Zhaozhou Congshen
Jap.  Joshu Jushin
born:  778
died:  897    120 years

place:  China
Chan master:   Nanquan (J. Nansen), Huangbo (J.
Obaku)
Chan disciples:  Guangxiao (J., Koko), Yanyang (J.,
Genyo), ...
Zhaozhou is considered one of most important
figures in Zen history.  Coming off of the Mazu lineage,
he is cited in many famous Zen stories in its literature.  
He is fairly unusual in the fact that he did not become
enlightened until he was 80 years old, guiding
disciples for the next 40 years until his death at the
age of 120.  His location of Zhaozhou is in northern
China, in modern Hebei Province, just south of Beijing.
 In his time the monastery was called
Guanyin Yuan,
and had a name change in the Yuan Dynasty
(Mongolian rule) to
Bailin Si (Cypress Grove Temple),
which is the name it retains to this day.
Zhaozhou (city name)    Start Awareness
stories:

Biyan Lu (Blue Cliff Record), Case 2

Wumenguan (Gateless Gate)

Jingde Chuandeng Lu
(Transmission of the Lamp)

Osho
Joshu: The Lion's Roar (entire book uses
stories of Zhaozhou)

Live Zen, ch. 2, ch. 13

This, This, A Thousand Times This: The Very
Essence of Zen, ch. 11, ch. 12

Zen: The Solitary Bird, Cuckoo of the Forest,
ch. 8, ch. 11, ch. 12, ch. 14

Zen: The Diamond Thunderbolt, ch. 2, ch. 4

Nansen: The Point of Departure, ch. 6, ch. 10

No Mind: The Flowers of Eternity, ch. 7, ch. 11

A Bird on the Wing, ch. 4

Returning to the Source: talks on Zen, ch. 2

The Great Zen Master Ta Hui, ch. 13, ch 18,  
ch. 25

Dang Dang Doko Dang, ch. 6

A Sudden Clash of Thunder, ch. 1

Ah, This, ch. 3
surname:  Hao
posthumous name:  Zhenji Dashi
Note:
There are number of different Zen masters with the
Japanese romanization name of "Joshu", though each
one uses different characters, and is usually the name
of a city in China. These other names are not, to add
to the confusion, pronounced "Zhaozhou" in
Chinese(e.g.,
Dingzhou, Jingzhong, Ruzhou,
Shuzhou
, etc.)
aka:  Chao Chou  (old Wade-Giles romanization)
     oshobob  The Living Workshop                                           
                                              Zen Masters
ON FIRST ENTERING NANSEN'S MONASTERY,
JOSHU WAS MADE TO SERVE IN THE KITCHEN AS
THE STOKER. ONE DAY HE CLOSED ALL THE
DOORS AND PILED WOOD ON THE FIRE UNTIL THE
WHOLE KITCHEN WAS FILLED WITH SMOKE. THEN
HE SHOUTED, "FIRE! FIRE! COME TO MY RESCUE!"
WHEN THE WHOLE COMMUNITY HAD FLOCKED TO
THE DOOR, HE SAID, "I WILL NOT OPEN THE DOOR
UNLESS YOU CAN SAY THE RIGHT WORD." NO
ANSWER CAME FROM THE CROWD. BUT NANSEN
SILENTLY PASSED THE KEY THROUGH A WINDOW
HOLE. THIS WAS THE RIGHT WORD THAT JOSHU
HAD IN MIND, AND HE OPENED THE DOOR
IMMEDIATELY.

Joshu is a very rare case. Joshu had become a priest
when he was still a child and experienced his first
satori when he was seventeen. He said of this
experience: "Suddenly, I was ruined and homeless."

This statement, after having the first glimpse of
enlightenment, is of tremendous significance. He says,
"Suddenly I was ruined. Whatever I was before, is all
ruined. I was not that. I had cultivated a personality, a
mind, a heart  –  nothing of that was me. The satori
left me suddenly ruined and homeless. The home that
I had made for myself according to the rules of the
society, amongst the crowd, a cozy place...
enlightenment, just the first glimpse of it, has taken
away all...

                                        --Osho
                            Joshu: The Lion's Roar, ch. 2
Chinese simplified:  赵州从谂
The city of Zhaozhou (now called Zhaoxian) is in Hebei Province,
China--see the green asterisk below on the map.
Bailin Si, Zen
master Zhaozhou's temple, is still in existence, and is open
for visitation.
*
The pagoda at Zhaozhou's temple, built in 1330,
hundreds of years after the famous Zen master
lived and taught here: