Jap., Ho Koji  (alt.,Koshi)
born:  740
died:  808

place:  China
Chan master:  none formally, Pang was a
layman, who had contact with
Mazu, Shitou, and
Yaoshan.
Chan disciples:
aka: Pang Daoxuan (his original name), Pang
Yun
(J. Ho'un). "Jushi" in Chinese denotes a lay
Buddhist scholar/student.

Layman Pang lived a householder life outside
of monasteries and temples.  His daughter was
also a lay Chan adept. He became enlightened
and is listed as a Zen master.
stories:  
Transmission of the Lamp, Case 165

Osho
No Mind: The Flowers of Eternity, ch. 12

Ma Tzu: The Empty Mirror, ch. 10

Returning to the Source: talks on Zen, ch. 7

The Great Zen Master Ta Hui, ch. 24, ch. 33
Pang Jushi
Pang (surname)  Layman
       oshobob  The Living Workshop                                        
                                                    Zen Masters
When he first met Sekito, Ho Koji asked, “Who is
he that is independent of all things?”

Before he could finish his question, Sekito
covered Koji’s mouth with his hand. At this, Koji
underwent an experience and expressed himself
in the following verse:

    Daily, nothing particular,
    Only nodding to myself.
    Nothing to choose, nothing to discard.
    No coming, no going,
    No person in purple.
    Blue mountains without a speck of dust.
    I exercise occult and subtle power,
    Carrying water, shouldering firewood.


Later, when he came to visit Ma Tzu, Koji again
asked, “Who is he that is independent of all
things?”

Ma Tzu said, “When you have drunk all the water
in the Yangtze River, I will tell you.”

At this, Koji underwent another great experience
and composed a second verse:

    The ten directions converging,
    Each learning to do nothing,
    This is the hall of Buddha’s training;
    Mind is empty, all is finished.

Zen has a way of saying things which nobody else
in the world has used. Rather than saying, “You
are asking me an impossible question,” Ma Tzu
says for him first to do something impossible –
“Then come and ask me. If you can manage to
drink all the water of the Yangtze River, I will
manage the experience to be translated into
words...”

                                            --Osho
     No Mind: The Flowers of Eternity, ch. 12