Sengcan
Jap.  Sosan
Buddhist monk      Gem
born:  c. 530
died:  606

place:  China
Chan master:  Huike (J., Eka)
Chan disciples:  Daoxin (J., Doshin)
Sengcan is considered the 3rd Chinese Ancestor
of Chan.  The "book"
Verses on the Faith-Mind (Xin
Xin Ming)
is attributed to him. It is a small series of
poem verses that has been translated into English
in the 20th century.

posthumous name: Jianzhi (Mirror Wisdom)

stories:

Verses of the Faith-Mind, by Sengcan
(original in Chinese)

Osho:
Hsin Hsin Ming: The Book of Nothing
(entire book uses Sengcan's verses)
          oshobob  The Living Workshop                                           
                                                       Zen Masters
Says Sosan:

    The great way is not difficult
    for those who have no preferences.
    When love and hate are both absent
    everything becomes clear and
    undisguised.
    Make the smallest distinction, however,
    and heaven and earth are set infinitely
    apart.
    If you wish to see the truth then hold no
    opinion for or against.
    The struggle of what one likes and what
    one dislikes is the disease of the mind.


Just like Chuang Tzu: “Easy is right.” The great
way is not difficult.If it appears difficult, it is you
who make it difficult. The great way is easy.

How can it be difficult? Even trees follow it,
rivers follow it, rocks follow it. How can it be
difficult? Even birds fly in it and fish swim in it.
How can it be difficult? Man makes it difficult,
mind makes it difficult – and the trick to make
any easy thing difficult is to choose, to make a
distinction...

                                     --Osho
Hsin Hsin Ming: The Book of Nothing, ch. 1
[When Osho speaks on a master or a book, he goes totally into it, becomes the master, the master speaks freshly through him and becomes the highest expression of spirituality ever until the next series. Thus, in the introduction to the Sufi series Unio Mystica, his high praise of Sosan's masterwork really stands out. He says:

If I were to save only two books from the whole world of the mystics, then these would be the two books. One would be from the world of Zen, the path of awareness: Sosan's Hsin Hsin Ming. I have spoken on it; it contains the quintessence of Zen, of the path of awareness and meditation. The other book would be Hakim Sanai's Hadiqat Al Haqiqa: The Walled Garden of Truth -- in short, The Hadiqa: The Garden. This is the book we are entering today.

The Hadiqa is the essential fragrance of the path of love. Just as Sosan has been able to catch the very soul of Zen, Hakim Sanai has been able to catch the very soul of Sufism. Such books are not written, they are born. Nobody can compose them. They are not manufactured in the mind, by the mind; they come from the beyond. They are a gift. They are born as mysteriously as a child is born, or a bird or a rose flower. They come to us, they are gifts..]