Simple Primary Math, or Arithmetic

Most recently I have added a HELP section where I offer adults
very basic help in understanding important learning
 young children must master.

(I am still learning myself, and trying to improve this site.)


             CLICK on any below to start using the main parts of this website:
S I T E

C H O I C E S
 *CENTER*
Will take you to most of the many places on this website and speed up return visits for those copying material.
CONTENTS
of booklets
All four free booklets: A short description of, and link to, the contents of
Gordon's GamesSimple MathNot So Simple Math,  and Not Just Math.    
**HELP** : These .pdf files offer a simple understanding of
many key concepts needed
to teach math or arithmetic to young children (or even adults).
PDF  FILES:
FREE  FOR DOWNLOADING.  ALL THE BOOKLETS, PLUS EXAMPLES, WORKSHEETS AND CHARTS TO GO WITH THEM.  AS WELL AS THE MANY SECTIONS UNDER HELP, PLUS MORE.
TERMS: new PDF FILES ARE FREE TO COPY AND PRINT. 
  SEE HERE FOR COPYING AND GIVING PRINTED COPIES TO OTHERS.
MATH SITES: many links to other good sites, and pages of links, plus a
NEW page of useful links to sites that might help you.
NEW: more games and activities; using playing cards with the games.
COPYING BOOKLETS:
How to copy from this site.



"Children like to think in terms of what they know. Most know and love games.
 I believe I did best when I taught math as a game-like subject.
 In many respects it is just like a game. There are definitions to learn and rules to follow.
How well you do depends on knowing definitions, rules, and the many facts that make one quicker at the game.
Like many games, speed is important, but second to accuracy."



This website is aimed at adults who are planning to teach young children,
or to just learn what they may have missed in their own school days


Teachers of regular classes,
special classes and
parents homeschooling their children have all used the ideas found here.

As well, teachers in universities and colleges have used this site with their education students.

What is here is meant to assist anyone involved in teaching ages 5 to 8 in school classrooms or at home.
These ideas can also be used for younger and older children where it suits them.


 

    My teaching may be different from what you are used to.  But it’s not new. 
There’s nothing new in Arithmetic or Math.
 
I have just tried to keep it simple, and to use patterns that will relate
to what is coming later.
    I’ve tried to use words that would already be part of a young child’s vocabulary. 
Words like “whole” and “part” are used in a new but similar way.  Some other words are needed, and may be known.

“Equal” is an idea children who have to share know about, even if they don’t use that word.
    For instance, if you have 5 cookies, 5 is the whole bunch of cookies.  If you give one of two children 2 cookies, you’d better not give the other any other part but 2.  Children know what is fair.  Equal amounts is fair.
 Eat the part that’s left yourself.  That’s okay!
 

    I have avoided words like “difference”  because it is very confusing for a young child.
 I have avoided words like “subtrahend” because, well, who cares.
It's just the “part” you are taking away from the “whole”. 
Asking which number is “bigger” can get some interesting results.

   
We talk in word sentences to tell others what has happened.   5-2-2-1=0 describes the cookie example above.  
The cookie story is told in it’s simplest form with a “number sentence”.
 

I spend a lot of time with the simplest number sentences, and the way they are usually formed.
    5-2=3 is soon learned as “whole” (5) take away one “part” (2) leaves (equals) another part (3).
We learn that this can go backwards, from the parts to the whole, 3+2=5.
This leads to patterns, something that works forever:  whole - part = part, and part + part = whole.

    Later there’s multiplying and dividing.  This work can only be done with equal parts. 
All the parts have to be the same number, but we have a new job for a number. 

It acts like a part, but it only counts the number of parts. 
We have 3x2=6 and 6-:-2=3.  3 equal groups of 2 equals 6.  6 made into groups of 2 make 3 equal groups.
(If you had 6 cookies, everybody could have had a fair share, or…)

    Eventually you could say that if “d” is some number, what will “d” be in this sentence:  2+d=6? 
You could also put 6=d+2.  The pattern holds.  Later it leads to 6-d=e and a+b=c.  From there it leads to algebra, calculus,

and E= mc2 (that 2 should be up.)

The author started teaching in 1960, taught grades 4-7 (ages 9-12) for six years, changed to K-3 (ages 5-8),
about 1967, taught 7 years in Kindergarten, remainder in Grades 1-3, retired in 1995
and started what you see here for a hobby. He has a B.Ed.(Elem), and M.Ed. (Early Childhood Education).



If you have any questions, suggestions, or comments,
address an  email to   @telus.net   with   m.games    before it.
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NEW MAILING ADDRESS AS OF NOV. 15, 2000 : 15057 27A Ave., Surrey, B.C., Canada, V4P 1P1

since 2/05
(page revised 6/04, 1/05, 3/05,12/05, 7/06, 1/07 9/07, 11/07, 1/08, 3/08, 10/08, 3/09, 9/09, 5/10, 11/10, 5/14)