RACING


Ray Leduc at the helm of " Dream One "





     Whenever two or more sailboats are sailing in close proximity it is very rare an informal race does not develop. If the boats are of equal length and size a captains skill is put to the test and you always end a race, win or lose, a lot wiser.

     Generally, a sailboat that has a longer waterline length is faster, but the wind is variable and that can help or hinder a sailor's aspirations. Listening to the weather forecast and understanding the wind information before you set sail is an invaluable asset for a successful race.

     A fellow sailor and friend, Ray Leduc, was always willing to match his boat against mine, even though it was 4ft shorter and I won nearly every encounter. On one occasion his perserverence would pay off.

    We had departed De Tour Village, Michigan, and in light to moderate winds made our way toward Meldrum Bay, ON. 45 miles away. After 8 hrs. sailing and 7 miles from our destination I was about 3 miles ahead of Ray when I entered an area of no wind, I could'nt get my boat to move and he was getting closer and closer. He saw what was happening to me and sailed closer to shore avoiding the area I was in, Ray was a mile ahead by the time I was making headway again and ultimately reached our destination first. I never heard the end of that one.
 


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Created 11 April 2002 by Mark Smith
Last Updated on 27 December 2010