Osho Commentary on Kyozan
aka Kyozan Ejaku, Yangshan Huiji, Yang-shan Hui-chi, 
807-883, disciple of Isan Reiyu

NB: parts in ALL CAPS are from Osho's "source material"

ONCE, WHEN HE WAS STILL WITH HIS MASTER, KYOZAN SAID TO ISAN, "WHERE DOES THE REAL BUDDHA DWELL?"

ISAN REPLIED, "BY MEANS OF THE SUBTLETY OF THOUGHTLESS THOUGHT, CONTEMPLATE THE BOUNDLESS SPIRITUAL BRIGHTNESS. CONTEMPLATE IT UNTIL RETURNING TO THE GROUND OF BEING, THE ALWAYS ABIDING NATURE, AND ITS FORM OF THE UNDICHOTOMOUS PRINCIPLE. THIS IS THE REAL BUDDHA."

ON HEARING THIS, KYOZAN WAS ENLIGHTENED.

LATER, WHEN KYOZAN HAD BECOME A MASTER HIMSELF, ISAN SENT HIM A MIRROR AS A GIFT. WHEN HE WENT TO THE HALL WHERE HIS MONKS WERE ASSEMBLED, KYOZAN HELD UP THE MIRROR AND SAID TO THE ASSEMBLY, "PLEASE SAY WHETHER THIS IS ISAN'S MIRROR OR KYOZAN'S MIRROR. IF SOMEONE CAN GIVE A CORRECT REPLY, I WILL NOT SMASH IT."

NO ONE ANSWERED, AND KYOZAN SMASHED THE MIRROR.

Maneesha, a new series of talks begins today.

These are not sermons in a church; these are communions. A discourse, a sermon, remains within the limits of the mind. Only a communion can raise you beyond the mind, and that which is beyond the mind is Zen. A new series of communions is a great event. We will be looking into the very heart of Kyozan.

Kyozan was a very simple man not the philosophic kind, not a poet, nor a sculptor. Nothing can be said about him except that he was absolutely authentic, honest. If he does not know a thing he will say so, even at the risk of people thinking that he has fallen from his enlightenment. But this makes him a unique master.

Zen is full of unique masters, but Kyozan's uniqueness is his simplicity. He is just like a child. It took Isan, his master, forty years of hard work to make Kyozan enlightened. He was determined, and he said he would not leave the body until Kyozan became enlightened though he was old enough.

Kyozan did everything that Isan said, but nothing penetrated to his very being. He was a very ordinary man. Heaven and hell, God and the beyond had never worried him. He was not a seeker in the sense every seeker is -- a seeker of truth.

No, he was not seeking truth, because he is reported to have said that, "If you are seeking the truth you have certainly accepted that truth exists, and I will not accept anything on belief. So I am just seeking, searching in all directions, trying to come in tune with the universe. It may be just my fallacy, my fantasy, but I want to go without any prejudice."

Even the prejudice may prove right, but when a prejudice proves right, you will never know the truth. You will go on projecting your prejudice. And you can create a whole paraphernalia of prejudices, a system of beliefs -- rational, logical, appealing, presentable but if belief is the base stone on which you are creating the whole palace, you are working unnecessarily hard.

Nobody can come to know the truth by any preconceived idea. His preconceived idea will give a certain shape, a certain color to the experience. The experience will not be pure. It will be as polluted as Poona's air!
But Isan, it seems, took it as a challenge: if an ordinary man like Kyozan cannot be transformed into a buddha, how can you allow others to trust in the existence of the buddha?

All the religions have done just the contrary. Krishna is God's incarnation, so is Rama, so is Parasurama. They have made them sit on such a high pedestal that you can only worship, you can only pray; you cannot conceive that you yourself can also experience what these people on the heights are experiencing.

And the creation of hierarchies makes it difficult for almost anyone to be unprejudiced. When the child is born, we have good intentions, but good intentions do not mean that they are going to lead you to the truth. Everybody is burdened with good intentions -- with Shrimad Bhagavadgita, with the Holy Koran, with the Holy Bible. Continuously repeating anything, slowly slowly it becomes a truth to you. And for centuries these religions have been repeating.

Isan chose Kyozan to be his successor. It took forty years of tremendous work on him, because he was a simple man, and in the first place he was not in search of truth. Just think of some man who is not in search of truth, and you go on knocking on his door every day.

[...]

Choosing Kyozan as his successor, and waiting for forty years what patience! almost transforming a stone into a diamond. But Isan was determined to make one point absolutely clear to humanity: if Kyozan, a simple and ordinary person, not belonging to any speciality, any category, without any talent, any genius if he can become enlightened, it will be a proof. To give this proof to humanity he chose Kyozan and worked hard on him. And the day Kyozan became enlightened, the day Isan transferred his enlightenment and the two flames became one, Isan disappeared from the world of matter, body, mind.

Kyozan was so radiant now. He was not only once enlightened, he was twice enlightened. His master has given him richer experiences, far deeper spaces, far clearer skies.

[...]

LATER, WHEN KYOZAN HAD BECOME A MASTER HIMSELF, ISAN SENT HIM A MIRROR AS A GIFT. WHEN HE WENT TO THE HALL WHERE HIS MONKS WERE ASSEMBLED, KYOZAN HELD UP THE MIRROR AND SAID TO THE ASSEMBLY, "PLEASE SAY WHETHER THIS IS ISAN'S MIRROR OR KYOZAN'S MIRROR. IF SOMEONE CAN GIVE A CORRECT REPLY, I WILL NOT SMASH IT."

This is how in Zen very subtle and intricate matters become immensely important. To the outsider it will look a stupid question.

In the first place, you should remember that sending a mirror as a gift -- he is opening a new monastery, he will be the master sending the mirror to him is to remind him: "Don't forget. This mirror will remind you that whatever the mirror reflects is not you. But whoever witnesses the reflection in the mirror, that is your buddhahood."

Kyozan rose to these heights. He said to the assembly of monks:

PLEASE SAY WHETHER THIS IS ISAN'S MIRROR OR KYOZAN'S MIRROR. IF SOMEONE CAN GIVE A CORRECT REPLY, I WILL NOT SMASH IT."

NO ONE ANSWERED, AND KYOZAN SMASHED THE MIRROR.

To answer the question a man of enlightenment was needed. Spontaneously he would have responded thousands of ways are open but remaining silent, dumb, simply shows your ignorance, your unawareness. And Kyozan's smashing the mirror is just to make a beginning to what is going to happen in his monastery.
If anyone had been enlightened he could have done anything. He could have come and slapped Kyozan and taken the mirror from him, and said to the assembly, "The mirror is mine! There is no need to smash it." Or anything!

The mirror is nobody's. And to use a gift of the master on the first day of the opening ceremony... this is not nice to smash the mirror. Somebody was needed to smash the face of Kyozan, which would have saved the mirror! But nobody was enlightened enough.

taken from Kyozan: A True Man of Zen, by Osho
Other "Lost and Found" commentaries by Osho

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