Sengai Ekido
born: 1805
died:
1879

place:
 Japan
Zen master:  Fugai Honko
Zen disciples:
 Daikyu Goyu, ...
stories:

Osho
Nirvana: The Last Nightmare, ch. 5
Sato-Kaiseki was very much disturbed by the
implications of Copernicus' heliocentric theory,
which, of course, was inconsistent with the old
Buddhist cosmology in which Mount Sumeru
occupies the center of the universe. He reasoned
that if the Buddhist view of the cosmos were
proved false, the triple world, and the twenty-five
forms of existence would be reduced to nonsense
– resulting in the negation of Buddhism itself. So
he immediately set about writing a book in
defense of the Mount Sumeru position, sparing
himself no effort.

When he had finished the work he took it at once
to
Master Ekido and presented it triumphantly.

After leafing through the first few pages the
master thrust it back, shaking his head and
saying: "How stupid! Don't you realize that the aim
of Buddhism is to shatter the triple world and the
twenty-five forms of existence? Why stick to such
utterly worthless things and treasure Mount
Sumeru? Blockhead!"

Dumbfounded, Kaiseki shoved the book under his
arm and quickly went home.


This is the taste of an enlightened being...the
flavor.

One has to get rid of all doctrines, scriptures,
theories, because basically one has to get rid of
one's own ego. One has to get rid of all religions
to be really religious. One has to get rid of all
theories to come face to face with truth.

Zen monks are rare in the whole history of
religion. They have burned their own scriptures.
They have burned Buddha statues because the
night was cold and there was no other wood
available in the temple. Rare people...

                                             --Osho
                 Nirvana: The Last Nightmare, ch. 5
          oshobob  The Living Workshop                                            
                                                    Zen Masters
Ekido served as chief abbot of Daihonzan Soji
Temple in Japan.
Chin.: Zhanyai Yitang