplatonismo: dall'eredità ficiniana ai Platonici di Cambridge: atti del Convegno, Firenze, 25–27 ottobre 2001. Ed. Luisa Simonutti. Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 2007. 221–34. Rev. version in A Companion to Thomas More. Ed. A. D. Cousins, and Damian Grace. Madison, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson UP, 2009. 165–177. [Sum.: pp.15–16. Discusses both Plato and Lucian, and Renaissance neo-platonic background of Utopia.]
  31. Lacroix, Jean-Yves. L'Utopia de Thomas More et la tradition platonicienne. De Pétrarque à Descartes 74. Paris: J. Vrin, 2007.
  32. Quattrocchi, Ed. Life Imitates Poetry: What Thomas More and George Orwell owe to Plato's Republic. Caxtonian: Journal of the Caxton Club [Newberry Library, Chicago] 17:9 (Sep. 2009): 1, 3–6. Online at http://www.caxtonclub.org/reading/2009/sep09.pdf [Plato's Myth of the Cave as a paradigm for Utopia and 1984.]
  33. Cro, Stelio. Music and Otherness in More's Utopia. Moreana 51:197–198 (Dec. 2014): 181–209. [Sum.: pp.181–82. Deals with Music in Plato's Timaeus and Republic, More's Utopia, Rousseau, Ortega y Gasset, and the Swiss music theorist Ernest Ansermet.]
  34. Lehman, Jeffrey S. Passing Strange, Yet Wholly True: On the Political Tales of Plato's Critias and More's Hythlodaeus. Thomas More: Why Patron of Statesmen? Edited by Travis Curtright. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2015. 55–73. [Sum.: p.2.]

See also Utopia: Social and Political Philosophy

Utopia and the Middle Ages

  1. White, Helen C. The Utopia and Commonwealth Tradition. [1944] See Social and Political Philosophy.
  2. Duhamel, P. Albert. Medievalism of More's Utopia. Studies in Philology 52 (1955): 99–126. Rpt. in Essential Articles for the Study of Thomas More. Ed. Richard S. Sylvester and Germain Marc'hadour. Hamden, CT: Archon, 1977. 234–50, 616–20. [Geritz R116; Wentworth 591.]
  3. Seibt, Ferdinand. Neues Zeitalter und Neue Welt: Joachim und Morus. Utopica: Modelle Totaler Sozialplanung. Düsseldorf: Verlag L. Schwann, 1972. 24–47.
  4. Seibt, Ferdinand. Liber Figurarum XII and the Classical Ideal of Utopia. Prophecy and Millenarianism: Essays in Honour of Marjorie Reeves. Ed. Ann Williams. London: Longman, 1980. 257–72.
  5. Renna, Thomas. More's Utopia and English Medieval Traditions. Utopia e modernità: Teorie e prassi utopiche nell'etaà moderna e postmoderna. Ed. Guiseppa Saccaro Del Buffa, and Andrew O. Lewis. Vol. 1. Rome: Gangemi editore, 1989. 739–47.
  6. Bejczy, István Pieter. Pape Jansland en Utopie: De verbeelding van de beschaving van middeleeuven en renaissance. [The land of Prester John and Utopia: The Representation of the Civilizations of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.] Nijmegen: Universitair Publikatiebureau, 1994. French Version: La Lettre du prêtre Jean, une utopie médiévale. Paris: Imago, 2001. [Geritz R034. Bejczy's doctoral dissertation in Dutch with French summary. Contrasts the 12th Century Letter of Prester John with More's Utopia.]
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 127/28 (1996): 117–118.
    2. Fred J. Nichols, Renaissance Quarterly 50:1 (1997): 297–98.
    3. Derk Visser, Sixteenth Century Journal 26:4 (1995): 931–32.
    4. (French) Carol J. Harvey, Speculum 79:1 (2004): 129–31.
  7. Bejczy, István. L'Utopie et le moyen âge: la purgation de l'histoire. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 29–42. [Sum.: pp. 287–89; Geritz R036. In contrast to Duhamel's view Bejczy argues for the wholesale anti-historical elimination of medieval culture in Hythloday's account of Utopia.]

Utopia Through the Ages

Early Modern Reception of Utopia

  1. Honke, Gudrun. Die Rezeption der Utopia im frühen 16. Jahrhundert. Utopieforschung: Interdisziplinäre Studien zur neuzeitlichen Utopie. [Utopia: Interdisciplinary Studies on modern Utopias] Ed. Wilhelm Voßkamp. 3 vols. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzler, 1982. 2: 167–82.
  2. Kreyssig, Jenny. Die Utopia des Thomas Morus. Studien zur Rezeptionsgeschichte und zum Bedeutungskontext [Thomas More's Utopia: Studies on its Context and Reception]. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1988. [Geritz R223.]
    Review(s):
    1. G. R. Elton, English Historical Review 107 (1992): 460–61.
  3. Dethloff, Uwe. Die Rezeption von Thomas Mores Utopia in der französischen Renaissance. [1993] See Utopia: French Translations.
  4. Appelbaum, Robert. Utopia and Utopianism. The Oxford Handbook of English Prose, 1500–1640. Edited by Andrew Hadfield. Oxford: Oxford UP, 253–66.

See also Thomas More: Reception and Influence

More, Bacon, Andreae, Campanella and Burton

  1. Limanowski, Bołeslaw. Dwaj znakomici Komuniści, T. Morus i T. Campanella, i ich systematy: Utopija i Państwo Słoneczne. Studyjum socyjologiczne. Lwów: 1873. [Worldcat OCLC 560525646; Sullivan 2:237. Polish.]
  2. Adams, Robert P. The Social Responsibilities of Science in Utopia, New Atlantis and After. Journal of the History of Ideas 10 (1949): 374–98. Rpt. in Renaissance Essays from the Journal of the History of Ideas. Ed. Paul Oskar Kristeller and P. P. Weiner. New York: Harper & Row, 1968. 137–61. [Geritz R006; Wentworth 431; Sullivan S2:2.]
  3. Frietzsche, Arthur H. The Impact of Applied Science Upon the Utopian Ideal. Brigham Young University Studies 3:3/4 (Spr./Sum. 1961): 35–42. [Sum.: W. E. Morris, AES 5 (1962): 2527.]
  4. Polak, Frederik L. The Image of the Future, Enlightening the Past, Orientating the Present, Forecasting the Future. Trans. from the Dutch by Elise Boulding. Vol. 1. The Promised Land, Source of Living Culture. European Aspects, Series A: Culture, no. 1. Leydon: Sythoff; New York: Oceana, 1961. 220–25. [Geritz R325; Wentworth 453. On More, Bacon, and Campanella.]
  5. Foriers, Paul. Les Utopies et le droit. [1963] See Utopian Communism, Law, Property and Prosperity.
  6. Bierman, Judah. Science and Society in the New Atlantis and Other Renaissance Utopias. Publications of the Modern Language Association of America 78 (1963): 492–500. [Sum.: G. M. Moreana 2 (1964): 114; Geritz R040; Wentworth 538; Sullivan S2:16. On Bacon's New Atlantis, compared with More's Utopia, Campanella's City of the Sun, and Andreae's Christianopolis as background.]
  7. Gillespie, Gerald. Education in Utopia. Europäische Lehrdictung: Festschrift für Walter Naumann zum 70. Geburtstag. Ed. Hans Gerd Rötzer and Herbert Walz. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1981. 119–31. [Geritz R155; Wentworth 551. On utopian education in More, Rabelais, Campanella, Johann Valentin Andreae, and Bacon.]
  8. Le Doeuff, Michèle. Utopias: Scholarly. Trans. S. Rotenstreich. Social Research 49 (1982): 441–66. [On the importance of schools and education in More's Utopia, Bacon's New Atlantis and Campanella's City of the Sun.]
  9. Dougherty, James. Geometries of Perfection: Atlantis, Utopia and the City of the Sun. Soundings 69 (1986): 310–25. [On Campanella's City of the Sun, Plato's Critias and More's Utopia.]
  10. Albanese, Denise. The New Atlantis and the Uses of Utopia. English Literary History 57 (1990): 503–28. Rpt. New Science, New World. Durham, NC: Duke UP, 1996. 92–120. [Geritz I001.]
  11. Clarke, I. F. From Space to Time: The Future is Another Place. Futures 22 (1990): 752–60 + 2 plates. [Sum.: p.752. On Bacon, Rabelais, and More as inventors of other worlds.]
  12. Leslie, Marina Ann. Patterns for Perfecting: Utopian Method in Thomas More and Francis Bacon. Diss. Yale U, 1991. [Geritz R231.]
  13. D'Agata D'Ottavi, Stefania. Tra due utopie. Per una definizione dell'utopia: Metodologie e discipline a confronto. Atti del Convengo Internazionale di Bagni di Lucca 12–14 settembre 1990. Ed. Nadia Minerva. Forme dell'Utopia 1. Ravenna: Longo, 1992. 71–80. [Geritz R108. On Utopia and the New Atlantis.]
  14. Dupré, Louis. Passage to Modernity: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Nature and Culture. New Haven: Yale UP, 1993. 151–52, 193–94. [Geritz R118.]
  15. Bruce, Susan. Virgins on the World and Feasts of the Family: Sex and the Social Order in Two Renaissance Utopias. English Renaissance Prose: History, Language, and Politics. Ed. Neil Rhodes. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 164. Tempe, AZ: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1997. 125–46.
  16. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. "Robert Burton/Democritus Junior and Thomas More." Moreana 35:135/136 (1998): 55–74. [Summ.: pp.55–56.]
  17. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. Reimagining the Aftermath of the Fall. Three Dystopian/Utopian Narratives in Jacobean England. Thomas More . . . and More: Freundesgabe für / Liber Amicorum for Hubertus Schulte Herbrüggen. Edited by Christoph M. Peters and Friedrich-K. Unterweg. Frankfort am Main; New York: Peter Lang, 2002. 323–345. Rpt. Moreana 52:201–202 (2015): 171–199. [Summ.: Gerhard Helmstaedter, Moreana 156 (2003): 114. Deals with Bacon, Hall and Burton. Briefly mentions More.]
  18. Chloe Houston. Knowledge Shall be Increased: Natural Philosophy and Religion in the Early Modern Utopia. Literature Compass 4:5 (September 2007): 1397–1411. (DOI)
  19. Phélippeau, Marie-Claire. The Poetics of Water in 16th and 17th Century Utopias: More, Bacon, Rabelais. Moreana 51:197–198 (Dec. 2014): 67–82. [Sum.: pp.67–68.]
  20. Seidl, Horst. Notes on the Difference between Fictional and Real Dialogues, with Reference to Thomas More's Utopia and Francis Bacon's New Atlantis. Imaginary Dialogues in English: Explorations of a Literary Form. Ed. T. Kinzel and J. Mildorf. Germanisch Romanische Monatsschrift 46. Heidelburg: Universitätsverlag Winter, 2012. 31–40.

More, Castiglione, Spenser, and Sidney

  1. Barnes, W. J. Irony and the English Apprehension of Renewal. [1966] See Irony, Paradox, Humour and Satire.
  2. Altman, Joel B. Propedeutic for Drama: Questions as Fiction. The Tudor Play of Mind: Rhetorical Inquiry and the Development of Elizabethan Drama. Berkeley: U of California P, 1978. 64–106, esp. 79–87, 126–29. [Geritz R015; Wentworth 505. On Castiglione's Courtier, More's Utopia, and Sidney's Arcadia. Draws heavily on W. Trimpi's The Quality of Fiction: Rhetorical Transmission of Literary Theory, Traditio 30 (1974): 1–118.]
  3. Lanham, Richard A. More, Castiglione, and the Humanist Choice of Utopias. Acts of Interpretation: The Text in its Contexts, 700–1600. Essays on Medieval and Renaissance Literature in Honor of E. Talbot Donaldson. Ed. Mary J. Carruthers and Elizabeth D. Kirk. Norman, OK: Pilgrim Books, 1982. 327–43. Rpt. with minor changes as The Choice of Utopias: More or Castiglione. Literacy and the Survival of Humanism. New Haven: Yale UP, 1983. 24–40. [Wentworth 448. Naively identifies Author More with Hythloday throughout. Contrasted briefly with Castiglione (338–43).]
  4. Evans, Scott D. A Divine Consideration: Utopia in Sidney's Defence of Poetry. Moreana 125 (1996): 7–29. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana125pages7-29.pdf [Sum.: pp. 120–121; Geritz I038.]
  5. Headley, John M. The Problem of Counsel Revisited: More, Castiglione and the Resignation of Office in the Sixteenth Century. See More's Political Career and Thought.

More and Erasmus

  1. Adams, Robert P. Designs by More and Erasmus for a New Social Order. Studies in Philology 42 (1945): 131–45. Rpt. in More. Great Political Thinkers 6. Ed. John Dunn and Ian Harris. 2 vols. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publications, 1997. I: 34–48. [Geritz R004; Wentworth 400. On neo-Stoic elements in Erasmus and in More's Utopia.]
  2. Major, J. Russell. The Renaissance Monarchy as Seen by Erasmus, More, Seyssel and Machiavelli. [1969] See More, Machiavelli, Seyssel and Bodin.
  3. Crofts, Richard. A. Three Renaissance Expressions of Societal Responsibility: Thomas More, Desiderium [sic] Erasmus, and Thomas Müntzer. Sixteenth Century Journal 3:2 (1972): 11–24. [More as conservative, Erasmus as liberal, and Müntzer as radical.]
  4. Kinney, Arthur F. Rhetoric as Poetic: Humanist Fiction in the Renaissance. [1976] See Rhetoric, Fiction and Poetics.
  5. Berger, Harry, Jr. Utopian Folly: Erasmus and More on the Perils of Misanthropy. English Literary Renaissance 12 (1982): 271–90. Rpt. in Second World and Green World: Studies in Renaissance Fiction-Making. Intro. J. P. Lynch. Berkeley: U of California P, 1988. 229–48. [Sum.: K. Schoening, Comitatus 20 (1989): 91; Geritz R037; Wentworth 433. Folly and Hythloday as misanthropists.]
  6. Fox, Alistair. English Humanism and the Body Politic. Reassessing the Henrician Age: Humanism, Politics, and Reform 1500–1550. By Alistair Fox and John Guy. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1986. 35–51, esp.37–41. [Geritz R136; Wentworth 441. Contrasts Utopia with Erasmus's political thought.]
  7. Patrides, C. A. Erasmus and More: Dialogues with Reality. Kenyon Review ns 8 (1986): 34–48. Rpt. Figures in a Renaissance Context. Ed. Claude J. Summers and Ted-Larry Pebworth. Ann Arbor, MI: U of Michigan P, 1989. 7–27. [Geritz L020; Wentworth 452. On the Praise of Folly and the Utopia.]
  8. Kaufman, Peter Iver. Humanist Spirituality and Ecclesial Reaction: Thomas More's Monstra. [1987] See Religion and Theology.
  9. Olin, John C. Erasmus' Adagia and More's Utopia: In Memoriam Margaret Mann Phillips. Miscellanea Moreana: Essays for Germain Marc'hadour. Moreana 100: Volume XXVI Mélanges Marc'hadour. Ed. Clare M. Murphy, Henri Gibaud and Mario A. Di Cesare. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 61. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1989. 127–36. Available online at http://www.thomasmorestudies.org/moreana/Moreana100pages127-136.pdf Rpt. in Erasmus, Utopia, and the Jesuits: Essays on the Outreach of Humanism. New York: Fordham UP, 1994. xv, 55–69. [Sum.: Moreana 98/99 (1988): 156, 250 + rpt. p.xv; Geritz R307 and R308; Wentworth 451.]
  10. Corrigan, Kevin. The Function of the Ideal in Plato's Republic and St. Thomas More's Utopia. [1990] See Utopia and Plato.
  11. Wootton, David. Friendship Portrayed: A New Account of Utopia. History Workshop Journal 45 (1998): 25–47. [Sum.: Historical Abstracts]
  12. Levi, Anthony. The New Century to 1516: Utopia and the Novum Instrumentum. Renaissance and Reformation: the intellectual genesis. New Haven: Yale UP, 2002. 230–56.
  13. Freeman, John. Utopia, Incorporated: Reassessing Intellectual Property Rights to the Island. English Literary Renaissance 37:1 (2007): 3–33. [On Erasmus as editor of Utopia.]
  14. Parrish, John M. Education, Erasmian humanism and More’s Utopia. Oxford Review of Education 36:5 (2010): 589–605. (doi)

See also More and Erasmus.

More, Machiavelli, Seyssel and Bodin

  1. Ellinger, Georg. Thomas Morus und Machiavelli. Vierteljahrschrift für Kultur und Literatur der Renaissance 2 (1887): 17–26. [Cited in CW 4: 430.]
  2. Maxey, Chester C. Strange Interlude. Political Philosophies. New York: Macmillan, 1938, rev. ed. 1948. 125–53. [Geritz R261; Wentworth 616. On More, Machiavelli and Plato.]
  3. Harbison, E. Harris. The Intellectual as Social Reformer: Machiavelli and Thomas More. Rice Institute Pamphlets 44:3 (1957): 1–46. Rpt. in Christianity and History Princeton: Princeton UP, 1964. 204–48. Rpt. as Machiavelli's Prince and More's Utopia. Facets of the Renaissance. Ed. William H. Werkmeister. Evanston, NY: Harper and Row, 1959, 1963. 41–71. [Geritz L009 and R183; Wentworth #445.]
  4. Hexter, J. H. The Loom of Language and the Fabric of Imperatives: The Case of Il Principe and Utopia. American Historical Review 69 (1964): 945–68. Rev. vers. as The Predatory and the Utopian Vision: Machiavelli and More. The Loom of Language and the Fabric of Imperatives: The Case of Il Principe and Utopia. The Vision of Politics on the Eve of the Reformation: More, Machiavelli, and Seyssel. New York: Basic Books; London: Allen Lane, 1973. 179–202. [Geritz R191; Wentworth 470.]
  5. Hexter, J. H. Claude de Seyssel and Normal Politics in the Age of Machiavelli. Art, Science and History in the Renaissance. Ed. Charles S. Singleton. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins P, 1967. 389–415. Rev. vers. as The Predatory, the Utopian, and the Constitutional Vision: Machiavelli, More, and Claude de Seyssel. La Monarchie de France and Normal Politics on the Eve of the Reformation. The Vision of Politics on the Eve of the Reformation: More, Machiavelli, and Seyssel. New York: Basic Books; London, Allen Lane, 1973. 204–30. [Geritz R189; Wentworth 446.]
  6. Paul, Leslie. Machiavelli and More. Moreana 15/16 (1967): 141–44. [More ultimately more realistic than Machiavelli.]
  7. Major, J. Russell. The Renaissance Monarchy as Seen by Erasmus, More, Seyssel and Machiavelli. Action and Conviction in Early Modern Europe. Ed. Theodore K. Rabb and Jerrold E. Seigel. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1969. 17–31.
  8. Telle, Émile V. Thomas More dans La République de Jean Bodin. Moreana 27/28 (1970): 103–106.
  9. Hexter, J. H. The Vision of Politics on the Eve of the Reformation: More, Machiavelli, and Seyssel. New York: Basic Books; London: Allen Lane, 1973. [Geritz R196. Reprints various articles by Hexter, including his introduction to the Yale Edition of More's Utopia. Some chapters also listed separately.]
  10. Schoeck, Richard J. Bodin's Opposition to the Mixed State and to Thomas More. Jean Bodin. Ed. Horst Denzer. München: Verlag C. H. Beck, 1973. 399–412.
  11. Adams, Robert M. The Prince and the Phalanx. Sir Thomas More: Utopia. Ed. Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1975. 192–203. [Geritz R003; Wentworth 430.]
  12. Rowse, A. L. Utopia versus Realism. Discoveries and Reviews: From Renaissance to Restoration. New York: MacMillan P, 1975. 140–44. [A review of Hexter's The Vision of Politics.]
  13. Cro, Stelio. Machiavelli e l'antiutopia. Machiavelli attuale/Machiavel actuel. Ed. Georges Bathouil. Ravenna: Longo, 1982. 27–33.
  14. Di Scipio, Guiseppe C. De re militari in Machiavelli's Prince and More's Utopia. [1983] See War and Peace in Utopia.
  15. Tinkler, John F. Praise and Advice: Rhetorical Approaches in More's Utopia and Machiavelli's The Prince. Sixteenth Century Journal 19 (1988): 187–207. [Geritz R413; Wentworth 491.]
    Review(s):
    1. P. A. Marks, Moreana 98/99 (1988): 95–99.
  16. Copenhaver, Brian P., and Charles B. Schmitt. Politics and Moral Disorder: Erasmus, More and Machiavelli. Renaissance Philosophy. History of Western Philosophy 3. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1992. 269–84. [Deals briefly with Erasmus (272–74), More's Utopia (274–78), and Machiavelli (278–84).]
  17. Morgan, Nicole S. Utilitas et Honestas: L'Étrange pari de Thomas More et de Machiavel. Carrefour: Revue de la Société de Philosophie de l'Outauouais [Ottawa] 14:2 (1992): 93–104. [Sum.: p. 93; G.M. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 269.]
  18. Quarta, Cosimo. Morus und Macchiavelli. Europa: Wiege des Humanismus und der Reformation. 5 Internationales Symposion der Amici Thomas Mori 20. bis 27. Mai 1995 in Mainz. Dokumentation. Ed. Hermann Boventer and Uwe Baumann. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1997. 197–209.

Utopia: Milton and Shakespeare

  1. El-Gabalawy, Saad. Christian Communism in Utopia, King Lear and Comus. University of Toronto Quarterly 47 (1978): 228–38. [Geritz R123; Wentworth 549.]
  2. Hibbard, G. R. Sequestration into Atlantick and Eutopian polities: Milton on More. Renaissance and Reformation ns 4 (1980): 209–25. [Mainly on Shakespeare and More.]
  3. Gardette, Raymond. Une fable humaniste: la conquête de l'île de nulle part de More à Shakespeare. Shakespeare: Cosmopolitisme et insularité. Ed. Marie-Thérèse Jones-Davies. Paris: Belles Lettres, 1994. 15–34. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 276.]

See also More and Shakespeare.

More, Rabelais, Montaigne and Voltaire

  1. Lefranc, Abel. Le Voyage de Pantagruel en Utopie. Les navigations de Pantagruel: étude sur la géographie Rabelaisienne. Paris, Henri Leclerc, 1904. 9–23. Online at https://archive.org/details/lesnavigationsd00lefrgoog. [Sullivan 2:221.]
  2. Saulnier, V. L. Mythologies pantagruéliques. L'Utopie en France: Morus et Rabelais. Les Utopies à la Renaissance. Travaux de l'Institut pour l'Étude de la Renaissance et de l'Humanisme 1. Brussels: Presses Universitaires de Bruxelles; Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1963. 135–62. [Sum.: J. Jacques, Moreana 10 (1966): 49–50.]
  3. Baraz, Michael. Rabelais et l'Utopie. Études Rabelaisiennes 15. Travaux d'humanisme et Renaissance 175. Geneva: Droz, 1980. 1–29.
  4. Gillespie, Gerald. Education in Utopia. [1981] See More, Bacon, and Campanella.
  5. Herrmann, Léon. L'Utopien et le Lanternois. [1981] See Names in Utopia and the Utopian Language.
  6. Helgerson, Richard. Inventing Noplace, or the Power of Negative Thinking. The Power of Forms in the English Renaissance. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. Norman, OK: Pilgrim Books, 1982. 101–21. Also publ. in Genre 15 (1982): 101–21. [Geritz R186; Wentworth 600. On negation in More's Utopia and Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel.]
  7. Berrong, Richard M. On the Possible Origin of the Name Nephelibates (Quart Livre, Ch. 56). Études rabelaisiennes 17 (1983): 93–94. [Geritz I010.]
  8. Ziegler, Paul R. The New World and Christian Humanism: Three Views. Proceedings of the PMR Conference 8 (1983): 89–95. [On Peter Martyr's, More's, and Montaigne's views of the New World.]
  9. Clarke, I. F. From Space to Time: The Future is Another Place. [1990] See More, Bacon and Campanella.
  10. Murphy, Claire M. Le pays d'Eldorado dans Candide de Voltaire et l'île utopique de More. Voix d'Ouest en Europe, Souffles d'Europe en Ouest. Ed. Georges Cesbron. Angers: Presses de l'Université d'Angers, 1993. 251–57. Rev. version in The Island of Utopia and Voltaire's Country of Eldorado. More's Utopia and the Utopian Inheritance. Ed. A. D. Cousins, and Damian Grace. Lanham, MY: University Press of America, 1995. 109–117. [Geritz I082.]
  11. Olin, John C. More, Montaigne and Matthew Arnold: Thoughts on the Utopian Vision. Erasmus, Utopia, and the Jesuits: Essays on the Outreach of Humanism. New York: Fordham UP, 1994. xv, 71–84. Rpt. in part as More, Montaigne, Voltaire and Matthew Arnold: Thoughts on the Utopian Vision. More's Utopia and the Utopian Inheritance. Ed. A. D. Cousins, and Damian Grace. Lanham, MY: University Press of America, 1995. 99–107. [Sum.: p. xv; Geritz R308 and R310. On More, Rabelais, Montaigne, Swift, Voltaire and Matthew Arnold.]
    Review(s):
    1. Elizabeth McCutcheon, Utopian Studies 10:1 (1999): 251–253.
  12. Phélippeau, Marie-Claire. The Poetics of Water in 16th and 17th Century Utopias: More, Bacon, Rabelais. [2014] See More, Bacon and Campanella.

More, Joseph Hall and Swift

  1. Davis, Herbert, et al., eds. The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift. 13 vols. London: Basil Blackwell, 1939–59. Vol. 4. A Proposal for Correcting the English Language. Polite Conversation, Etc., 71; Vol. 5, Miscellaneous and Other Autobiographical Pieces, Fragments and Marginalia, xi, 84, 247–48; Vol. 11, Gulliver's Travels 1726, 8, 196. [Geritz I026. See also Gibson nos. 543, 544, 856.]
  2. Frietzsche, Arthur H. The Impact of Applied Science Upon the Utopian Ideal. [1961] See More, Bacon and Campanella.
  3. Nourse, Joan Thelluson The Rational Realms of More and Swift. A Christian Approach to Western Literature. Ed. Aloysius A. Norton and Joan Thelluson Nourse. Westminster, MA: Newman P, 1961. 217–37. [On Utopia and Book IV of Gulliver's Travels: discusses uses of satiric techniques in both works.]
  4. Traugott, John. A Voyage to Nowhere with Thomas More and Jonathan Swift: Utopia and The Voyage to the Houyhnhnms. Sewanee Review 69 (1961): 534–65. Rpt. in Swift: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Ernest Tuveson. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1964. 143–69. [Geritz R415; Wentworth 460.]
  5. Vickers, Brian. The Satiric Structure of Gulliver's Travels and More's Utopia. The World of Jonathan Swift. Ed. Brian Vickers. Oxford: Blackwell; Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1968. 233–57. [Geritz I118; Wentworth 427.]
  6. Mezciems, Jenny. The Unity of Swift's Voyage to Laputa: Structure as Meaning in Utopian Fiction. Modern Language Review 72 (1977): 1–21. [Book III of Gulliver's Travels is seen in the tradition of Utopian literature deriving from Plato, More and Rabelais. It is also a parody of Bacon's New Atlantis.]
  7. Brink, J. R. From the Utopians to the Yahoos: Thomas More and Jonathan Swift. Journal of the Rutgers University Libraries 42 (1980): 59–66.
  8. Wands, John Millar Antipodal Imperfection: Hall's Mundus Alter et Idem and its Debt to More's Utopia. Moreana 69 (1981): 85–100. [Geritz I120.]
  9. Hammond, Eugene R. Nature—Reason—Justice in Utopia and Gulliver's Travels. Studies in English Literature 22 (1982): 445–68. [Geritz R181; Wentworth 444. See also the same author's In Praise of Wisdom and the Will of God: Erasmus' Praise of Folly and Swift's A Tale of a Tub. Studies in Philology 80 (1983): 253–76.]
  10. Mezciems, Jenny. Utopia and the Thing which is not: More, Swift, and Others Lying Idealists. University of Toronto Quarterly 52 (1982): 40–62. [Geritz R282; Wentworth 482. Includes a discussion of the conclusions of Utopia and Gulliver's Travels.]
  11. Wands, John Millar. Mundus Alter et Idem and Menippean Satire. Another World and Yet the Same: Bishop Joseph Hall's Mundus Alter et Idem. New Haven: Yale UP, 1981. xv–xli. [Sum.: Jacques Gury, Moreana 73 (1982): 66. Discusses Halls indebtedness to More and Erasmus and parallels with Swift. For another book about Joseph Hall, see also G. M. Moreana 93 (1987): 103–106.]
  12. Mezciems, Jenny. Swift's Praise of Gulliver: Some Renaissance Background to the Travels. The Character of Swift's Satire: A Revised Focus. Ed. Claude Rawson. Newark: U of Delaware P, 1983. 245–81. [Geritz I078; Wentworth 450.]
  13. Donnelly, Dorothy F. Utopia and Gulliver's Travels: Another Perspective. Moreana 97 (1988): 115–24. [Geritz R100; Wentworth 436. Gulliver's Travels as anti-utopian literature.]
  14. Di Luca, Adolfo. Inventio and Fabula in More, Hall and Swift. Per una definizione dell'utopia: Metodologie e discipline a confronto. Atti del Convengo Internazionale di Bagni di Lucca 12–14 settembre 1990. Ed. Nadia Minerva. Forme dell'Utopia 1. Ravenna: Longo, 1992. 81–88. [Geritz R095.]
  15. Radner, John B. The Fall and Decline: Gulliver's Travels and the Failure of Utopia. Utopian Studies 32:2 (1992): 51–74.
  16. Reilly, Edward J. Irony in Gulliver's Travels and Utopia. Utopian Studies 3:1 (1992): 70–83. [Geritz R338. On More's and Swift's use of irony in developing their protagonists and their ostensibly ideal societies.]
  17. Argent, Joseph Edward. No More Existence than the Inhabitants of Utopia: Utopian Satire in Gulliver's Travels. Diss. U of North Carolina-Greensboro, 1995. [Geritz I006.]
  18. Real, Hermann J. Reisen ins Nirgendwo: Mores Utopia und Swifts Gullivers Reisen. Staatstheoretische Diskurse im Spiegel der Nationalliteraturen. Ed. Barbara Bauer and Wulfgang G. Müller. Wolfenbütteler Forschungen, no. 79 (Wiesbaden: Harassowitz Verlag, 1998): 445–68. Translated as Voyages to Nowhere: More's Utopia and Swift's Gulliver's Travels. Eighteenth-Century Contexts: Historical Inquiries in Honor of Philip Harth. Ed. Howard B. Weinbrot, Peter J. Schakel, and Stephen E. Karlan. Madison: U of Madison P, 2001. 96–113.
  19. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. Reimagining the Aftermath of the Fall. Three Dystopian/Utopian Narratives in Jacobean England. [2002] See More, Bacon, Andreae and Campanella.
  20. Houston, Chlöe. Utopia, Dystopia, or Anti-Utopia? Gulliver's Travels and the Utopian Mode of Discourse. Utopian Studies 18:3 (2007): 425–42.

Utopia, Doni and Italy

  1. Cameron, Allan. Doni's Satirical Utopia. Renaissance Studies 10 (1996): 462–73. [Under More and Italy or Influence of Utopia?]
  2. Rivoletti, Christian. Le Metamorfosi dell'Utopia: Anton Francesco Doni e l'immaginario utopico di metà Cinquecento. Morgana: collana di studi e testi rinascimentali. Lucca: Maria Pacini Fazzi Editore, 2003.
    Review(s):
    1. Vittorio Gabrieli, Moreana 161 (2005): 133–35.
  3. Nelson, Eric. Utopia Through Italian Eyes: Thomas More and the Critics of Civic Humanism. [2006] See Utopia and Renaissance Humanism

More, Bartolomé de Las Casas and Vasco de Quiroga

  1. Zavala, Silvio. La Utopia de Tomás Moro en la Nueva España. La Utopia de Tomás Moro en la Nueva España y otros estudios. Con una Introducción por G. Estrada. Biblioteca Historica Mexicana de Obras Ineditas 4. Mexico: Antigua Librería Robredo, de J. Porrúa e Hijos, 1937. v–ix, 1–29. Rev. vers. rpt. in Memoria de El Colegio Nacional [Mexico] 4:4 (1949): 49–78. Rpt. in Recuerdo de Vasco de Quiroga. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 1965. 9–41 + 3 plates, 159–65. Rpt. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 1987. 9–34, 129–33. [Sum.: Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 10 (1966): 87–88; Geritz I129.]
  2. Fernández, Justino, and Edmundo O Gorman. Santo Tomás More y la utopía de Tomás Moro en la Nueva España. Mexico City: Alcancía, 1937. [Sullivan 1:349.]
  3. Zavala, Silvio. The American Utopia of the Sixteenth Century. Huntington Library Quarterly 10 (1947): 337–47. Rev. vers. as Sir Thomas More in New Spain: A Utopian Adventure of the Renaissance. Diamante 3. London: The Hispanic & Luso-Brazilian Councils, 1955. Rpt. in Recuerdo de Vasco de Quiroga. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 1965. 99–116. Rpt. (Sepan Cuantos 546) Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 1987. 81–93. Rpt. as Sir Thomas More in New Spain. in Essential Articles for the Study of Thomas More. Ed. Richard S. Sylvester and Germain Marc'hadour. Hamden, CT: Archon, 1977. 302–11, 631–32. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 10 (1966): 88; Geritz I127–128; Wentworth 429. On Vasco de Quiroga's Pueblo-Hospitals.]
  4. Zavala, Silvio. L'Utopie réalisée: Thomas More au Mexique. Annales, Economies. Sociétés. Civilisations. 3rd ser. (1948): 1–8. Rpt. in Recuerdo de Vasco de Quiroga. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 1965. 85–97 + 8 plates, 189–92 + 1 plate. Rpt. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 1987. 71–79, 153–55. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 10 (1966): 88.]
  5. Meany, John W. The Bishop of Utopia. American Catholic Historical Society 9 (1949): 197–212. [Geritz I076; Wentworth 424; Sullivan 2:315. On Vasco de Quiroga and Utopia.]
  6. Lietz, Paul S. More's Utopia in America. Catholic Lawyer 2 (1956): 340–49. [Geritz I058; Wentworth 423; Sullivan 2:232–33. On the influence of More's Utopia on Vasco de Quiroga.]
  7. Lacas, M. M. A Social Welfare Organizer in Sixteenth-Century New Spain: Don Vasco de Quiroga, First Bishop of Michoacán. Americas: A Quarterly Review of InterAmerican Cultural History 14 (1957): 57–86. [Geritz I057; Wentworth 422; Sullivan 2:206–207.]
  8. Warren, Fintan B. Vasco de Quiroga and his Pueblo-Hospitals of Santa Fe. Washington, DC: Academy of American Franciscan History, 1963. Span. trans. by Augustín Garcia Alcaraz as Vasco de Quiroga y sus pueblos hospitales de Santa Fe. Morelia, Mexico: Ediciones de la Universidad Michoacána, 1977, 1990. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 69 (1981): 40; Geritz I122; Wentworth 428.]
    Review(s):
    1. Mahmoud A. Manzalaoui, Moreana 3 (1964): 83–94.
  9. Zavala, Silvio. Recuerdo de Vasco de Quiroga. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 1965. Rev. ed. rpt. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 1987. [Reprints several articles on More's influence on Vasco de Quiroga. Some items also listed separately.]
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 10 (1966): 87–89.
    2. Charles Lemarié, Moreana 101/102 (1990): 195–96.
  10. Bataillon, Marcel. Don Vasco de Quiroga utopien. Moreana 15/16 (1967): 385–94.
  11. Mesnard, Pierre. Bartolomé de Las Casas (1474–1566) à travers son quatrième centenaire. Moreana 15/16 (1967): 401–30.
  12. Warren, Fintan B. Don Vasco de Quiroga utopien. Moreana 15/16 (1967): 385–94.
  13. Zavala, Silvio. Nouvelles études sur Vasco de Quiroga. Moreana 15/16 (1967): 380–84.
  14. Méchoulan, H. Pedro Malferit, un détracteur du Confesionario de Las Casas. Moreana 42 (1974): 5–15.
  15. Dealy, Ross. The Politics of an Erasmian Lawyer: Vasco de Quiroga. Malibu: Undena Publications, 1976.
  16. Marc'hadour, Germain. De Michoacán À Salamanque avec Silvio Zavala. Moreana 69 (1981): 118. Rpt. in Silvio Zavala, Recuerdo de Vasco de Quiroga. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 2nd ed. 1987. 267–69.
  17. Zavala, Silvio. Vasco de Quiroga, traducteur de l'Utopia. Moreana 69 (1981): 115–17. Rpt. in Recuerdo de Vasco de Quiroga. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 2nd ed. 1987. 261–65. [Geritz I130.]
  18. Beuchot, Maurizio. Promoción humana y Utopía en Don Vasco de Quiroga. Moreana 105 (1991): 43–54. [Sum.: Marie-Claude Rousseau, p.54; Geritz I012.]
  19. Baptiste, Victor N., ed. Bartolomé de Las Casas and Thomas More's Utopia: Connections and Similarities. A Translation and Study. Culver City, CA: Labyrinthos, 1990. [Sum Geritz R026. Baptiste argues that More's Utopia was inspired by Las Casas' Memorial de Remedios para las Indias (1516), of which he presents an edition and translation.]
    Review(s):
    1. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 237–40.
  20. Weyer, Bernhard. las Casas und die Utopien Neu Spaniens im 16. Jahrhunderts. Thomas Morus Jahrbuch 1992. 40–54.
  21. Green, Toby. Thomas More's Magician: A Novel Account of Utopia in Mexico. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2004. [A fictionalized account of the life of Vasco de Quiroga; includes notes and bibliography.]
    Review(s):
    1. Lynn Walford, Utopian Studies 16 (2005): 137–39.

See also Utopia, Spain, New Spain and America

Utopia, Spain, New Spain and America

  1. Jordan, Winthrop. Voyaging—New World as Utopia. In Search of the American Dream. San Diego: U of California P, 1974. Unit II, Art. 2, n.p. [Sullivan S2:75; Geritz R210.]
  2. Zavala, Silvio. Solórzano Pereira (1648) et l'Utopie de More. Moreana 47/48 (1975): 15–20. Rpt. in Recuerdo de Vasco de Quiroga. Mexico: Editorial Porrúa, 2nd ed. 1987. 205–210. [Sum.: G.M. p.20.]
  3. Slavin, Arthur J. The American Principle from More to Locke. First Images of America: The Impact of the New World on the Old. Ed. F. Chiappelli et al. 2 vols. Berkeley: U of California P, 1976. 1: 185–200. [Geritz R377; Wentworth 417.]
  4. Maravell, José Antonio. Utopia y reformismo en la España de los Austrias. Madrid: Siglo XXI de España Editores, 1982.
    Review(s):
    1. R. L. Kagan, Renaissance Quarterly 36 (1983): 631–32.
  5. Cro, Stelio. Realidad y utopía en el descubrimiento y conquista de la América Hispana (1492–1682). Troy, MI: International Book Pubs., 1983; Madrid: Fundación Universitaria Española, 1983. [Geritz I025.]
  6. Dooley, Patrick K. More's Utopia and the New World Utopias: Is the Good Life an Easy Life. Thought 60 (1985): 31–48. See also Theory in Utopia vs. Practice in Utopias—An Invitation to Thought. Moreana 87/88 (1988): 57–60. [Geritz R105 and R106; Wentworth 438. Comparison of More's Utopia and nineteenth-century American communitarian societies.]
  7. Zavala, Silvio. Noticias de Literatura Utopica en España e Hispanoamerica. Thesaurus 42 (1987): 362–69. [Geritz I126.]
  8. Zavala, Silvio. Aspects de la littérature utopique en Espagne et en Amérique latine. Translated from Spanish by Danièle Simon. Miscellanea Moreana: Essays for Germain Marc'hadour. Moreana 100: Volume XXVI Mélanges Marc'hadour. Ed. Clare M. Murphy, Henri Gibaud and Mario A. Di Cesare. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 61. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1989. 363–73. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 98/99 (1988): 161, 256. Translation of previous item?]
  9. López Estrada, Francisco. Las Utopías en el mundo hispánico. Moreana 105 (1991): 55–60. [Sum.: Marie-Claude Rousseau, p.60.]
  10. Fernández Delgado, Miguel Ángel. Influencia de la Utopía de Tomás Moro en el pensiamento colonizador Español. 1532–1647. Revista de Investigaciones Jurídicas [Mexico] 19 (1995): 455–51. ?Rpt. Europa: Wiege des Humanismus und der Reformation. 5 Internationales Symposion der Amici Thomas Mori 20. bis 27. Mai 1995 in Mainz. Dokumentation. Ed. Hermann Boventer and Uwe Baumann. Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 1997. 287–303. [On Francisco de Vitoria, Vasco da Quiroga, Francisco de Anuncibay and Juan de Solórzano Pereira.]
  11. López Estrada, Francisco. Publications Récentes Sur Thomas More et l'Utopie en Espagne et en Amérique Espagnole. [1996] See Reference Works: Bibliographies.

See also More, Bartolomé de Las Casas and Vasco de Quiroga and Utopia: Geography and Maps

Utopia in the 16th to 18th Centuries

  1. Kytzler, Bernhard. Neulateinische Utopien. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Turonensis: Proceedings of the Third International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies, Tours 6–10 September 1976. Ed. Jean-Claude Margolin. De Pétrarque à Descartes, 38. 2 vols. Paris: J. Vrin, 1980. 729–40. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 69 (1981): 106.]
  2. Kytzler, Bernhard. Zur neulateinischen Utopie. Utopieforschung: Interdisziplinäre Studien zur neuzeitlichen Utopie. [Utopia: Interdisciplinary Studies on modern Utopias] Ed. Wilhelm Voßkamp. 3 vols. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzler, 1982. 2: 197–209.
  3. Rose, Eliot. Too good to be true: Thomas Lupton's Golden Rule. Tudor Rule and Revolution: Essays for G. R. Elton from his American Friends. Ed. Delloyd J. Guth, and John W. McKenna. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1982. 183–200. [Geritz I092. On Lupton's Too Good to be True (1580–81) as the first English imitation of Utopia.]
  4. McCutcheon, Elizabeth. William Bullein's Dialogue Against the Fever Pestilence: A Sixteenth Century Anatomy. Miscellanea Moreana: Essays for Germain Marc'hadour. Moreana 100: Volume XXVI Mélanges Marc'hadour. Ed. Clare M. Murphy, Henri Gibaud and Mario A. Di Cesare. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 61. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1989. 341–59 + William Bullein's More and Frith. Moreana 101/102 (1990): 210–211. [Geritz R276.]
  5. Davies, J. C. Utopianism. The Cambridge History of Political Thought, 1450–1700. Ed. J. H. Burns, with the Assistance of Mark Goldie. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1991. 329–344.
  6. Borot, Luc. L'Angleterre et ses utopies de Thomas More à James Harrington. le nom et la métamorphose. Ed. S. Gély. Sens et Pouvoirs de la nomination dans les cultures hellénique et romaine 2. Montpellier: U. Paul Valéry, 1992. 227–54. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 118/119 (1994): 265.]
  7. Greiff, Ursula. Traces of Stoicism and Neo-Stoicism in Neo-Latin Utopias. Acta Conventus Neo-Latini Hafniensis. Proceedings of the Eighth International Congress of Neo-Latin Studies, Copenhagen, 12 August to 17 August 1991 Ed. R. Schnur et al. Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies 120. Binghamton, NY: Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies, 1994. 445–52. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/hafniactaconvent00inteuoft [Geritz R166.]
  8. Khanna, Lee Cullen. Utopia Exchanges: Negotiating Difference in Utopia. Gender and Utopia in the Eighteenth Century: Essays in English and French Utopian Writing. Ed. Nicole Pohl, and Brenda Tooley. Aldershot, Hampshire, UK: Ashgate, 2007. 17–38. [On More's Utopia (17–19) and 18th Century Women utopian writers, including Margaret Cavendish, Aphra Behn and Sarah Scott.]
  9. Mazour-Matusevitch, Yelena. Thomas More's Utopia, Gilbert Burnet, and Peter the Great. Moreana 51:197–198 (Dec. 2014): 211–230. [Sum.: pp.211–12.]

Utopia and Some Modern Utopian Novels

  1. Seeber, Hans Ulrich. Wandlungen der Form in der literarischen Utopie. Studien zur Entfaltung der utopischen Romans in England. Göppinger Akademische Beiträge 13. Göppingen: Kümmerle, 1970.
    Review(s):
    1. Heinz-Joachim Müllenbrock, Moreana 31/32 (1971): 87–89.
  2. Desroche, Henri. De Thomas More à Étienne Cabet. Moreana 31/32 (1971): 215–220. [Geritz I027. On More's influence on Cabet's Voyage en Icarie (1842).]
  3. Suvin, Darko. The Time Machine versus Utopia as a Structural Model for Science Fiction. Comparative Literature Studies 10 (1973): 334–52. [Geritz R410; Wentworth 459.]
  4. Gibaud, Henri. Thomas More en Icarie. Moreana 43/44 (1974): 71–80. [Sum.: I046. On references to More in Cabet's Voyage en Icarie.]
  5. Samaan, Angele B. More's Utopia and the Utopian Novel: The Popularity of the Genre. Moreana 58 (1978): 33–39.
  6. Seeber, Hans Ulrich. Thomas Morus' Utopia (1516) und Edward Bellamys Looking Backward (1888): Ein funktionsgeschichtlicher Vergleich. Utopieforschung: Interdisziplinäre Studien zur neuzeitlichen Utopie. [Utopia: Interdisciplinary Studies on modern Utopias] Ed. Wilhelm Voßkamp. 3 vols. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzler, 1982. 3: 357–77. [Geritz R369.]
  7. Sullivan, E. D. S. Place in No Place: Examples of the Ordered Society in Literature. The Utopian Vision: Seven Essays on the Quincentennial of Sir Thomas More. Ed. E. D. S. Sullivan. San Diego, CA: San Diego State UP, 1983. 29–49. [Geritz R393; Wentworth 458; Jacques Gury, Moreana 85 (1985): 65. On Utopia, Walden Two, Brave New World and Nineteen Eighty-Four.]
  8. Bourlès, Claude. La place de l'Utopie dans la littérature de Science Fiction. Moreana 83/84 (1984): 197–203. [Geritz R052.]
  9. Boventer, Hermann. Morality of Freedom and Concept of Responsibility—More and Orwell. Thomas Morus Jahrbuch 1984/85. 137–44.
  10. Samaan, Angele B. Death and the Death-Penalty in More's Utopia and Some Utopian Novels. [1986] See Suicide and Death.
  11. Hewitt, Janice L. More to Orwell: An Easy Leap from Utopia to Nineteen Eighty-Four. George Orwell. Eds. Courtney T. Wemyss, and Alexej Ugrinsky. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1987. 127–33. [Geritz I049.]
  12. Quattrocchi, Ed. Life Imititates Poetry: What Thomas More and George Orwell owe to Plato's Republic. [2009] See Utopia and Plato.

General Studies of Utopia

  1. Wells, H. G. About Sir Thomas More. An Englishman Looks at the World, Being a Series of Unrestrained Remarks upon Contemporary Matters. London: Cassell, 1914. 183–87. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/englishmanworld00welluoft Rpt. Echo Library, 2006. Also Published in Social Forces in England and America. New York: Harper, 1914. 214–18. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/socialforcesinen00welliala [Wentworth 646.]
  2. Berdan, John M. Early Tudor Poetry, 1485–1547. New York: Macmillan, 1920. 267–78, passim. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/earlytudorpoetry00berduoft [Wentworth 575; Sullivan 1:75.]
  3. Mumford, Lewis. How something happened to Utopia between Plato and Sir Thomas More; and how Utopia was discovered again, along with the New World. The Story of Utopias. Intro. Hendrik Willem van Loon. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1922. 58–78. Rpt. London: Harrap, 1923. Rpt. New York: The Viking Press, 1962. Online at http://www.sacred-texts.com/utopia/sou/sou06.htm [Wentworth 618; Sullivan 2:351–52.]
  4. Bogardus, Emory S. More and Utopian Social Thought. The History of Social Thought. Los Angeles: U of Southern California P, 1922. 155–72. ?Rev. vers. in The Development of Social Thought. London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1940, 1947. 179–95. 1922 online at https://archive.org/details/historyofsocial00boga. [Sullivan 1:108.]
  5. Hertzler, Joyce Oramel. The Utopia of Sir Thomas More. The History of Utopian Thought. New York: MacMillan, 1923. Rpt. New York: Cooper Square Publishers, 1965. 127–46. Online at https://archive.org/details/historyofutopian00hertuoft. [Geritz R187; Wentworth 601; Sullivan 2:103–104. More as a liberal social reformer.]
  6. Dermenghem, Émile. Thomas Morus et les Utopistes de la Renaissance. Paris: Plon, 1927. [Sullivan 1:264.]
  7. Ince, Richard. Nowhere Land: The Search for the Perfect Polity. Blackfriars 13:152 (Nov. 1932): 672–80. [Sullivan 2:155.]
  8. Barnes, Harry Elmer. and Howard Becker. Thomas More and the Details of his Utopia. Social Thought from Lore to Science. Vol. 1. A History and Interpretation of Man's Ideas About Life with his Fellows. Boston: Heath, 1938. 314–19. [Geritz R029; Wentworth 573.]
  9. Moorhead, F. J. An Introduction to the Utopia of St. Thomas More. London: Catholic Truth Society, 1938. 30pp. [Sullivan 2:333.]
  10. Ross, Harry. The Birth of Modern Utopianism: Sir Thomas More. Utopias Old and New. The University Extension Library. London: Nicholson and Watson, 1938. 54–63. Rpt. Folcroft, PA: Folcroft Library Editions, 1973. Rpt. Norwood, PA: Norwood Editions, 1978. [Geritz R342; Wentworth 627.]
  11. Dupont, V. La double Utopie de Thomas More. L'Utopie et le roman utopique dans la littérature anglaise. Paris-Toulouse: Didier, 1941. 84–123.
  12. Berneri, Marie Louise. Sir Thomas More: Utopia. Journey Through Utopia. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1950. Rpt. New York: Schocken, 1971. 58–88. [Geritz R038; Wentworth 577; Sullivan 1:76–77. Extensive quotations illustrating political and social life of Utopia.]
  13. Ruyer, Raymond. L'Utopie de Thomas Morus (1516). L'Utopie et les Utopistes. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1950. 160–64. Rpt. Brionne: G. Monfort, 1988. [Geritz R349.]
  14. Bronowski, Jacob, and Bruce Mazlish. Thomas More. The Western Intellectual Tradition: from Leonardo to Hegel. New York: Harper, 1960. 44–60. [Geritz R057; Wentworth 434.]
  15. Duveau, Georges. Le père de l'utopie, Thomas More. Sociologie de l'utopie et autres essais. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1961. 73–81.
  16. Daniel-Rops, Henri. Thomas More, Planiste de l'Utopie. Moreana 6 (1965): 5–8. [Geritz R080 and R341.]
  17. Frye, Northrop. Varieties of Literary Utopias. Daedalus 94 (1965): 323–47, esp. 333–36. Rpt. The Stubborn Structure: Essays on Criticism and Society. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1970. 109–34. Rpt. in part. in Sir Thomas More, Utopia: A New Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Ed Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 2nd ed. 1992. 205–211; Rpt. 3rd ed. 2011. 213–220. [Geritz R147 & R148.]
  18. Rexroth, Kenneth. Thomas More: Utopia. Classics Revisited. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1965. 154–59.
  19. Brugmans, Henri. Thomas Morus' Utopia . . . En Verder. [Thomas More's Utopia . . . and Further.] Moreana 15/16 (1967): 165–80. [Sum.: (Fr.) J. Jacques, pp. 179–80. A Dutch article.]
  20. Merlaud, André. L'Utopie: une bouteille à la mer. Moreana 15/16 (1967): 181–92.
  21. Quirós, Jorge Molina. La Novela Utopica Inglesa. Col. Vislumbres 9. Madrid: Editorial Prensa Española, 1967. 49–100. [A Study of More, Swift, Huxley and Orwell in Spanish.]
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 21 (1969): 98.
  22. Servier, Jean. Histoire de l'Utopie. Paris: Gallimard, 1967. [Geritz R370.]
  23. Wilson, John. Is Utopia Possible? English 20 (1971): 51–55. [Geritz R434.]
  24. Gentili, Augusto. La concezione utopistica dello stato tre Mediaevo Italiano e Rinascimento inglese. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies 2 (1972): 93–130. [Geritz R153. A Marxist analysis.]
  25. Chirpaz, Par François. Plaidoyer pour l'Utopie. Esprit 42:2 (1974): 567–74. [Geritz R070.]
  26. Giard, Luce. Voyageuse raison. Esprit 42:2 (1974): 557–66. [Geritz R154.]
  27. Priest, Harold M. More's Utopia & Utopian Literature. Lincoln, Nebraska: Cliffs Notes, Inc., 1975.
  28. Desroches, Rosny. L'Utopie, Evasion ou Anticipation? France and North America: Utopias and Utopians. Proceedings of the Third Symposium of French-American Studies, March 4–8, 1974. Ed. Mathe Allain. Lafayette, LA: U of Southwest Lousiana, 1978. 83–92. [Geritz R094.]
  29. Rimmer, Robert H. Alternate Lifestyles on the Road to Utopia. France and North America: Utopias and Utopians. Proceedings of the Third Symposium of French-American Studies, March 4–8, 1974. Ed. Mathe Allain. Lafayette, LA: U of Southwest Lousiana, 1978. 149–63. [Geritz R339.]
  30. Tod, Ian, and Michael Wheeler. The Renaissance City State: Utopia. Utopia. New York: Harmony Books, 1978. 29–34. [Geritz R414. An illustrated history of Utopias: contains an extremely superficial treatment of More's Utopia.]
  31. Manuel, Frank E., and Fritzie P. Manuel. The Passion of Thomas More. Utopian Thought in the Western World. Cambridge, MA: Belknap P for Harvard UP, 1979. 117–49, 822–25. [Geritz R245; Wentworth 615.]
    Review(s):
    1. J. A. G. Pocock, Renaissance Quarterly 34 (1981): 86–89.
  32. Rousseau, Marie-Claude. Utopies, 1516–1977: Couleurs du Temps et Jeux d'Espaces. Moreana 63/1 (1979): 87–94.
  33. Schulte Herbrüggen, Hubertus. Utopia and After. Moreana 62 (1979): 121–32. [Geritz R366; Wentworth 632. More's Utopia and the evolution of the genre of the Utopian novel.]
  34. Eliav-Feldon, Miriam. Realistic Utopias: The Ideal Imaginary Societies of the Renaissance, 1516–1630. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1982. 15–16. [Geritz R124; Wentworth 439. No section on Utopia. Very superficial analysis.]
    Review(s):
    1. J. Dunn, History 68 (1983): 316.
    2. Jacques Gury, Moreana 85 (1985): 65–66.
  35. Prévost, André. Retour en force de l'Utopie. Moreana 77 (1983): 43–47.
  36. Pardo, Isaac J. Fuegos bajo el agua: la invención de utopia [Fires under water: The Invention of Utopia]. Caracas, Venezuela: Fundación La Casa de Bello, 1983. Rpt. Caracas: Bibliotecha Ayacucho, 1990. [For a review, see Francisco Lópoz Estrada 1986 below.]
  37. Papazu, Monica. La Tentation utopique. Moreana 87/88 (1985): 157–66. [Geritz R313.]
  38. Kuon, Peter. Utopisher Entwurf und Fiktionale Vermittlung: Studien zum Gattungswandel de literarischen Utopie zwischen Humanismus und Frühaufklärung. Heidelberg: Carl Winter Universitätsverlag, 1986. 55–130. [A study of five Utopias by More, Campanella, Andreae, Gabriel de Foigny and Denis Veiras.]
    Review(s):
    1. André Prévost, Moreana 101/102 (1990): 183–87.
  39. Lópoz Estrada, Francisco. Fuegos bajo el agua, de Isaac J. Pardo: Un ensayo general sobre el pasado y el presente de la Utopia. Moreana 91/92 (1986): 103–110. [Sum.: p.199; Geritz R237. Book review of Pardo's Fuegos bajos el agua (Fires under water), see above.]
  40. Bonner, Laura. St. Thomas More: Utopia and the World Today. Moreana 98/99 (1988): 5–8.
  41. Olin, John C. The Idea of Utopia from Hesiod to John Paul II. Interpreting Thomas More's Utopia. Ed. John C. Olin. New York: Fordham UP, 1989. 77–98. [Geritz R309; Wentworth 621. A short history of utopian thought tracing its roots from Judaeo-Christian and classical sources.]
    Review(s):
    1. Clare M. Murphy, Sixteenth Century Journal 22 (1991): 884.
    2. Albert Rabil, Jr., Church History 61 (1992): 406.
    3. Dorothy F. Donnelly, Moreana 100 (1992): 60–62.
  42. Adams, Robert M. Paradise à la mode. Sir Thomas More, Utopia: A New Translation, Backgrounds, Criticism. Ed Robert M. Adams. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 2nd ed. 1992. 211–216. [Geritz R002.]
  43. Fortier, Mardelle L., and Robert Fortier. The Utopian Thought of St. Thomas More and its Development in Literature. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen P, 1992.
    Review(s):
    1. Peter V. Sampo, Utopian Studies 7:2 (1996): 261–63.
  44. Neville-Sington, Pamela, and David Sington. A Little Book. Paradise Dreamed: How Utopian Thinkers Have Changed the Modern World. London: Bloomsbury, 1993. 15–33, 268–70.
  45. Jean, Georges. Voyages en Utopie. Paris: Découvertes Gallimard, 1994. 36–46. [Sum.: Jacques Gury, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 102. An illustrated history of Utopian literature.]
  46. Standley, Fred Ever More: Utopian and Dystopian Visions of the Future 1890–1990. More's Utopia and the Utopian Inheritance. Ed. A. D. Cousins, and Damian Grace. Lanham, MY: University Press of America, 1995. 119–36. [Geritz I103.]
  47. Dubois, Claude-Gilbert. L'invention de société fictives: imaginaire de l'utopie au XVIe siècle. QWERTY [Pau, France] 8 (1998): 37–46.
  48. Hadfield, Andrew. The English Renaissance, 1500–1520. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 2001. 92–94, 231–235.
  49. Cooksey, Thomas L. Sir Thomas More, Utopia (1516). Masterpieces of Philosophical Literature. Westport, CT: Greenwood P, 2006. 71–92.
  50. Dexter, Gary. Utopia (1516). Why not Catch-21?: The Stories Behind the Titles. London: Frances Lincoln, 2007. 14–17.
  51. Waudby, June. Humanist Prose and Rhetoric: More, Philip Sidney, Wilson, and Puttenham. Renaissance Poetry and Prose. London: York P, 2010. 161–85, esp. 161–68, 178–82.

Marxism and Literary Theory

Socialist, Marxist and Literary Theoretical Interpretations

  1. Kautsky, Karl. Thomas Morus und seine Utopia, mit einer historischen Einleitung. Stuttgart: J. W. Dietz, 1888, 1913. Rpt. Offenbach a. M.: Bollwerk-Verlag Karl Drott, 1947. Dutch trans. by J. F. Ankersmit as Thomas More en zijne Utopie. Sociale bibliotheek 4. Rotterdam: H. A. Wakker, 1887?. Russian translation Moscow: Glavpolitprosvet, 1924, 1927. English trans. by H. J. Stenning as Thomas More and His Utopia, with a Historical Introduction. London: Black; New York: International Library, 1927. Rpt. with a Foreward by Russell Ames, New York: Russell & Russell, 1959. Rpt. London: Lawrence and Wishart, 1979. Rpt. Kessinger, 2003. [Geritz R212; SullivAN 2:182–84.]
    Review(s):
    1. TLS 9 June, 1927: 411 [Sullivan 2:183].
  2. Morris, William. Foreward. Thomas More's Utopia. Hammersmith, Kelmscott P, 1893. iii–viii. Online at http://www.marxists.org/archive/morris/works/1893/utopia.htm
  3. Guthrie, William B. The Beginning of Social Unrest in England, and The Social Theories of Sir Thomas More. Socialism Before the French Revolution. New York: Macmillan, 1907. 54–91, 92–131, passim. Online at http://www.archive.org/details/socialismbeforef00guthuoft [Wentworth 598; Sullivan 2:60–61.]
  4. Katowicz, Leon [Pseud. Stanisław Klonowicz.] Utopja Tomasza Morusa (1516–1916). Biblioteka Socjalistyczna (Warszawa), 1. Warszawa: Głos Robotniczy, 1917. Rpt. Warszawa : Wydaw. Stowarzyszenia Książka, 1919. Oline at http://rcin.org.pl/dlibra/docmetadata?id=33337. [Sullivan 2:198.]
  5. Beer, Max. Extinction of Mediaevalism. A History of British Socialism. With an Introduction by R. H. Tawney. Vol. 1. London: G. Bell, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1923, 1929. Rpt. London: London and Norwich Press, 1921. 29–47, esp. 32–44. Rpt. London: British Labour Press, 1921. Rev. ed. G. Allen & Unwin, rev 1940, 1948, Rpt. as 2 vols. 1953. 1:32–43. Rpt. Routledge, 2001. 1921 Online at http://www.archive.org/details/historyofbritish01beer [Wentworth 574.]
  6. Dietzel, Heinrich. Beiträge zur Geschichte des Sozialismus und Kommunismus. Plenge Staatswissenschaftliche Musterbücher, 2. Essen: G. D. Baedeker, 1920. 45–115. [Sullivan 1:275.]
  7. Beer, Max English Utopians. Social Struggles and Socialist Forerunners. Trans. H. J. Stenning. London: L. Parsons, 1924. 147–66. Rpt. New York: International Publishers, 1929. Rpt. in The General History of Socialism and Social Thought. 2 vols. New York: Russell & Russell, 1957. Vol. 2, Part I: Social Struggles and Socialist Forerunners. 147–66. 1929 Online at http://www.archive.org/details/socialstruggless00beeruoft [Geritz R032.]
  8. Morton, Arthur Leslie. The Island of the Saints. The English Utopia. London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1952. 35–59. Rpt. Berlin: Seven Seas, 1968; London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1969, 1987. 46–77. [Geritz R295; Wentworth 617.]
  9. Volgin, Vyacheslav. Sir Thomas More. News: A Review of World Events [Moscow] 39 (15 Feb. 1953): 14–15. Rpt. in More's Utopia And its Critics. Ed. Ligeia Gallagher. Chicago: Scott, Foresman and Company, 1964. 106–108. [Geritz R419.]
  10. Beer, Max. The General History of Socialism and Social Struggles. 2 vols. New York: Russell and Russlell, 1957. 2:147–80. [Sullivan S2:12.]
  11. Morton, Arthur Leslie. Utopia Yesterday and Today. The Matter of Britain: Essays in a Living Culture. London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1966. 59–72. Pp. 60–62 rpt. as A Present-Day Communist View of Utopia. Moreana 33 (1972): 31–32.
  12. Frąckowiak, Marian. Poglądy ekonomiczne Tomasza More. Prace Komisji Nauk Społecznych XI. Poznań: Poznańskie Towarzystwo Przyjacioł Nauk, 1967. [Geritz R140. An economic analysis of Utopia in Polish with an English summary.]
    Review(s):
    1. Artur Blaim, Moreana 50 (1976): 79–89.
  13. Greene, Thomas. The Flexibility of the Self in Renaissance Literature. The Disciplines of Criticism: Essays in Literary Theory, Interpretation, and History. New Haven: Yale UP, 1968. 241–64. [Geritz G038.]
  14. Bleich, David. More's Utopia: Confessional Modes. American Imago 28 (1971): 24–52. [Geritz R046; Wentworth 507; Sullivan S2:18. A Freudian interpretation.]
    Review(s):
    1. Germain Marc'hadour, Moreana 42 (1974): 97–98.
  15. Marin, Louis. Utopiques, Jeux d'espaces. Paris: Éditions de minuit, 1973. Trans. by R. A. Vollrath. Utopics: Spatial Play. Contemporary Studies in Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press; London: MacMillan, 1984. Chapter 9 trans. by Fredrik Jameson as Theses on Ideology and Utopia. Minnesota Review ns 6 (1976): 71–75. [Geritz R255; Wentworth 515. A deconstructionist reading of Utopia which ignores the Renaissance background of More's text.]
    Review(s):
    1. Henri Gibaud, Moreana 46 (1975): 13–20.
    2. See also review article by E. D. Hill 1982 below.
  16. Southall, Raymond. More's Utopia: The Case for a Palace Revolution. Literature and the Rise of Capitalism: Critical Essays Mainly on the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. London: Lawrence & Wishart, 1973. 11–20. [Geritz R381; Wentworth 637.]
  17. Reiss, Timothy J. Utopia and Process: Text and Anti-text. Substance 8 (1974): 101–25. [Geritz R335; Wentworth 626.]
  18. Erasmus, Charles J. Utopia: Millenial Man in Fiction. In Search of the Common Good: Utopian Experiments Past and Future. New York: Free Press, 1977. 197–231. [Geritz R128; Wentworth 440. On More, Plato, Cabet, Bellamy and Skinner as behaviorists.]
  19. Jameson, Fredrik. Of Islands and Trenches: Neutralization [Naturalization in title] and the Production of Utopian Discourse. Diacritics 7:2 (1977): 2–21. [Geritz R204; Wentworth 511. A Marxist analysis based on Marin's Utopiques.]
  20. Greenblatt, Stephen J. More, Role-Playing and Utopia. Yale Review ns 67 (1977/78): 517–36. Rev. vers. rpt. in Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1980. 11–39. [Geritz, R164.]
  21. Marin, Louis. Toward a Semiotic of Utopia: Political and Fictional Discourse in Thomas More's Utopia. Structure, Consciousness, and Society. Ed. R. H. Brown, and S. M. Lyman. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1978. 261–82. [Sum.: pp.261–62; Geritz R254; Wentworth 501. On the tension in More's Utopia between fictional discourse existing outside of time and political discourse existing within contemporary time—a Marxist critique.]
  22. Greenblatt, Stephen J. Filthy Rites. Deadalus 111 (1982): 1–16. Rpt. in Learning to Curse: Essays in Early Modern Culture. New York: Routledge, 1990; Pbk 1992. 59–79, esp. 70–76. [A Freudian reading.]
  23. Helgerson, Richard. Inventing Noplace, or the Power of Negative Thinking. [1982] See More, Rabelais and Montaigne.
  24. Hill, E. D. The Place of the Future: Louis Marin and his Utopiques. Science Fiction Studies 9 (1982): 167–79.
  25. Metscher, Thomas. The Irony of Thomas More: Reflections on the Literary and Ideological Status of Utopia. Shakespeare Jahrbuch [Weimar] 118 (1982): 120–30. [Geritz R281; Wentworth 481.]
  26. Reiss, Timothy J. From the Middle Ages to the W(H)ole of Utopia. The Discourses of Modernism. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1982. 108–39. [Geritz R334.]
  27. Kendrick, Christopher. More's Utopia and Uneven Development. Boundary 2 13 (1985): 233–66. [Geritz R213; Wentworth 512.]
  28. Marin, Louis. Voyages en Utopie. L'Ésprit Créateur 25 (Fall 1985): 42–51. [Geritz R256.]
  29. Peterman, Bernd. Thomas Morus—mißbrauchter Pater für sozialistische Utopien? Thomas Morus—Symbolfigur politischer Moral? Bensberger Protokolle 46. Bensberg: Thomas-Morus-Akademie Bensberg, 1986. 9–36. [Sum.: G.M. Moreana 110 (1992): 73.]
  30. Ruppert, Peter. More's Utopia: The Logic of Contradictions. Reader in a Strange Land: The Activity of Reading Literary Utopias. Athens, GA: U of Georgia P, 1986. 78–97, 173–74. [Geritz R348.
  31. Hutchinson, Steven. Mapping Utopias. Studies in Philology 85 (1987): 170–85. [Geritz R202. On the contrast between imaginary utopias and ideal eutopias.]
  32. Murphy, Clare M. Un aspect de différence dans l'Utopie de More: langue du livre I et parole du Livre II. Discours et utopie: stratégies, littérature, philosophie, architecture. Ed. M. Remy. Autremont Dire 3/4 (1986–87). Nancy: Presses Universitaires de Nancy, 1987. 123–33. [Sum.: André Prévost, Moreana 90 (1986): 69.]
  33. Prévost, André. Les structures de l'Utopie de Thomas More, instrument d'analyse du phénomène humain. Discours et utopie: stratégies, littérature, philosophie, architecture. Ed. M. Remy. Autremont Dire 3/4 (1986–87). Nancy: Presses Universitaires de Nancy, 1987. 135–48. [Sum.: André Prévost, Moreana 90 (1986): 69.]
  34. Dennis, Norman, and A. H. Halsey. A Practical Utopia: Thomas More (1478–1535). English Ethical Socialism: Thomas More to R. H. Tawney. Oxford: Clarendon P, 1988. 13–25. [Geritz R087.]
    Review(s):
    1. Rosemary Rendel, Moreana 103 (1990): 85–86.
  35. Schulte Herbrüggen, Hubertus. Thomas Morus' Utopia: grün-alternativ oder röt. Alternative Welten in Mittelalter und Renaissance. Ed. Ludwig Schrader. Studia humaniora 10. Düsseldorf: Droste Verlag, 1988. 259–76. [Sum.: p.15.]
  36. Boesky, Amy Diane. The Rhetoric of Reform: English Utopian Narrative, 1516–1667. Diss. Harvard U, 1989. [Geritz R048.]
  37. Freeman, John. A Model Territory: Enclosure in More's Utopia. [1989] See Utopia and Geography.
  38. Schwartz, Peter. Imagining Socialism: Karl Kautsky and Thomas More. International Journal of Comparative Sociology 30 (1989): 44–56 [Sum.: p.44; Geritz R367. On Kautsky's portrayal of More as a forerunner of modern socialism (and Hexter's portrayal of More as a proto-Enlightenment liberal.)]
  39. Halpern, Richard. Rational Kernel, Mystical Shell: Reification and Desire in Thomas More's Utopia. The Poetics of Primitive Accumulation: English Renaissance Culture and the Genealogy of Capital. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1991. 136–75, 293–99. [Geritz R178. A Marxist-Freudian interpretation: follows Marin's Utopiques.]
    Review(s):
    1. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1991): 241–46.
  40. Hutter, Michael. Literatur als Quelle wirtschaftlichen Wachtums. Internationales Archiv für Sozialgeschichte der Deutchen Literatur 16:2 (1991): 1–50. [MLA. On Literature as a source of economic growth in More's Utopia, Sebastian Brant, Daniel Defoe and Balzac.]
  41. Freeman, John. Discourse in More's Utopia: Alibi/Pretext/Postscript. English Literary History 59 (1992): 289–311. [Geritz R142. On the relationship between Books I and II.]
  42. Freeman, John. More's Place in No Place: The Self-Fashioning Transaction in Utopia. Texas Studies in Language and Literature 34 (1992): 197–217. [Geritz R146.]
  43. Still, Judith. Dreams of the End of Markets: The Model of Women's Work in Plato, More and Rousseau. Paragraph: The Journal of the Modern Critical Theory Group [Cambridge] 2 (1992): 248–60. [Geritz R389.]
  44. Marin, Louis. The Frontiers of Utopia. Utopias and the Millenium. Ed. K. Kumar and S. Bann. London: Reaktion Books, 1993. 7–16. ?Rev. vers. as? The Frontiers of Utopia: Past and Present. Critical Inquiry 19 (1993): 397–420.
  45. Knapp, Jeffrey. An Empire Nowhere: England, America, and Literature from Utopia to The Tempest. Studies in Cultural Poetics 16. Berkeley: U of California P, 1992. 7–8, 21–26, 28, 31, 34–36, 49–53. [Geritz R221. A new historicist reading.]
    Review(s):
    1. George M. Logan, Moreana 118/119 (1994): 252–53.
  46. Ludacer, Kenneth. The Heaven and Hell of More's Utopia. College English Association Critic 57 (1995): 66–73. [Geritz R240.]
  47. Bruce, Susan. Reason. Belief, and Mortality in Thomas More's Utopia. Philological Quarterly 75 (1996): 267–86. [Geritz R058.]
  48. Tricomi, Albert H. Foucault and Utopia: Politics and New Historicism. Reading Tudor-Stuart Texts Through Cultural Historicism. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1996. 25–44, 159–160. [Sum.: p.18.]
  49. Boesky, Amy. Founding the Best State of the Commonwealth: The School of Thomas More. Founding Fictions: Utopias in Early Modern England. Athens, GA: U of Georgia P, 1996. 23–55. [A revision of her thesis above.]
    Review(s):
    1. J.C. Davies, Utopian Studies 9:2 (1998): 237–38.
  50. Donskis, Leonidas. The End of Utopia? Soundings 79 (1996): 197–219. [Geritz R103.]
  51. Dujardin, Philippe. Régime de la loi, régime des images: le temple vide et l'île d'Utopie. Impressions d'îles. Ed. Françoise Létoublon. Toulouse: Presses Universitaires du Mirail, 1996. 231–45. [Geritz R117.]
  52. Vieira, Maria de Fátima. Os jogos de significados e o significado dos jogos em Utopia de Thomas More. Revista da Faculdade de Letras do Porto—Línguas e Literaturas 13 (1996): 51–64.
  53. Präuer, Andreas. Zwischen Schicksal und Chance. Arbeit und Arbeitsbegriff in Grossbritannien im 17. Und 18. Jahrhundert auf dem Hintergrund der Utopia des Thomas More. Schriften zur Wirtschafts- und Sozialgeschichte 52. Berlin: Duncker und Humblot, 1997. [Compares More's Utopia with Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations.]
    Review(s):
    1. Larry W. Caldwell, Utopian Studies 12:1 (2001): 229–31.
  54. Bony, Alain. Idéologie et narcissisme: la place de l'Utopie. QWERTY [Pau, France] 8 (1998): 27–35.
  55. Leslie, Marina. Renaissance Utopias and the Problem of History. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 1998. [On More, Bacon and Margaret Cavendish.]
  56. Herman, Peter C. Who's that in the Mirror?: Thomas More's Utopia and the Problematic of the New World. Opening the Borders: Inclusivity in Early Modern Studies. Essays in Honor of James V. Mirollo. Ed. Peter C. Herman. Newark, DE: U of Delaware P; London: Associate UP, 1999. 109–132. online at http://www.academia.edu/28822692
  57. Phillips, Joshua. Staking claims to Utopia: Thomas More, Fiction, and Intellectual Property. Material Culture and Cultural Materialisms in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Ed. Curtis Perry. Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, 2001. 111–138. Rev. vers. in Joshua Phillips Staking claims to Utopia: Thomas More, prose fiction, and the matter of belonging. English Fictions of Communal Identity, 1485–1603. London: Ashgate, 2010. 41–78. [Includes discussion of Robinson's translation (64–78).]
  58. Halpin, David. Utopianism and Education: The Legacy of Thomas More. British Journal for Educational Studies 49:3 (2001): 299–315.
  59. Wegner, Phillip E. Utopia and the Birth of Nations. Imaginary Communities: Utopia, the Nation, and the Spatial Histories of Modernity. Berkeley: U of California P, 2002. 27–61, 240–48.
    Review(s):
    1. Peter Ruppert, Utopian Studies 13:2 (2002): 241–43.
  60. Jameson, Fredric. Morus: The Generic Window. New Literary History 34 (2003): 431–51.
  61. Yoran, Hanan. More's Utopia and Erasmus' No-place. English Literary Renaissance 35 (2005): 3–30.
  62. Ghita, Lucian. I Would Rather Be Honest than Wise: Fictional Protocols and Authorial Credibility in Thomas More's Utopia. Prose Studies: History, Theory, Criticism 28:2 (2006): 113–29. [Includes discussion of Parerga.]
  63. Yates, Julian. 2007. Humanist Habitats, or, Eating Well with Thomas More's Utopia. Environment and Embodiment in Early Modern England. Edited by Mary Floyd-Wilson and Garrett Sullivan Jr. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. 187–209.
  64. Kamps, Ivo and Melissa Smith. Utopian Ecocriticism: Naturalizing Nature in Thomas More's Utopia. Early Modern Ecostudies: from Florentine Codex to Shakespeare. Edited by Thomas Hallock, Ivo Kamps, and Karen Raber. London: Macmillan, 2008. 115–130.
  65. Sweet, Timothy. Would Thomas More Have Wanted To Go to Mars? Colonial Promotion and Bio-Power. Early Modern Ecostudies: from Florentine Codex to Shakespeare. Edited by Thomas Hallock, Ivo Kamps, and Karen Raber. London: Macmillan, 2008. 269–90.
  66. Donahue, Micah. Utopia as Mirror and Desire. Appositions 2.2 (May 2009). http://appositions.blogspot.com/2009/05/micah-donohue-utopia-as-mirror-and.html
  67. Artese, Charlotte. The Subversion of Historiography in More's Utopia. Moreana 183/84 (2011): 205–23. [Sum.: pp.205–206. Includes discussion of Parerga.]
  68. Strier, Richard. Introduction. The Unrepentant Renaissance: From Petrarch to Shakespeare to Milton. Chicago: Chicago UP, 2011. 9–13.
  69. Miller, Shannon. Idleness, Humanist Industry and English Colonial Activity in Thomas More's fruitfull, pleasant, wittie and profitable Utopia. Essays in Memory of Richard Helgerson: Laureations. Edited by Roze Hentschell, and Kathy Lavezzo. Plymouth, UK: Rowman and Littlefield, 2012. 19–50.
  70. Bartolovich, Crystal. Utopia and Its New Enemies: Intellectuals, Elitism, and the Commonwealth of Learning. Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 13:3 (2013): 33–65. (DOI)
  71. Bruce, Susan. Utopian Justifications: More's Utopia, Settler Colonialism, and Contemporary Ecocritical Concerns. College Literature 42:1 (2015): 23–43.

See also Utopia: Socialist and Marxist Interpretations

Unclassified Articles and Dissertations

Unclassified Unpublished Dissertations

  1. Nichol, J. The Idea of the Natural Man in More's Utopia. M.A. Diss. U of Toronto, 1951. [Directed by Arthur E. Barker.]
  2. Meerse, Peggy Currey. The Ideal of Order and the Process of Experience in More's Utopia. Diss. U of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1972. [Geritz R280.]
  3. Sulfridge, Cythia Waugh. Intimate Narrative: Narrator-Reader Relationship in Three Renaissance Precursors of Tristram Shandy. Diss. Johns Hopkins U, 1978. [Geritz R392.]
  4. Wilson, Norman Batcham. Four Paradigms of Utopian Fiction: The Exemplar of Atomism. Diss. U of Michigan, 1980. [Geritz R438.]
  5. Boyle, Anthony James. The Epistemological Evolution of Renaissance Utopian Literature, 1516–1657. Diss. New York U, 1983. [Geritz R053.]
  6. Francis, Kevin. Democracy, Citizenship and Utopia. Diss. U of Glasgow, 1988. [Geritz R141.]
  7. Carlson, Cindy Laurel. Imagining Justice in Late Medieval and Tudor Literature. Diss. Columbia U, 1989. [Geritz R063.]
  8. Spradley, Dana Lloyd. Rewriting the Respublica: The Politics of Literary Figuration in More's Utopia, Shakespeare's Pericles, and Milton's Areopagitica. Diss. Yale U, 1989. [Geritz R383.]
  9. Morgan, Nicole S. Negotium, otium et specula: l'Utopie de Thomas More ou la découverte d'un nouveau continent Épistémologique. Diss. U of Ottawa, 1993. [Geritz R292.]
  10. Freeman, John. Island of Improvement: More's Utopian Enclosure. Diss. Wayne State U, 1995. [Geritz R143.]
  11. Glaze, Walter Stephen. Patronage and Otium in Two Renaissance Dialogues: A Comparative Approach. Diss. Emory U, 1995. [Geritz R156. A Comparison of Conversino and More.]
  12. Machado de Araújo. Joachim Educação e Utopia. Para uma reinterpretação de Tomás Moro. Diss. Braga: Universidade de Minho. 2001.

Unclassified Articles and Books in German

  1. Sternberg, Kurt. Über die Utopia des Thomas Morus. Archiv für Rechts- und Wirtschaftsphilosophie 26 and 27 (1932–33 and 1933–34): 464–97 bzw. 232–257. [From Wenzel's Bibliography.]
  2. Möbus, Gerhard. Politik und Menschlichkeit im Leben des Thomas Morus. Mainz: Hase und Köhler, 1966. [From Wenzel's Bibliography.]
  3. Padberg, Rudolf. Der Sinn der Utopie des Thomas Morus: Fragen der politischen Verantwortung des Christen am Vorabend der Reformation. Theologie und Glaube 57 (1967): 28–47.
  4. Wartburg, W. Von. Die Utopia des Thomas Morus versuch einer Deutung. Discordia Concors: Festgabe für Edgar Bonjour zu seinem siebzigsten Geburtstag an 21. August 1968. 2 vols. Basel and Stuttgart: Helbing & Lichtenhahn, 1968. 1: 63–106.
  5. Koppenfels, Werner von. Thomas Morus und die humanistische Utopie der Renaissance. Alternative Welten. Ed. Manfred Pfister. Münchener Universitäts-Schriften: Philosophische. Text und Untersuchungen zur Englischen Philologie 12. Munich: Wilhelm Fink Verlag, 1982. 96–113. [Geritz R222.]
  6. Seeber, Hans Ulrich, and Walter Bachem. Aspekte und Probleme der neueren Utopiediskussion in der Anglistik. Utopieforschung: Interdisziplinäre Studien zur neuzeitlichen Utopie. [Utopia: Interdisciplinary Studies on modern Utopias] Ed. Wilhelm Voßkamp. 3 vols. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzler, 1982. 1: 143–91.
  7. Voßkamp, Wilhelm. Thomas Morus' Utopia: Zur Konstituierung eines gattungsgeschichtlichen Prototyps. Utopieforschung: Interdisziplinäre Studien zur neuzeitlichen Utopie. [Utopia: Interdisciplinary Studies on modern Utopias] Ed. Wilhelm Voßkamp. 3 vols. Stuttgart: J. B. Metzler, 1982. 2: 183–96.
  8. Erzgräber, Willi. Thomas Morus: Utopia (1516). Literarische Utopien von Morus bis zur Gegenwart. Ed. Klaus L. Berghahn, and Hans Ulrich Seeber. Königstein im Taunus: Athenäum Verlag, 1983. 25–43. [Geritz R129.]
  9. Lange, Bernd-Peter. Thomas Morus: Utopia (1516). Die Utopie in der Angloamerikanischen Literatur: Interpretationen. Ed. Hartmut Heuermann and Bernd-Peter Lange. Düsseldorf: Bagel, 1984. 11–31. [Geritz R226.]
  10. Lederer, Dietrich. Thomas Morus' Utopia: Weltbild, Menschenbild, und Literatur. Weimarer Beiträge: Zeitschrift für Literaturwissenschaft, Ästhetik und Kulturtheorie 31.1 (1985): 1150–60. [Geritz R229.]
  11. Philadelphus. The opinion of Sir Thomas More, Lord High Chancellor of England, concerning inclosures: in answer to a letter from Galloway. ` Edinburgh : [s.n.], Printed in the year 1724. [ESTC T180731. Check also "Philonomus" 1751 and 1752.]